People

Penn IUR is affiliated with more than 200 experts in the field of urbanism. Its Faculty Fellows program identifies faculty at the University of Pennsylvania with a demonstrated interest in urban research; the Penn IUR Scholars program identifies urban scholars outside of Penn; and the Penn IUR Fellows program identifies expert urban practitioners. Together, these programs foster a community of scholars and encourage cross-disciplinary collaboration.

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Affiliated PhD Student

Jane Abell

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Doctoral Candidate in Anthropology, University of Pennsylvania

About

Jane Lief Abell is a second year doctoral student in Anthropology at the University of Pennsylvania. Her research explores Islam in the United States, with a particular focus on how race and religion inform relations among "native" and immigrant Muslim groups. Currently, she is working with Al-Bustan Seeds of Culture, an Arabic language and arts organization based in West Philly, and conducting fieldwork in Northeast Philadelphia. Prior to entering graduate school, Jane held several research and editorial positions at the Center for Middle East Studies at Harvard University; Harvard Divinity School; the Berkman Center for Internet & Society; the Consortium on Gender, Security, and Human Rights; and Law People Management, LLC. Jane holds a BA with High Honors in Sociology & Anthropology and Islamic Studies from Swarthmore College. 

 

Faculty Fellow

Francesca Ammon

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Assistant Professor

About

Francesca Russello Ammon is Assistant Professor of City and Regional Planning and Historic Preservation in the School of Design. As a cultural historian of the built environment, her teaching, research, and writing focus on the changing shapes and spaces of the 20th- and 21st-century American city. She grounds her interdisciplinary approach to this subject in the premise that the landscape materializes social relations, cultural values, and economic processes. In particular, she is interested in the ways that visual culture informs planning and design, the dynamic relationships between cities and nature, and the politics of place and space. 

Before joining the School of Design faculty, Ammon was a Visiting Scholar at the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. She has also held the Sally Kress Tompkins Fellowship, jointly sponsored by the Society of Architectural Historians (SAH) and the Historic American Buildings Survey (HABS). While completing her Ph.D. in American Studies, she held long-term fellowships as a Whiting Fellow in the Humanities, Ambrose Monell Foundation Fellow in Technology and Democracy at the Miller Center of Public Affairs, and John E. Rovensky Fellow with the Business History Conference.

For the past year and a half, Ammon has been a Researcher on the Mellon Foundation-funded project on “Photography and/of Architecture” at the Canadian Centre for Architecture. She is also currently a colloquium member of the Penn/Mellon Foundation Humanities + Urbanism + Design Initiative, and she is a recent past fellow of Penn’s Price Lab for Digital Humanities. 

Ammon is on the board of the Society for American City and Regional Planning History (SACRPH).

Selected Publications

Ammon, Francesca Russello. 2016. Bulldozer: Demolition and Clearance of the Postwar Landscape. New Haven: Yale University Press.

Ammon, Francesca Russello. 2015. “Post-Industrialization and the City of Consumption: Attempted Revitalization in Asbury Park, New Jersey.” Journal of Urban History 41(2): 158-174.

Ammon, Francesca Russello. 2012. “Unearthing Benny the Bulldozer: The Culture of Clearance in Postwar Children’s Books.” Technology and Culture 53(2): 306-336.

Ammon, Francesca Russello. 2009. “Commemoration Amid Criticism: The Mixed Legacy of Urban Renewal in Southwest Washington, D.C.” Journal of Planning History 8(3): 175-220.

Faculty Fellow

David Brownlee

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Frances Shapiro-Weitzenhoffer Professor of 19th Century European Art

About

David Brownlee is the Frances Shapiro-Weitzenhoffer Professor of 19th Centurey European Art in the History of Art in the School of Arts and Sciences. He is a historian of modern architecture whose interests embrace a wide range of subjects in Europe and America, from the late 18th century to the present. Brownlee has won numerous fellowships and his work has earned three major publication prizes from the Society of Architectural Historians. He is a recipient of the University of Pennsylvania’s Lindback Award for Distinguished Teaching. 

Selected Publications

Brownlee, David, and Derek Gillman. 2012. The Barnes Foundation: Two Buildings, One Mission. New York: Skira Rizzoli.

Brownlee, David, David De Long, and Kathryn Hiesinger. 2001. Out of the Ordinary: Robert Venturi, Denise Scott Brown and Associates: Architecture, Urbanism, Design. Philadelphia: Philadelphia Museum of Art.

Thomas, George and David Brownlee. 2000. Building America’s First University: An Historical and Architectural Guide to the University of Pennsylvania. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.

Brownlee, David. 1997. Making a Modern Classic: The Architecture of the Philadelphia Museum of Art. Philadelphia: Philadelphia Museum of Art.

Brownlee, David B. and David G. De Long. 1991. Louis I. Kahn: In the Realm of Architecture. New York: Rizzoli International Publications.

 

Affiliated PhD Student

Veronica Brownstone

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Phd Candidate, Hispanic Studies, School of Arts & Sciences, University of Pennsylvania

About

Veronica Brownstone is a fourth year doctoral student in Hispanic Studies at the University of Pennsylvania. Her dissertation explores how contemporary Central American cultural production deals with the current crisis of disposable labor power. Drawing on the intersections of political economy, critical race theory, and class politics, her research asks what literature and film tell us about the political textures of today’s surplus populations. Of particular interest to her work are the dynamics of the informal, service, and migrant sectors as they relate to subject formation and collectivity. Veronica holds a BA with Honors in Latin American and Caribbean Studies from McGill University. 

Penn IUR Scholar

Carolyn Chernoff

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Visiting Assistant Professor of Sociology, Skidmore College

About

Carolyn Chernoff is a Visiting Assistant Professor of Sociology at Skidmore College. She is an urban and cultural sociologist specializing in the role of culture in reproducing and transforming urban inequality. While a doctoral student at the University of Pennsylvania, Chernoff received the 2013 Arnold Award for Outstanding Contribution by a Doctoral Student from the Graduate School of Education, the Dean's Scholarship (GSE), and served as a 2012-2013 Graduate Fellow for Teaching Excellence at Penn's Center for Teaching and Learning. Chernoff’s work focuses on cities, arts, and social change, particularly on the level of social interaction and the production of community. Her dissertation, “Imagining the City: Ritual and Conflict in the Urban Art Democracy,” is based on ethnographic research conducted over a period of eight years at three different community-arts organizations in a major Mid-Atlantic city. 

Selected Publications

Chernoff, Carolyn. 2013, forthcoming. Spelling It Out: Difference and Diversity in Public Conversation. Michigan Sociological Review, 27.

Chernoff, Carolyn. 2013. “Conflict Theory in Education.” In Sociology of Education, James Ainsworth and Geoffrey J. Golson, eds. Sage Publications.

Chernoff, Carolyn. 2013. “Waldorf Education.” In Sociology of Education, James Ainsworth and Geoffrey J. Golson, eds. Sage Publications.

Chernoff, Carolyn. 2010. Objectifying Measures: The Dominance of High-Stakes Testing and the Politics of Schooling – By Amanda Walker Johnson. Anthropology & Education Quarterly, 41: 212–213.

Chernoff, Carolyn.  2009. On Culture, Art, and Experience. Perspectives on Urban Education (Penn GSE electronic journal), 6(2): 77-78.

Emerging Scholar

Meagan Ehlenz

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Assistant Professor, School of Geography and Urban Planning, Arizona State University

About

Meagan Ehlenz is an assistant professor at Arizona State University's School of Geography and Urban Planning. Her major fields of study include urban revitalization and community development, with specializations in the role of anchor institutions in urban places and mechanisms for building community wealth. Prior to joining ASU's faculty, Ehlenz was a Research Associate at the Penn Institute for Urban Research. In this capacity, she developed a set of case studies for Penn IUR's Anchor Institution Roundtable (PRAI), The Power of Eds & Meds: Urban Universities Investing in Neighborhood Revitalization and Innovation. She was also a Lincoln Institute of Land Policy C. Lowell Harriss dissertation fellow. Previously, Ehlenz worked as a planning consultant in Southeastern Wisconsin and as a senior planner for the City of Milwaukee’s Department of City Development. She holds a PhD in City and Regional Planning from the Department of City and Regional Planning at the University of Pennsylvania, a Master in Urban Planning from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, and a Bachelor in Environmental Design from the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay.

Selected Publications

Ehlenz, Meagan M. "Neighborhood Revitalization and the Anchor Institution: Assessing the Impact of the University of Pennsylvania's West Philadelphia Initiatives on University City." Urban Affairs Review (forthcoming).

Ehlenz, Meagan M. and Eugénie L. Birch with Brian Agness.  The Power of Eds and Meds: Urban Universities Investing in Neighborhood Revitalization & Innovation. Philadelphia: Penn Institute for Urban Research, 2014.

Ehlenz, Meagan M. “Managing the Land Access Paradox in the Urbanising World.” Critical Housing Analysis 1, no. 1 (2014). 

Ehlenz, Meagan M. Community Land Trusts and Limited Equity Cooperatives: A Marriage of Affordable Homeownership Models? Working Paper. Cambridge, MA: Lincoln Institute of Land Policy, 2014.

Ehlenz, Meagan M. Review of New Deal Ruins: Race, Economic Justice, and Public Housing Policy by Edward G. Goetz (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 2013). Journal of Urban Affairs 36, no. 3 (2014): 540-541.

Penn IUR Scholar

Richard Florida

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Director of Business and Creativity, The Martin Prosperity Institute, Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto

Global Research Professor, New York University

Areas of Interest

    About

    Richard Florida is Director of the Martin Prosperity Institute at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management and a Global Research Professor at New York University. He previously taught at Carnegie Mellon University and George Mason University.  Florida is one of the world’s leading public intellectuals on economic competitiveness, demographic trends, and cultural and technological innovation. He is also Senior Editor at The Atlantic, where he co-founded and serves as Editor-at-Large for The Atlantic Cities, as well as the Creative Class Group. He is the author of several best-selling books including his award-winning book The Rise of the Creative Class.

    Selected Publications

    Florida, Richard. 2010. The Great Reset: How the Post-Crash Economy Will Change the Way We Live and Work. New York: HarperCollins.

    Florida, Richard. 2009. Who’s Your City?: How the Creative Economy Is Making Where to Live the Most Important Decision of Your Life. New York: Basic Books.

    Florida, Richard. 2005. The Flight of the Creative Class: The New Global Competition for Talent. New York: HarperCollins.

    Florida, Richard. 2002. The Rise of the Creative Class. New York: Basic Books.

    Faculty Fellow

    Vivian Gadsden

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    William T. Carter Professor of Child Development and Education

    Director, National Center on Fathers and Families

    Associate Director, National Center on Adult Literacy

    About

    Vivian Gadsden is the William T. Carter Professor of Child Development and Education, Director of the National Center on Fathers and Families, and Associate Director of the National Center on Adult Literacy at the Graduate School of Education. Her research interests focus on cultural and social factors affecting learning and literacy across the life-course and within families, particularly those at the greatest risk for academic and social vulnerability and her writing focuses on intergenerational learning. Her current projects include a longitudinal study on intergenerational learning within African-American and Latino families; a study of parent engagement in children’s early literacy; a study with young fathers in urban settings; a study on literacy, education, and health; a policy study on incarcerated parents and their families; and a study of children of incarcerated parents. She is participating in an NICHD-funded project (Dr. John Fantuzzo, principal investigator) on the development of an integrated Head Start curriculum.

    Selected Publications

    Gadsden, Vivian L., and Ezekiel J. Dixon-Román. 2017. “’Urban’ Schooling and ‘Urban’ Families: The Role of Context and Place.” Urban Education 52(4).

    Breiner, Heather, Morgan Ford, and Vivian L. Gadsden. 2016. Parenting Matters : Supporting Parents of Children Ages 0-8. Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education; Board on Children, Youth, and Families; Committee on Supporting the Parents of Young Children.

    Southerland, Sherry A., Vivian L. Gadsden, Carolyn D. Herrington. 2014. “Editors’ Introduction: What Should Count as Quality Education Research?” Educational Researcher 43(1).

    Fantuzzo, John W. , Vivian L. Gadsden, and Paul A. McDermott. 2011. “An Integrated Curriculum to Improve Mathematics, Language, and Literacy for Head Start Children.” American Educational Research Journal 48(3).

     

    Faculty Fellow

    David Grazian

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    Associate Professor of Sociology; Graduate Chair

    About

    David Grazian is Associate Professor of Sociology and Graduate Chair in the Department of Sociology in the School of Arts and Sciences. His research areas include sociology of culture, popular culture and mass media, urban sociology, symbolic interaction, race and ethnicity, ethnographic methods and social theory. Grazian teaches courses on popular culture, mass media and the arts, cities and urban sociology, social interaction and public behavior, and ethnographic methods. In his research he employs a variety of ethnographic and other qualitative methods to study the production and consumption of commercial entertainment in the urban milieu. He recently received a fellowship from the Institute for Advanced Studies (IAS) in Princeton, New Jersey to pursue his research full time during the 2013-2014 academic year. During his sabbatical year of residence, Grazian will complete a book manuscript on metropolitan zoos as repositories of culture as well as nature. The book is tentatively titled Where the Wild Things Aren’t: City Zoos and the Culture of Nature.

    Selected Publications

    Grazian, David. 2017. Mix it Up: Popular Culture, Mass Media, and Society, 2nd Edition. New York: W.W. Norton.

    Grazian, David. 2016. American Zoo: A Sociological Safari. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.

    Garner, Betsie and David Grazian. 2016. “Naturalizing Gender through Childhood Socialization Messages in a Zoo.” Social Psychology Quarterly 79(3): 181-198.

    Grazian, David. 2011. On the Make: The Hustle of Urban Nightlife. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

    Grazian, David. 2005. Blue Chicago: The Search for Authenticity in Urban Blues Clubs. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

    Faculty Fellow

    David Young Kim

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    Assistant Professor of Art History

    About

    David Young Kim is Assistant Professor in the Department of History of Art in the School of Arts and Sciences. He teaches and researches Southern Renaissance art, with a focus on art literature, transcultural exchange, and material culture. He received his B.A. in English and French literature from Amherst College (1999) and his M.A. and Ph.D. from Harvard (2009), in addition to attending the Humboldt University in Berlin and the Université Paris Diderot-Paris 7. Before joining the Penn faculty in 2013, he was a postdoctoral faculty fellow (wissenschaftlicher Assistent) at the University of Zurich in Switzerland (2009-2013) and a visiting faculty member at the Universidade Federal de São Paulo in Brazil (2011-2013). In May 2017, he delivered the Tomàs Harris Lectures at the University College London. He received the 2017 Dean’s Award for Innovation in Teaching for his contributions to undergraduate education.

    Selected Publications

    Kim, David. Forthcoming. Authenticity and Art as Object: A Handbook of Terms. [compilation of keyword entries written by art history grad students as part of Mellon Object-Based Study Initiatives]

    Kim, David. Forthcoming. “Stonework and Crack in Giovanni Bellini’s St. Francis in the Wilderness.” In Steinformen. Materialität, Qualität, Imitation, edited by Isabella Augart, Maurice Saß, and Iris Wenderholm. Berlin / Boston: De Gruyter.

    Kim, David. Forthcoming. “The Triumph and Pathos of Perspective.” In Urban Artefacts: Triumphal Arches and the Paragone between the Arts, edited by Alina Payne. Pisa: Scuola Normale di Pisa Press.

    Kim, David. 2014. The Traveling Artist in the Italian Renaissance. New Haven: Yale University Press.

    Kim, David Y, ed. 2013. Matters of Weight: Force, Gravity, and Aesthetics in the Early Modern Period. Berlin: Edition Imorde.

    Faculty Fellow

    Lynn Hollen Lees

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    Professor of History Emeritus

    About

    Lynn Hollen Lees is Professor of History Emeritus, having retired in 2013 from her position as Vice Provost for Faculty after serving for several years as co-director of the Joseph H. Lauder Institute of Management and International Studies. Her teaching was primarily in the fields of British history, European social history, and world history. She has spent time as an exchange Professor at University College London, Catholic University of Leuven, and the University of Diponegoro in Indonesia, and was Chair of the Department of History between 1995 and 2001. Her research centers on European cities, their social organization, and their welfare institutions. 

    Selected Publications

    Crossley, Pamela K., Lynn Hollen Lees, and John W. Servos. 2012. Global Society: The World Since 1900, 3rd edition. Cengage Learning.

    Lees, Lynn Hollen. 2008. The Solidarities of Strangers: The British Poor Laws and the People, 1700-1948. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

    Lees, Lynn Hollen and Andrew Lees. 2007. Cities and the Making of Modern Europe, 1750-1914. Cambridge University Press.

    Lees, Lynn Hollen and Paul Hohenberg. 1995. The Making of Urban Europe, 1000-1995. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. 

    Lees, Lynn Hollen. 1979. Exiles of Erin: Irish Migrants in Victorian London. Manchester: Manchester University Press. 

    Faculty Fellow

    Ken Lum

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    Professor of Fine Arts and Director of the Fine Arts Undergraduate Program

    School/Department

    Areas of Interest

      About

      Ken Lum is Chair of the Department of Fine Arts in the School of Design. Prior to coming to Penn, Lum was Head of the Graduate Program in Studio Art at the University of British Columbia, Visiting Professor at the École Nationale Supérieure des Beaux-Arts in Paris, and Graduate Professor at the Milton Avery Graduate School of Arts at Bard College. He is co-founder and founding Editor of Yishu: The Journal of Contemporary Chinese Art. Lum was made a Guggenheim Fellow in 1999 and awarded a Killam Award for Outstanding Research in 1998 and the Hnatyshyn Foundation Visual Arts Award in 2007. He has served on the Board of Directors for the The PowerPlant (Toronto), Annie Wong Art Foundation (Hong Kong), Arts Initiative Tokyo, and Centre A (Vancouver). He was co-curator of Shanghai Modern: 1919-1945 and Sharjah Biennial 7. He recently co-curated Monument Lab: A Public Art and History Project in Philadelphia.

      Selected Publications

      Lum, Ken. 2016. “The Figure in the Carpet.” Catalog essay for the exhibition Wall to Wall: Carpets by Artists, curated by Dr. Cornelia Lauf for the Museum of Contemporary Art, Cleveland.

      Lum, Ken. 2009. “Dear Steven.” In Art School: (Propositions for the 21st Century), edited by Steven Madoff. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

      Lum, Ken and Hubert Damisch. 2008. Ultimo Bagaglio. Paris: Three Star Books.

      Lum, Ken. 1999. “Canadian Cultural Policy: A Metaphysical Problem.” In Conference 1: Inside Out: Reassessing International Cultural Influence. Wroclaw, Poland: Apexart.

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