People

Penn IUR is affiliated with more than 200 experts in the field of urbanism. Its Faculty Fellows program identifies faculty at the University of Pennsylvania with a demonstrated interest in urban research; the Penn IUR Scholars program identifies urban scholars outside of Penn; and the Penn IUR Fellows program identifies expert urban practitioners. Together, these programs foster a community of scholars and encourage cross-disciplinary collaboration.

View by:
, ,
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
clear
Penn IUR Scholar

Janet Currie

x

Henry Putnam Professor of Economics and Public Affairs, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs

Director of the Center for Health and Well Being, Princeton University

Areas of Interest

    About

    Janet Currie is the Henry Putnam Professor of Economics and Public Affairs at Princeton University and the Director of Princeton’s Center for Health and Well Being. She also directs the Program on Families and Children at the National Bureau of Economic Research. She is a Member of the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies of Sciences, a Fellow of the Econometric Society, and a Fellow of the Society of Labor Economists.  She was elected Vice President of the American Economics Association in 2010, and will be President of the Society of Labor Economists in 2014. Her research focuses on the health and well-being of children. She has written about early intervention programs, programs to expand health insurance and improve health care, public housing, and food and nutrition programs. Her current research focuses on socioeconomic differences in child health, and on environmental threats to children’s health.

    Selected Publications

    Currie, Janet, and Erdal Tekin. 2015. Is There a Link Between Foreclosure and Health? American Economic Journals: Economic Policy.

    Currie, Janet, and Joshua Graff-Zivin, Jamie Mullen, and Matthew Neidell. 2014. “What Do We Know About Short and Long Term Effects of Early Life Exposure to Pollution? Annual Review of Resource Economics. 

    Currie, Janet and Robert Khan, ed. 2012. The Future of Children. Children With Disabilities, 22(1). Washington DC: Princeton-Brookings.

    Currie, Janet and Reed Walker. 2011. Traffic Congestion and Infant Health. American Economic Journal-Applied Economics, 65-90.

    Currie, Janet M. 2006. The Invisible Safety Net: Protecting the Nation's Poor Children and Families. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.

    Affiliated PhD Student

    Matt Davis

    x

    PhD Candidate, Applied Economics, The Wharton School, University of Pennsylania

    About

    Matt begun his PhD training in Applied Economics in 2013. He earned his undergraduate degree in Economics from Princeton University in 2009 and subsequently worked as a research analyst at the Environmental Defense Fund and the Education Innovation Lab at Harvard University.  He is currently working on projects related to the distributional impact of the mortgage interest tax deduction and the consequences of housing cycles for school district finances.

    Selected Publications

    "No Excuses" Charter Schools and College Enrollment: New Evidence From a High-School Network in Chicago (with Blake Heller). Forthcoming, Education Finance and Policy.

    Affiliated PhD Student

    Anthony DeFusco

    x

    Doctoral Student in Applied Economics, University of Pennsylvania

    Areas of Interest

      About

      Anthony DeFusco is a Doctoral Student in Applied Economics at The Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. His research interests include public economics, urban economics, and real estate finance. DeFusco received his Bachelor of the Arts in Mathematics and Mathematical Economics from Temple University in 2009. Prior to graduate school, he spent some time as a research assistant at the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia.

      Selected Publications

      DeFusco, Anthony A., and Andrew D. Paciorek (2014). "The Interest Rate Elasticity of Mortgage Demand: Evidence from Bunching at the Conforming Loan Limit" Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2014-11. Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).

      DeFusco, Anthony, Wenjie Ding, Fernando Ferreira, and Joseph Gyourko (2013). “The Role of Contagion in the Last American Housing Cycle.” Wharton School, mimeo.

      Penn IUR Scholar

      Rebecca Diamond

      x

      Assistant Professor of Economics, Stanford Graduate School of Business

      About

      Rebecca Diamond is an Assistant Professor of Economics at the Stanford Graduate School of Business. She is an applied micro economist studying local labor and housing markets. Her recent research focuses on the causes and consequences of diverging economic growth across U.S. cities and its effects on inequality. She was a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research from 2013 to 2014. 

      Selected Publications

      Diamond, Rebecca. Forthcoming. Housing Supply Elasticity and Rent Extraction by State and Local Government Workers. American Economic Journal: Economic Policy.

      Diamond, Rebecca. 2016. The Determinants and Welfare Implications of US Workers’ Diverging Location Choices by Skill: 1980-2000.” American Economic Review, 106(3): 479-524. 

      Diamond, Rebecca, Thomas Barrios, Guido W. Imbens, and Michal Kolesár. 2012. Clustering, Spatial Correlations, and Randomization Inference. Journal of the American Statistical Association 107(498): 578-591.

       

      Faculty Fellow

      Fernando Ferreira

      x

      Associate Professor, Departments of Real Estate, and Business Economics and Public Policy

      About

      Fernando Ferreira is Associate Professor of Real Estate and Business Economics and Public Policy. His interests include public economics, urban economics, and real estate. He is also a Faculty Fellow and Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER), for which he co-edits the Journal of Public Economics. Ferreira has served as a visiting scholar at the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia and the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, and is the recipient of various research grants, including from the Ford Foundation and the U.S. Department of Education. 

      Selected Publications

      Ferreira, Fernando “What Drives Racial and Ethnic Differences in High Cost Mortgages? The Role of High Risk Lenders”, with Patrick Bayer and Stephen Ross. Forthcoming. Review of Financial Studies.

      Ferreira, Fernando, Patrick Bayer, and Stephen Ross. 2016. “The Vulnerability of Minority Homeowners in the Housing Boom and Bust.” American Economic Journal: Economic Policy 8(1).

      Ferreira, Fernando and Joseph Gyourko. 2014. “Does Gender Matter for Political Leadership? The Case of U.S. Mayors.” Journal of Public Economics 112: 24-39.

      Ferreira, Fernando, Leah Platt Boustan, Hernan Winkler, and Eric Zolt. 2013. “The Effect of Rising Income Inequality on Taxation and Public Expenditures: Evidence from U.S. Municipalities and School Districts, 1970-2000.” Review of Economics and Statistics 95(4): 1291-1302.

      Penn IUR Scholar

      Richard Florida

      x

      Director of Business and Creativity, The Martin Prosperity Institute, Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto

      Global Research Professor, New York University

      Areas of Interest

        About

        Richard Florida is Director of the Martin Prosperity Institute at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management and a Global Research Professor at New York University. He previously taught at Carnegie Mellon University and George Mason University.  Florida is one of the world’s leading public intellectuals on economic competitiveness, demographic trends, and cultural and technological innovation. He is also Senior Editor at The Atlantic, where he co-founded and serves as Editor-at-Large for The Atlantic Cities, as well as the Creative Class Group. He is the author of several best-selling books including his award-winning book The Rise of the Creative Class.

        Selected Publications

        Florida, Richard. 2017. The New Urban Crisis: How Our Cities Are Increasing Inequality, Deepening Segregation, and Failing the Middle Class—and What We Can Do About It. New York: Basic Books. 

        Florida, Richard. 2010. The Great Reset: How the Post-Crash Economy Will Change the Way We Live and Work. New York: HarperCollins.

        Florida, Richard. 2009. Who’s Your City?: How the Creative Economy Is Making Where to Live the Most Important Decision of Your Life. New York: Basic Books.

        Florida, Richard. 2005. The Flight of the Creative Class: The New Global Competition for Talent. New York: HarperCollins.

        Florida, Richard. 2002. The Rise of the Creative Class. New York: Basic Books.

        Penn IUR Scholar

        Matthew Freedman

        x

        Associate Professor of Economics, Drexel University

        Areas of Interest

          About

          Matthew Freedman is an Associate Professor of Economics at Drexel University. His research interests lie at the intersection of labor economics, public finance, and urban economics. His current work examines how federal, state, and local housing and economic development programs affect neighborhoods. His research also explores segregation within cities and the local labor, capital, and housing market dynamics that give rise to differential patterns of inequality across metropolitan areas. Freedman was previously an Associate Professor of Economics at Cornell University and has held visiting positions at the Wharton School and Princeton University. Freedman’s research has been published in leading economics and urban studies journals including the Economic Journal, the Journal of Urban Economics, the Journal of Public Economics, the Journal of Human Resources, and the Journal of Economic Geography.

          Selected Publications

          Freedman, Matthew, N. Baum-Snow and R. Pavan. Forthcoming. Why Has Urban Inequality Increased? American Economic Journal: Applied Economics.

          Freedman, Matthew, E. Owens and S. Bohn. Forthcoming. Immigration, Employment Opportunities, and Criminal Behavior. American Economic Journal: Economic Policy.

          Freedman, Matthew. 2017. Persistence in Industrial Policy Impacts: Evidence from Depression-Era Mississippi. Journal of Urban Economics, 102: 34-51.

          Freedman, Matthew. 2013. “Targeted Business Incentives and Local Labor Markets.” Journal of Human Resources 48(2): 311-344.

          Freedman, Matthew. 2012. “Teaching New Markets Old Tricks: The Effects of Subsidized Investment on Low-Income Neighborhoods.” Journal of Public Economics 96(11-12): 1000-1014.

          Freedman, Matthew and Renata Kosova. 2012. “Agglomeration, Product Heterogeneity, and Firm Entry.” Journal of Economic Geography.” 12(3): 601-626.

          Affiliated PhD Student

          Ari Friedman

          x

          MD/PhD Candidate in Health Economics, University of Pennsylvania

          About

          Ari B. Friedman is a Fellow at the Leonard Davis Institute and a sixth-year M.D./Ph.D. student in health economics at the University of Pennsylvania's Perelman School of Medicine and the Wharton School. His research interests include the industrial organization of the unscheduled care system (primary care clinics, urgent care and retail clinics, and emergency departments), access to care and insurance, and financially integrating population health into the medical system. His work has been cited more than 600 times, with an h-index of 8.

          Selected Publications

          Friedman AB. Comment on Economic Incentives and Use of the Intensive Care Unit. JAMA 2014. 311(22):2336-2337.

          Rhodes KV, Kenney GM, Friedman AB, Saloner B, Lawson CC, Chearo D, Wissoker D, Polsky D. Primary Care Access for New Patients on the Eve of Health Care Reform. JAMA Int Med 2014.

          Becker NV, Friedman AB. Emergency Department, Heal Thyself. Am J Emerg Med 2014. 32(2):175-177.

          Friedman AB, Mendola T. To Cover Their Child, One Couple Navigates A Health Insurance Maze In Pennsylvania. Health Affairs2013. 32(5):994-997.

          Friedman AB, Becker N. Understanding the Individual Mandate's SCOTUS Pivot Points. LDI Health Economist. April 2012.VIDEO

          Penn IUR Scholar

          Edward Glaeser

          x

          Fred and Eleanor Glimp Professor of Economics, Harvard University

          Areas of Interest

            About

            Ed Glaeser is the Fred and Eleanor Glimp Professor of Economics at Harvard, where he also serves as Director of the Taubman Center for State and Local Government and the Rappaport Institute for Greater Boston. He studies the economics of cities, and has written widely on urban issues, including the growth of cities, segregation, crime, and housing markets. He has been particularly interested in the role that geographic proximity can play in creating knowledge and innovation. 

            Selected Publications

            Glaeser, Edward L. 2011. Triumph of the City. New York: Penguin Press. 

            Glaeser, Edward L. "Wealth and the Self-Protection Society." In 100 Years: Leading Economists Predict the Future. Ed. Ignacio Palacios-Huerta. MIT Press, 2014.

            Glaeser, Edward L. "Urban Public Finance." Handbook in Public Economics.Ed. Alan J. Auerbach, Raj Chetty, Martin Feldstein, and Emmanuel Saez. Elsevier B.V., 2013.

            Glaeser, Edward L., Christopher F. Chabris, James J. Lee, Daniel J. Benjamin, Jonathan P. Beauchamp, Gregoire Borst, Steven Pinker, and David I. Laibson. "Why It Is Hard to Find Genes Associated with Social Science Traits: Theoretical and Empirical Considerations." American Journal of Public Health 103.S1 (October 2013): S152-S166.

            Glaeser, Edward L., Steve Poftak, and Kristina Tobio. "What Do Parents Want? An Exploration of School Preferences Expressed by Boston Parents." HKS Faculty Research Working Paper Series RWP13-024, July 2013.

            Glaeser, Edward L. "A World of Cities: The Causes and Consequences of Urbanization in Poorer Countries." National Bureau of Economic Research, December 2013.

            Fellow

            Laurie Goodman

            x

            Co-Director, Housing Finance Policy Center, Urban Institute

            Areas of Interest

              About

              Laurie Goodman is codirector of the Housing Finance Policy Center at the Urban Institute. The center is dedicated to providing policymakers with data-driven analyses of housing finance policy issues that they can depend on for relevance, accuracy, and independence. Before joining Urban in 2013, Goodman spent 30 years as an analyst and research department manager at a number of Wall Street firms. From 2008 to 2013, she was a senior managing director at Amherst Securities Group, LP, where her strategy effort became known for its analysis of housing policy issues. From 1993 to 2008, Goodman was head of global fixed income research and manager of US securitized products research at UBS and predecessor firms, which were ranked number one by Institutional Investor for 11 straight years. Before that, she was a senior fixed income analyst, a mortgage portfolio manager, and a senior economist at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York. She was inducted into the Fixed Income Analysts Hall of Fame in 2009. Goodman is on the board of directors of MFA Financial, is an advisor to Amherst Capital Management, and is a member of the Bipartisan Policy Center’s Housing Commission, the Federal Reserve Bank of New York’s Financial Advisory Roundtable, and the New York State Mortgage Relief Incentive Fund Advisory Committee. She has published more than 200 journal articles and has coauthored and coedited five books. Goodman has a BA in mathematics from the University of Pennsylvania and an MA and PhD in economics from Stanford University.

              Caitlin Gorback

              x

              PhD Candidate, Applied Economics, The Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania

              School/Department

              Areas of Interest

                About

                Caitlin is a fourth year doctoral student in the applied economics PhD program in the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania. Her interests span household and housing finance, real estate economics, and urban economics. Current work includes transportation infrastructure’s impact on commercial and residential rent gradients, how mortgage lenders incorporate neighborhood information updating into lending models, and the implications of young households’ participation in mortgage markets. More generally, she is interested in urban renewal and gentrification, affordable housing, and the demographic drivers of local housing markets. Prior to Wharton, Caitlin earning a B.S. in Economics from Duke University and worked in capital markets research at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York. 

                Penn IUR Scholar

                Richard K. Green

                x

                Director, University of Southern California Lusk Center for Real Estate; Lusk Chair in Real Estate

                Professor, USC Sol Price School of Public Policy and the Marshall School of Business, University of Southern California

                Areas of Interest

                  About

                  Richard K. Green is the Director of the University of Southern California (USC) Lusk Center for Real Estate. Green is also the Lusk Chair in Real Estate and Professor at both the USC Sol Price School of Public Policy and the Marshall School of Business. Before joining USC, Green was the Oliver T. Carr Jr., Chair of Real Estate Finance at the George Washington University School of Business. He also taught real estate finance and economics courses at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and was principal economist and director of financial strategy and policy analysis at Freddie Mac. More recently, Green was a Visiting Professor of Real Estate at the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School. Green’s areas of expertise include real estate, housing markets, real estate finance and economics, mortgage finance, land policy, urban policy, transportation, tax policy, and housing policy. He is a member of two academic journal editorial boards and a reviewer for several others. 

                  Selected Publications

                  Green, Richard, and P. Hendershott. Forthcoming/ Separating the Impacts of Age and Birth Date on Retail Sales; Journal of Shopping Center Research.

                  Green, Richard, and J. Schuetz. 2014. Is The Art Market More Bourgeois Than Bohemian?; Journal of Regional Science, 54(2,):273–303.

                  Green, Richard K. 2011. Thoughts on Rental Housing Market and Policy. Cityscape, A Journal of Policy, Development and Research, 13(2).

                  Green, Richard K. and A. Reschovsky. 2011. “Using Tax Policy to Subsidize Homeownership.” In Public Spending and Incentives for Community Development Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, Aspen Institute, A. Staiger, ed.

                  Green, R., and Susan Wachter. 2008. The Housing Finance Revolution (Proceedings of the 31st Annual Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City Economic Symposium).

                  Bring our latest initiatives, publications and events to your inbox.