People

Penn IUR is affiliated with more than 200 experts in the field of urbanism. Its Faculty Fellows program identifies faculty at the University of Pennsylvania with a demonstrated interest in urban research; the Penn IUR Scholars program identifies urban scholars outside of Penn; and the Penn IUR Fellows program identifies expert urban practitioners. Together, these programs foster a community of scholars and encourage cross-disciplinary collaboration.

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Faculty Fellow

Ken Lum

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Professor of Fine Arts and Director of the Fine Arts Undergraduate Program

School/Department

Areas of Interest

    About

    Ken Lum is Chair of the Department of Fine Arts in the School of Design. Prior to coming to Penn, Lum was Head of the Graduate Program in Studio Art at the University of British Columbia, Visiting Professor at the École Nationale Supérieure des Beaux-Arts in Paris, and Graduate Professor at the Milton Avery Graduate School of Arts at Bard College. He is co-founder and founding Editor of Yishu: The Journal of Contemporary Chinese Art. Lum was made a Guggenheim Fellow in 1999 and awarded a Killam Award for Outstanding Research in 1998 and the Hnatyshyn Foundation Visual Arts Award in 2007. He has served on the Board of Directors for the The PowerPlant (Toronto), Annie Wong Art Foundation (Hong Kong), Arts Initiative Tokyo, and Centre A (Vancouver). He was co-curator of Shanghai Modern: 1919-1945 and Sharjah Biennial 7. He recently co-curated Monument Lab: A Public Art and History Project in Philadelphia.

     

    Selected Publications

    Lum, Ken. 2016. “The Figure in the Carpet.” Catalog essay for the exhibition Wall to Wall: Carpets by Artists, curated by Dr. Cornelia Lauf for the Museum of Contemporary Art, Cleveland.

    Lum, Ken. 2009. “Dear Steven.” In Art School: (Propositions for the 21st Century), edited by Steven Madoff. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

    Lum, Ken and Hubert Damisch. 2008. Ultimo Bagaglio. Paris: Three Star Books.

    Lum, Ken. 1999. “Canadian Cultural Policy: A Metaphysical Problem.” In Conference 1: Inside Out: Reassessing International Cultural Influence. Wroclaw, Poland: Apexart.

     

    Faculty Fellow

    Randall Mason

    x

    Associate Professor and Chair, Department of Historic Preservation

    School/Department

    Areas of Interest

      About

      Randall Mason is Associate Professor and Chair of the Department of Historic Preservation in the School of Design. His courses focus on historic preservation planning, urban conservation, history, and cultural landscape studies. Mason’s research interests include theory and methods of preservation planning, cultural policy, the economics of preservation, historic site management, the history and design of memorials, and the history of historic preservation. He leads the Center for Research on Preservation and Society, which undertakes applied research projects on site management and on social, economic and political aspects of historic preservation. Before joining the Penn faculty in 2004, Mason worked as Senior Project Specialist at the Getty Conservation Institute, researching economic and social issues relating to heritage conservation. Previous positions include Assistant Professor and Director of Historic Preservation at the University of Maryland, and adjunct faculty in landscape architecture at RISD. His professional experience includes several years of consulting practice and co-founding the nonprofit research group Minerva Partners (which develops projects to strengthen the connections between heritage conservation and social development). He serves on the Board of Directors of the Preservation Alliance of Greater Philadelphia, and was the 2012-13 National Endowment for the Arts Rome Prize winner at the American Academy in Rome.

       

      Selected Publications

      Mason, Randall. 2012. “Broadway as a Memory Site.” In The Greatest Grid: The Master Plan of Manhattan, 1811-2011, edited by Hilary Ballon. New York City: Columbia University Press.

      Mason, Randall. 2009. The Once and Future New York: Historic Preservation and the Modern City. University of Minnesota Press.

      Page, Max and Randall Mason, eds. 2004. Giving Preservation a History: Histories of Historic Preservation in the United States. Routlege.

       

      Faculty Fellow

      Anuradha Mathur

      x

      Professor

      About

      Anuradha Mathur is of Landscape Architecture in the School of Design. She is an architect and landscape architect. In collaboration with her partner, Dilip da Cunha, she has focused her artistic and design expertise on cultural and ecological issues of contentious landscapes. Their investigations have taken them to diverse terrains, including the Lower Mississippi, New York, Sundarbans, Bangalore, Mumbai and, most recently, Jerusalem. An underlying thread in Mathur’s work is a concern for how water is visualized and engaged in ways that lead to conditions of its excess and scarcity, but also the opportunities that its fluidity offers for new visualizations of terrain, design imagination, and design practice. 

       

      Selected Publications

      Mathur, Anuradha and Dilip da Cunha. 2014. Design in the Terrain of Water. Philadelphia, PA: Applied Research + Design Publishing.

      Mathur, Anuradha and Dilip da Cunha. 2009. Soak: Mumbai in an Estuary. National Gallery of Modern Art/Rupa and Co.

      Mathur, Anuradha and Dilip da Cunha. 2006. Deccan Traverses: The Making of Bangalore’s Terrain. Rupa and Co.

      Mathur, Anuradha and Dilip da Cunha. 2001. Mississippi Floods: Designing a Shifting Landscape. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press.

       

      Penn IUR Scholar

      Marina Peterson

      x

      Associate Professor of Performance Studies, School of Interdisciplinary Arts, Ohio University

      Areas of Interest

        About

        Marina Peterson is Associate Professor of Performance Studies at Ohio University’s School of Interdisciplinary Arts. An anthropologist, her work focuses on practices and processes of city making. Her research has explored multi-scalar dimensions of urban space through the study of sensory, sonic, and embodied processes ranging from musical performance to planning and labor. She has conducted ethnographic research in Los Angeles, Singapore, and Appalachian Ohio. Her work has appeared in Anthropological Quarterly, O-Zone: A Journal of Object-Oriented Studies, Space and Culture, Journal of Popular Music Studies, and Urban Anthropology.

         

        Selected Publications

        Peterson, Marina. 2013. Sound Work: Law, Labor and Capital in the 1940s Recording Bans of the American Federation of Musicians. Anthropological Quarterly, 86(3): 791-824.

        Peterson, Marina, and Gary McDonogh, eds. 2012. Global Downtowns. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.

        Peterson, Marina. 2010. Sound, Space, and the City: Civic Performance in Downtown Los Angeles. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.

        Peterson, Marina. 2010. “Garden, City, World: Los Angeles’ Late Twentieth Century Multicultural Arts Festivals.” In The Politics of Cultural Programming in Public Spaces.  Robert Gehl and Victoria Watts, eds. Cambridge: Cambridge Scholars Publishing.

        Peterson, Marina. 2007. “Translocal Civilities: Chinese Modern Dance at Downtown Los Angeles Public Concerts.” In Deciphering the Global: Its Scales, Spaces and Subjects, 41-58, Saskia Sassen, ed. New York: Routledge.

         

        Faculty Fellow

        John Puckett

        x

        Professor of Education

        About

        John Puckett is Professor of Education in the Literacy, Culture, and International Education Division of the Graduate School of Education. His background includes six years of teaching and administrative work in public and private secondary schools in North Carolina, Georgia, and Florida. Before coming to Penn in 1987, Puckett was Director of Research and Development for REAL Enterprises, a non-profit organization that helped catalyze school-based economic development projects nationwide. He served as Associate Dean of the Graduate School of Education from 1998 to 2004 and again in 2006 to 2007. He currently chairs the School’s Policy, Measurement, and Evaluation Division. Since coming to Penn, he has been actively involved in building University partnerships with West Philadelphia schools; from 1987 to 1991, he worked with Ira Harkavy to develop the University of Pennsylvania’s Center for Community Partnerships, now called the Netter Center. In conjunction with the Netter Center and the School of Arts and Sciences’ Urban Studies Program, he teaches academically based community service seminars that focus on school- and neighborhood-improvement projects in West Philadelphia. 

         

        Selected Publications

        John L. Puckett and Mark Frazier Lloyd. 2015. Becoming Penn: The Pragmatic American University, 1950-2000. Philadelphia, PA: University of Pennsylvania Press.

        Puckett, J. L. and M.F. Lloyd. 2013. “Penn’s great expansion: Postwar urban renewal and the alliance between private universities and the public sector.” Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography 137(4): 381–430.

        Puckett, J. L., L. Benson, and I. Harkavy. 2007. Dewey’s Dream: Universities and Democracies in an Age of Education Reform. Philadelphia: Temple University Press.

        Puckett, J. L. and M. C. Johanek. 2007. Leonard Covello and the Making of Benjamin Franklin High School: Education as if Citizenship Mattered. Philadelphia: Temple University Press.

        Puckett, J. L. 1989. Foxfire Reconsidered: A Twenty-Year Experiment in Progressive Education. Urbana: University of Illinois Press. 

         

        Affiliated PhD Student

        Lindsey Reuben

        x

        PhD Candidate, Hispanic and Portuguese Studies, University of Pennsylvania

        About

        Lindsey Reuben is a fifth year graduate student in Hispanic Studies at the University of Pennsylvania whose interests and scholarship span from the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries. She has a deep interest in modern and contemporary literature and film and their relation to the environment, gender, immigration, and domestic and urban spaces. Lindsey’s dissertation, currently titled, “A Return to the Oikos: Rethinking the Transformation of the Spanish Home in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries”, addresses examples of literary and filmic production extending from these centuries that place the home at the center of a general social conflict in the larger period of Spanish urbanization and modernization. Her recent essay, “The City Unmapped: A Feminist Imagination of Urban Spaces in Javier Pérez Andújar’s Paseos con mi madre” is part of a forthcoming volume of essays, edited by Maria DiFrancesco and Debra Ochoa, titled Gender in Spanish Urban Spaces and published by Palgrave McMillan. 

        Emerging Scholar

        Claire Robertson-Kraft

        x

        Post-doctoral Fellow and Associate Director, Operation Public Education, The University of Pennsylvania

        School/Department

        Areas of Interest

          About

          Claire Robertson-Kraft earned her Ph.D. in education policy and is currently a post-doctoral fellow and the Associate Director of Operation Public Education at The University of Pennsylvania. She is the co-editor of A Grand Bargain for Education Reform: New Rewards and Supports for New Accountability (Harvard Education Press, 2009), which provides a comprehensive framework for evaluating, compensating, and developing teachers. Her research focuses on how these policies influence teachers’ motivation, effectiveness, and retention.

          After graduating from undergrad at Penn in 2004, Claire worked with Teach For America in Houston, first as a third grade teacher and then as a program director supporting elementary and special education teachers. It was during her time as a classroom teacher that she built the passion she has today for working in urban education. Claire is also very active in the civic community. She is the Co-Founder and current President of PhillyCORE Leaders and serves on the boards of Youth Build Philadelphia, Leadership Philadelphia and WHYY. In 2011, she was selected as one of the New Faces of Philly by Philadelphia Magazine, and in 2013, she received the Forum Award for Emerging Executive Women. 

           

          Selected Publications

          Robertson-Kraft, C. (2014). Teachers’ motivational responses to new evaluation policies. Paper presented at the 2014 Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

          Robertson-Kraft, C., & Duckworth, A. L. (2014). True grit: Trait-level perseverance and passion for long-term goals predicts effectiveness and retention among novice teachers. Teachers College Record.

          Cucchiara, M., Rooney, E., & Robertson-Kraft, C. (2013). I’ve never seen people work so hard! Teachers’ working conditions in the early stages of school turnaround.  Urban Education Journal.

          Robertson-Kraft, C. (2013). Professional unionism: Redefining the role. In M. B. Katz, & M. Rose (Eds.), Public education under siege. Philadelphia, PA: University of Pennsylvania Press. 

          Hershberg, T., & Robertson-Kraft, C. (Eds.). (2009). A grand bargain for education reform: New rewards and supports for new accountability. Cambridge, MA: Harvard Education Press.

           

          Affiliated PhD Student

          Mary Rocco

          x

          PhD Candidate in City and Regional Planning, University of Pennsylvania

          About

          Mary Rocco is a doctoral student in City and Regional Planning at PennDesign. Her dissertation research explores the role of philanthropic foundations in the urban revitalization of Legacy Cities. Other research interests include community development institutions, economic development, neighborhood revitalization, and poverty policy. Currently, Mary serves as the project manager for the Mellon Foundation funded Humanities, Urbanism and Design Initiative (H+U+D) at Penn. She teaches in the Urban Studies program in the School of Arts and Sciences at the University of Pennsylvania. She is also adjunct lecturer in urban studies and urban planning at Hunter College in New York City. More broadly her research interests include: urban revitalization, community and economic development, and urban institutions

           

          Faculty Fellow

          Heather Sharkey

          x

          Professor in the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations (NELC)

          About

          Heather J. Sharkey is Professor in the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations in the School of Arts and Sciences. She received her Ph.D. in History from Princeton University after conducting research abroad on a Fulbright-Hays fellowship. Before joining the Penn faculty in 2002, she taught at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), and Trinity College in Connecticut. In 2011 she won the Charles Ludwig Distinguished Teaching Award from the School of Arts and Sciences of the University of Pennsylvania. During the 2012-13 year, she was a Visiting Professor at the École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales (EHESS) in Paris.

           

          Selected Publications

          Sharkey, Heather. 2017. A History of Muslims, Christians and Jews in the Middle East. Cambridge University Press.

          Sharkey, Heather. 2013. Cultural Conversions: Unexpected Consequences of Christian Missions in the Middle East, Africa and South Asia. Syracuse University Press.

          Sharkey, Heather and Mehmet Ali Doğan, eds. 2011. American Missionaries and the Middle East: Foundational Encounters. University of Utah Press.  

          Sharkey, Heather. 2008. American Evangelicals in Egypt: Missionary Encounters in an Age of Empire. Princeton University Press.

          Sharkey, Heather. 2003. Living with Colonialism: Nationalism and Culture in the Anglo-Egyptian Sudan. University of California Press. 

           

          Faculty Fellow

          Domenic Vitiello

          x

          Associate Professor

          Assistant Chair

          About

          Domenic Vitiello is Associate Professor and Assistant Chair in the Department of City and Regional Planning in the School of Design. He researches the history and contemporary practice of community and economic development; immigrant communities; and urban agriculture and food system planning. His recent and current projects focus on immigration and civil society in Philadelphia, including a book titled The Sanctuary City that examines Central American, Southeast Asian, Liberian, Arab, and Mexican immigration since the 1970s; urban agriculture and poverty in the global North and South, including comparative research on the community economic development impacts of urban farming and gardening around the world, and a book on the social impacts of community gardening in Camden, Chicago, and Philadelphia; and the planned destruction and preservation of Chinatowns in the U.S. and Canada since c.1900.

           

          Selected Publications

          Vitiello, Domenic and Thomas J. Sugrue, editors. 2017. Immigration and Metropolitan Revitalization in the United States. Philadelphia, PA: University of Pennsylvania Press.

          Vitiello, Domenic and Arthur Acolin. 2017. “Institutional Ecosystems of Housing Support in Chinese, Southeast Asian, and African Philadelphia.” Journal of Planning Education and Research 37(2): 195-206.

          Acolin, Arthur and Domenic Vitiello. 2017. “Who Owns Chinatown: Neighborhood Change and Preservation in Boston and Philadelphia” Urban Studies.

          Vitiello, Domenic. 2017. “Infrastructure: Lifelines, Mobility, and Urban Development.” In Planning History Handbook, edited by Carola Hein. Routledge.

          Vitiello, Domenic, Jeane Ann Grisso, Rebecca Fischman, and K. Leah Whiteside. 2015. “From Commodity Surplus to Food Justice: Food Banks and Local Agriculture in the United States.” Agriculture and Human Values 32(3): 419-430.

           

          Faculty Fellow

          Richard Wesley

          x

          Adjunct Professor, Undergraduate Chair

          About

          Richard Wesley is Adjunct Professor of Architecture and Undergraduate Chair of Architecture in the School of Design. He teaches undergraduate senior architectural design studios and the senior theory seminar on cultural ecology. He also teaches the design fundamentals studio for the Integrated Product Design program, a joint program offered by the College of Engineering and Applied Science, the School of Design, and the Wharton Business School. He has taught at the University of Illinois, Notre Dame, and Harvard. He is a recipient of a National Endowment for the Arts Design Fellowship, and principal of Wesley Architects in Philadelphia, PA. Wesley’s publications on architectural theory have appeared in Architecture Monograph, Harvard Architecture Review, Rassegna, VIA, RES, and Harvard Design Magazine. 

           

          Selected Publications

          Wesley, Richard. 2014. “Edenic Affinities.” In Critical Juncture, edited by Louise Noelle Gras and Sara Topelson. Mexico City: Docomomo México and Universidad Iberoamericana.

          Wesley, Richard. 2017. “Villa Savoye—Building on a Clear Horizon.” In Wiley-Blackwell Companion to the History of Architecture, edited by Harry Malgrave. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley and Sons, Inc.

          Wesley, Richard. 2012. “Robert Le Ricolais and the Search for Automorphic Structure.” Via Books 2: 56-73.

          Wesley, Richard. 2011. “Living and Working in Paradise.” In The Religious Imagination in Modern and Contemporary Architecture, edited by Renata Hejduk and Jim Williamson. New York: Routledge.

           

          Fellow

          Lily Yeh

          x

          Global Artist and Founder, Barefoot Artists

          Areas of Interest

            About

            Lily Yeh is Global Artist and Founder of the organization Barefoot Artists. Her expertise is in community healing and building through the arts. Yeh was Professor of Painting and Art History at the University of Pennsylvania from 1968 through 1998. She is a founder of The Village of Arts and Humanities in North Philadelphia where she worked as Executive and Artistic Director from 1968 to 2004. Yeh’s mission at Barefoot Artists is to use art as a transformative power to foster community empowerment, improve the physical environment, promote economic development, and preserve indigenous art and culture. Her ventures at Barefoot Artists have led her through North America, Europe, Africa, China, and India. Using art as a medium for social revival and change, she has positively influenced many impoverished communities worldwide.

             

            Selected Publications

            Yeh, Lily. 2011. Awakening Creativity: Dandelion School Blossoms. Oakland, CA: New Village Press.

            Yeh, Lily. 2011. “Painting Hope in the World.” In Dream of a Nation: A Vision for a Better America, edited by Tyson Miller, designed by Kelly Spitzner.

            Yeh, Lily. 2011. Creativity Blossoms in the Great Migration. Yes! Online Magazine, November. 

             

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