People

Penn IUR is affiliated with more than 200 experts in the field of urbanism. Its Faculty Fellows program identifies faculty at the University of Pennsylvania with a demonstrated interest in urban research; the Penn IUR Scholars program identifies urban scholars outside of Penn; and the Penn IUR Fellows program identifies expert urban practitioners. Together, these programs foster a community of scholars and encourage cross-disciplinary collaboration.

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Affiliated PhD Student

Jane Abell

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Doctoral Candidate in Anthropology, University of Pennsylvania

About

Jane Lief Abell is a second year doctoral student in Anthropology at the University of Pennsylvania. Her research explores Islam in the United States, with a particular focus on how race and religion inform relations among "native" and immigrant Muslim groups. Currently, she is working with Al-Bustan Seeds of Culture, an Arabic language and arts organization based in West Philly, and conducting fieldwork in Northeast Philadelphia. Prior to entering graduate school, Jane held several research and editorial positions at the Center for Middle East Studies at Harvard University; Harvard Divinity School; the Berkman Center for Internet & Society; the Consortium on Gender, Security, and Human Rights; and Law People Management, LLC. Jane holds a BA with High Honors in Sociology & Anthropology and Islamic Studies from Swarthmore College. 

 

Emerging Scholar

Arthur Acolin

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Assistant Professor, Department of Real Estate, University of Washington

Areas of Interest

    About

    Arthur Acolin is an Assistant Professor of Real Estate at the University of Washington with a broad interest in housing economics and a focus on international housing policy and finance. He completed his PhD in Urban Planning and Development at the University of Southern California in 2017. Recent research projects include a study of the presence of discrimination against different immigrant groups in the rental market in France with Raphael Bostic and Gary Painter, an examination of the effect of non-traditional mortgages on homeownership in the US with Xudong An, Raphael Bostic and Susan Wachter and the development of housing affordability indicators incorporating location for the metropolitan region of Sao Paulo, Brazil with Richard Green. Prior to doing his Ph.D., Acolin was a Research Associate at the Penn Institute for Urban Research working on housing, urbanization and economic development issues. He obtained a master in Urban Policy from the London School of Economics and Sciences Po Paris and an undergraduate degree in Urban Studies from the University of Pennsylvania.

    Selected Publications

    Acolin, Arthur, and Domenic Vitiello. "Who owns Chinatown: Neighbourhood preservation and change in Boston and Philadelphia." Urban Studies (2017): 0042098017699366.

    Acolin, Arthur, Xudong An, Raphael W. Bostic, and Susan M. Wachter. "Homeownership and Nontraditional and Subprime Mortgages." Housing Policy Debate 27.3 (2017): 393-418.

    Acolin, Arthur, Raphael Bostic, and Gary Painter. "A field study of rental market discrimination across origins in France." Journal of Urban Economics 95 (2016): 49-63.

    Acolin, Arthur, Jesse Bricker, Paul Calem, and Susan Wachter. "Borrowing constraints and homeownership." The American Economic Review 106.5 (2016): 625-629.

    Acolin, Arthur, and Richard K. Green. "Measuring housing affordability in São Paulo metropolitan region: Incorporating location." Cities 62 (2017): 41-49.

    Faculty Fellow

    Stefan Al

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    Associate Professor of Urban Design

    About

    Stefan Al is an architect, urban designer, urban planner, scholar, educator, and author, currently serving as Associate Professor of Urban Design at the University of Pennsylvania. In his research, Professor Al aims to understand pressing issues in architecture and urban design, such as urbanization in developing countries, new forms of consumerism, compact city form, and adapting cities to climate change.

    His recent sole-authored book The Strip: Las Vegas and the Architecture of the American Dream (The MIT Press) investigates the city’s experiments with architecture and branding. He is acclaimed for his work on Asian urbanism with published books investigating China’s informal settlements and Hong Kong’s compact urban form, including Factory Towns of South ChinaVillages in the City, Mall City, and Macau and the Casino Complex. He co-authored the book Beyond Mobility, making the case to connect people with places through transit-oriented development. His latest research is focused on designing compact and more resilient cities, most notably in his forthcoming book Adapting Cities to Sea Level Rise. Besides his academic publications, his work has been featured in influential media outlets including The Guardian, The Wall Street Journal, NPR, Marketplace, and Dezeen

    Al’s career as a practicing architect includes work on renowned projects such as the 2,000-feet high Canton Tower in Guangzhou, the preservation of world heritage in Latin America at the World Heritage Center of UNESCO, and an 11,000-acre new eco-friendly city in India. He has also served as an advisor to the Hong Kong government, consulting on the development of the city’s harbor and external lighting guidelines, the Chinese government, advising on new urban design guidelines, and the United Nations High-Level Political Forum on Sustainable Development. 

    Selected Publications

    Al, Stefan. 2017. The Strip: Las Vegas and the Architecture of the American Dream. The MIT Press.

    Al, Stefan, ed. 2016. Mall City: Hong Kong’s Dreamworlds of Consumption. University of Hawaii Press.

    Al, Stefan, ed. 2014. Villages in the City: A Guide to South China’s Informal Settlements. University of Hawaii Press; Hong Kong University Press.

    Al, Stefan, ed. 2012. Factory Towns of South China: An Illustrated Guidebook. Hong Kong University Press.

    Penn IUR Scholar

    Frank S. Alexander

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    Sam Nunn Professor of Law, Emory University School of Law

    Areas of Interest

      About

      Frank Alexander is the Sam Nunn Professor of Law at the Emory University School of Law. His areas of expertise include property, real estate sales and finance, state and local government law, law and theology, federal housing policies, and homelessness. Alexander is the Director of the Project on Affordable Housing and Community Development, and Co-founder and Senior Advisor of the Center for Community Progress.  Alexander served as a Fellow of The Carter Center of Emory University (1993-1996), Commissioner of the State Housing Trust Fund for the Homeless (1994-1998), Interim Dean of Emory School of Law (2005-2006), and as Visiting Fellow at the Joint Center for Housing Studies, Harvard University (2007). He also has testified before Congress concerning the mortgage foreclosure crisis (2008). He is the author or editor of eight books and more than forty articles in real estate finance, community development, and law and theology.

      Selected Publications

      Alexander, Frank. 2013-2014. Georgia Real Estate Finance and Foreclosure Law (8th ed). Thomson Reuters.

      Alexander, Frank. 2011. Land Banks and Land Banking. Center for Community Progress.

      Alexander, Frank and Leslie A. Powell. 2011. Neighborhood Stabilization Strategies for Vacant and Abandoned Properties. Zoning & Planning Law Report, 34 (September).

      Alexander, Frank. 2009. Neighborhood Stabilization & Land Banking. Communities & Banking, 20(3). Boston: Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.

      Alexander, Frank. 2008. Land Banking As Metropolitan Policy. Washington, DC: Brookings Institution.

      Faculty Fellow

      Francesca Ammon

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      Assistant Professor

      About

      Francesca Russello Ammon is Assistant Professor of City and Regional Planning and Historic Preservation in the School of Design. As a cultural historian of the built environment, her teaching, research, and writing focus on the changing shapes and spaces of the 20th- and 21st-century American city. She grounds her interdisciplinary approach to this subject in the premise that the landscape materializes social relations, cultural values, and economic processes. In particular, she is interested in the ways that visual culture informs planning and design, the dynamic relationships between cities and nature, and the politics of place and space. 

      Before joining the School of Design faculty, Ammon was a Visiting Scholar at the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. She has also held the Sally Kress Tompkins Fellowship, jointly sponsored by the Society of Architectural Historians (SAH) and the Historic American Buildings Survey (HABS). While completing her Ph.D. in American Studies, she held long-term fellowships as a Whiting Fellow in the Humanities, Ambrose Monell Foundation Fellow in Technology and Democracy at the Miller Center of Public Affairs, and John E. Rovensky Fellow with the Business History Conference.

      For the past year and a half, Ammon has been a Researcher on the Mellon Foundation-funded project on “Photography and/of Architecture” at the Canadian Centre for Architecture. She is also currently a colloquium member of the Penn/Mellon Foundation Humanities + Urbanism + Design Initiative, and she is a recent past fellow of Penn’s Price Lab for Digital Humanities. 

      Ammon is on the board of the Society for American City and Regional Planning History (SACRPH).

      Selected Publications

      Ammon, Francesca Russello. 2016. Bulldozer: Demolition and Clearance of the Postwar Landscape. New Haven: Yale University Press.

      Ammon, Francesca Russello. 2015. “Post-Industrialization and the City of Consumption: Attempted Revitalization in Asbury Park, New Jersey.” Journal of Urban History 41(2): 158-174.

      Ammon, Francesca Russello. 2012. “Unearthing Benny the Bulldozer: The Culture of Clearance in Postwar Children’s Books.” Technology and Culture 53(2): 306-336.

      Ammon, Francesca Russello. 2009. “Commemoration Amid Criticism: The Mixed Legacy of Urban Renewal in Southwest Washington, D.C.” Journal of Planning History 8(3): 175-220.

      Penn IUR Scholar

      Elijah Anderson

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      William K. Lanman, Jr. Professor of Sociology, Yale University

      About

      Elijah Anderson is the William K. Lanman, Jr. Professor of Sociology at Yale University. He is widely considered one of the best urban ethnographers in the United States. His publications include Code of the Street: Decency, Violence, and the Moral Life of the Inner City (1999), winner of the Komarovsky Award from the Eastern Sociological Society; Streetwise: Race, Class, and Change in an Urban Community (1990), winner of the American Sociological Association’s Robert E. Park Award for the best published book in the area of Urban Sociology, and the classic sociological work, A Place on the Corner (1978, 2nd ed., 2003). Anderson’s most recent ethnographic work, The Cosmopolitan Canopy: Race and Civility in Everyday Life, was published by WW Norton in March 2012. Anderson is the 2013 recipient of the prestigious Cox-Johnson-Frazier Award of the American Sociological Association. His research interests include inequality, race relations, urban ethnography, sociology of culture, and crime, and social control.

      Selected Publications

      Anderson, Elijah, Dana Asbury, Duke W. Austin, Esther Chihye Kim, and Vani Kulkarni, eds. 2012. Bringing Fieldwork Back In: Contemporary Urban Ethnographic Research. The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science 642 (June). Sage Press.

      Anderson, Elijah. 2012. The Cosmopolitan Canopy: Race and Civility in Everyday Life. New York: W. W. Norton & Company.

      Anderson, Elijah, ed. 2009. Urban Ethnography: Its Traditions and Its Future. Ethnography 10(4), Special Double Issue. Sage Press. 

      Anderson, Elijah, ed. 2008. Against the Wall: Poor, Young, Black, and Male. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.

      Anderson, Elijah, Scott N. Brooks, Raymond Gunn, and Nikki Jones, eds. 2004. Being Here and Being There: Fieldwork Encounters and Ethnographic Discoveries. The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science 595 (September). New York: Sage Press.

      Fellow

      Stuart Andreason

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      Senior Community and Economic Development Adviser, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta

      Areas of Interest

        About

        Stuart Andreason is senior community and economic development adviser, specializing in human capital and workforce development, at the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta. His major fields of study are workforce and human capital development policy and economic development policy, with a specialization in labor market and socioeconomic conditions in metropolitan areas. Prior to joining the Atlanta Fed, Andreason was a research associate at the Penn Institute for Urban Research at the University of Pennsylvania (PennIUR). There, he helped develop a set of indicators of livable and sustainable communities for the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development funded by the Ford Foundation. He was a predoctoral fellow of the Department of Education's Institute of Education Sciences at Penn and a Lincoln Institute of Land Policy C. Lowell Harriss dissertation fellow. Previously, he led two nonprofit organizations focused on economic revitalization in small towns in central Virginia and worked as a research associate for the Pew Partnership for Civic Change. He has bachelor's and master's degrees in urban and environmental planning from the University of Virginia and a PhD in city and regional planning from the University of Pennsylvania.

         

        Selected Publications

        Andreason, Stuart and Laura Wolf-Powers. 2012. “Aligning Secondary and Post-Secondary Credentialization with Economic Development Strategy or ‘If Low Educational Attainment = Poor Metropolitan Competitiveness, What Can be Done About It.” In Preparing Today’s Students for Tomorrow’s Jobs in Metropolitan America, Laura W. Perna, ed. University of Pennsylvania Press.

        Lynch, Amy, Stuart Andreason, Theodore Eisenman, John Robinson, Kenneth Steif, and Eugenie L. Birch. Sustainable Urban Development Indicators for the United States. Penn Institute for Urban Research. September 2011

        Birch, Eugenie, Amy Lynch, Stuart Andreason, Theodore Eisenman, John Robinson, and Kenneth Steif. Measuring U.S. Sustainable Urban Development. Penn Institute for Urban Research. September 2011.

        Morse, Suzanne, Stuart Andreason, Tom Cross, and Joanne Tu. Southern Virginia: Building Competitive Advantage. Civic Change Incorporated. 2010.

        Andreason, Stuart. May 2014. Dissertation: “Will Talent Attraction and Retention Improve Metropolitan Labor Markets? The Labor Market Impact of Increased Educational Attainment in U.S. Metropolitan Regions 1990-2010.”  University of Pennsylvania.  

         

        Affiliated PhD Student

        Cameron Anglum

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        Doctoral Candidate in Education Policy, University of Pennsylvania

        School/Department

        Areas of Interest

          About

          Cameron Anglum is a Doctoral Student in Education Policy and a Dean’s Scholar at the Graduate School of Education. He is interested in research centered on domestic urban educational reform in the context of myriad interdependent urban concerns including fiscal policy, spatial analysis, and public-private partnerships, subjects often siloed in public dialogue.

          Formerly of the Penn Institute for Urban Research, Anglum earned a Master’s degree in Education Policy at Penn GSE and a Bachelor’s degree in Economics from Penn’s College of Arts and Sciences. Prior to returning to Penn, he worked in investment management in the portfolio construction space for private and institutional clients.

           

          Sydney Baloue

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          PhD Candidate, Africana Studies, School of Arts & Sciences, University of Pennyslvania

          About

          Sydney Baloue is a William Fontaine Fellow of Africana Studies at the University of Pennsylvania. His research explores Black dance and music subcultures and Black queer geographies within urban landscapes. He has a particular focus on the usage of oral histories to document genealogies of Black and Latinx LGBT communities in New York City and in Europe, which constitute ball/house culture and voguing. His research methods include oral histories, performance ethnography, data analysis and international/regional comparative research. Prior to entering graduate school at Penn, Sydney was awarded a German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD) Study Scholarship in 2011. He was a Transatlantic Fellow at Ecologic Institute in Berlin from 2012 to 2014. Sydney holds a dual-degree MSc/MA in Urban Policy from the London School of Economics and the Paris Institute of Political Studies (Sciences Po). He graduated magna cum laude with a BA in Political Science and French & Francophone Studies from the University of Pennsylvania in 2011.

          Selected Publications

          Sydney Baloue, (2016) Black and Latin@ Queer Geographies and Oral Histories of Ballroom Culture in New York City. (London, UK: Masters Thesis, London School of Economics and Politics, 2016).

          Haut Conseil d’Egalité Entre Femmes et Hommes – Premier Ministre, (2015) Avis sur le harcèlement sexiste et les violences sexuelles dans les transports en commun. – Report for French Prime Minister’s Office No. 2015-04-16-VIO-16 (Paris, France: Haut Conseil d’Egalité Entre Femmes et Hommes, 2015)

          Sydney Baloue and Cecile Moore, Think Tanks in a Time of Crisis and Paralysis: On the Sidelines or Catalysts for Ideas and Actions? (Philadelphia, PA: Think Tanks and Civil Societies Program, 2013).

          Ecologic Institute, E.On, Policy Studies Institute (2013): Consumer preferences for smart homes: a comparative study between the United Kingdom, Germany and Italy. – Report for E.On under E.On International Research Initiative 2012.

          Faculty Fellow

          Daniel Barber

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          Assistant Professor

          About

          Daniel Barber is an Assistant Professor of Architecture in the School of Design. He is an architectural historian with a research interest in the relationship between the design fields and the emergence of global environmental culture across the 20th century. His research looks at the role of architectural technologies in the infrastructural and territorial transformations of the immediate post-World War II period in the United States. Barber’s first book, A House in the Sun: Modern Architecture and Solar Energy in the Cold War, documents the brief but dynamic interest in solar houses in the 1940s and 50s. His second book, Climatic Effects: Architecture, Media, and the Planetary Interior will explore climate-focused architectural design methods from the 1930s to the 1960s.  Barber approaches research and teaching from an interdisciplinary perspective, integrating narratives and methods from histories of technology, science, politics, economics, and environmentalism.

          Selected Publications

          Barber, Daniel. 2018 (forthcoming). Climatic Effects: Architecture, Media, and the Planetary Interior. Princeton University Press.

          Barber, Daniel. 2017. “The Nature of the Image: Olgyay and Olgyay's Architectural-Climatic Diagrams in the 1950s.” Public Culture 29(1): 129-164.

          Barber, Daniel. 2016. “Introduction to Architectural History in the Anthropocene.” The Journal of Architecture 21(8): 1165-1170. 

          Barber, Daniel. 2016. House in the Sun: Modern Architecture and Solar Energy in the Cold War. New York: Oxford University Press.

          Barber, Daniel. 2016. “The Form and Climate Research Group; or, Scales of Architectural History in Climates: Architecture and the Planetary Imaginary, edited by James Graham, Caitlin Blanchfield, Alissa Anderson, Jordan Carver, and Jacob Moore, 303-318. New York: Columbia Books on Architecture and the City.

          Faculty Fellow

          David Barnes

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          Director of Health and Societies Major and Associate Professor

          About

          David Barnes is Associate Professor and Director of the Health and Societies Major in the Department of History and Sociology of Science in the School of Arts and Sciences, where he teaches the history of medicine and public health. Prior to joining Penn, Barnes taught for a year at the Institute for Liberal arts at Emory University and for seven years in the History of Science Department at Harvard University. His current research is concentrated in the history of infectious disease, epidemiology, and public health; nineteenth-century urban European social and cultural history; and the politics of international disease control programs. He has a forthcoming book on the history of the Lazaretto Quarantine Station, located outside of Philadelphia.

          Selected Publications

          Barnes, David. 2014. “Cargo, ‘Infection,’ Cargo, and the Logic of Quarantine in the Nineteenth Century.” Bulletin of the History of Medicine 88(1).

          Barnes, David. 2010. “Targeting Patient Zero." In Tuberculosis Then and Now: Perspectives on the History of an Infectious Disease, 49-71, edited by Flurin Condrau and Michael Worboys.  Montreal, QC and Kingston, ON: McGill-Queen's University Press.

          Barnes, David. 2006. The Great Stink of Paris and the Nineteenth-Century Struggle against Filth and Germs. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press.

          Barnes, David. 2002. “Scents and Sensibilities: Disgust and the Meanings of Odors in Late Nineteenth-Century Paris." Historical Reflections/Réflexions historiques 28: 21-49.

          Barnes, David. 1 995. The Making of a Social Disease: Tuberculosis in Nineteenth-Century France. University of California Press.

          Faculty Fellow

          Jonathan Barnett

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          Professor Emeritus of Practice in City and Regional Planning

          About

          Jonathan Barnett is Professor Emeritus of Practice in City and Regional Planning and former Director of the Urban Design Program in the School of Design. He is an architect and planner as well as an educator and is the author of numerous books and articles on the theory and practice of city design. He has been an advisor to the cities of Charleston, SC, Cleveland, Kansas City, Miami, Nashville, New York City, Norfolk, Omaha, and Pittsburgh in the United States, as well as Xiamen and Tianjin in China. He has been the William Henry Bishop visiting professor at Yale, the Eschweiler Professor at the University of Wisconsin, the Kea Distinguished Visiting Professor at the University of Maryland, and the Sam Gibbons Eminent Scholar at the University of South Florida, and is a guest professor at Southeast University in Nanjing. With his co-author, Larry Beasley, he teaches an on-line course, Ecodesign for Cities and Suburbs, which is available on edX. Barnett was awarded the Dale Prize for Excellence in Urban Design and Regional Planning, the Athena Medal from the Congress for the New Urbanism, and the William H. Whyte Award from the Partners for Livable Communities for being a pioneer in urban design education and practice.

          Selected Publications

          Barnett, Jonathan and Brian W. Blaesser. 2017. Reinventing Development Regulation. Cambridge MA: Lincoln Institute of Land Policy.

          Barnett, Jonathan. 2016. City Design: Modernist, Traditional, Green, and Systems Perspectives, 2nd Edition.  New York, NY: Routledge.

          Barnett, Jonathan and Larry Beasley. 2015. Ecodesign for Cities and Suburbs. Washington: Island Press. 

          Barnett, Jonathan, editor. 2007. Smart Growth in a Changing World. Chicago, Ill. : Planners Press, American Planning Association.

          Barnett, Jonathan. 2012. “Jane Jacobs and Designing Cities as Organized Complexity.” In The Urban Wisdom of Jane Jacobs, edited by Sonia Hirt and Diane Zamora. New York, NY: Routledge.

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