People

Penn IUR is affiliated with more than 200 experts in the field of urbanism. Its Faculty Fellows program identifies faculty at the University of Pennsylvania with a demonstrated interest in urban research; the Penn IUR Scholars program identifies urban scholars outside of Penn; and the Penn IUR Fellows program identifies expert urban practitioners. Together, these programs foster a community of scholars and encourage cross-disciplinary collaboration.

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Faculty Fellow

Mauro Guillén

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Dr. Felix Zandman Professor of International Management

Director, Lauder Institute

About

Mauro Guillén is the Dr. Felix Zandman Professor of International Management and Director of The Lauder Institute at The Wharton School. His research interests include organizational theory, economic sociology, international management, international banking strategies, and emerging economies. He previously taught at the MIT Sloan School of Management. He is a member of the advisory board of the Escuela de Finanzas Aplicadas (Grupo Analistas), and serves on the World Economic Forum’s Global Agenda Council on Emerging Multinationals. He has received a Wharton MBA Core Teaching Award, a Wharton Graduate Association Teaching Award, a Wharton Teaching Commitment and Curricular Innovation Award, the Gulf Publishing Company Best Paper Award of the Academy of Management, the W. Richard Scott Best Paper Award of the American Sociological Association, the Gustavus Myers Center Award for Outstanding Book on Human Rights, and the President’s Book Award of the Social Science History Association. Guillén is an Elected Fellow of the Macro Organizational Behavior Society, a former Guggenheim and Fulbright Fellow, and a Member in the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton. 

Selected Publications

Guillen, Mauro. 2016. The Architecture of Collapse: The Global System in the 21st Century. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016.

Berges, Angel, Mauro Guillen, Juan Pedro Moreno, and Emilio Ontiveros. 2014. A New Era in Banking: The Landscape after the Battle. Brookline, MA: Bibliomotion.

Guillen, Mauro and Laurence Capron. 2015. “State Capacity, Minority Shareholder Protections, and Stock Market Development.” Administrative Science Quarterly 61(1):125-160.

Heather Berry, Mauro Guillen, and Arun S. Hendi. 2014. “Is there Convergence across Countries? A Spatial Approach.” Journal of International Business Studies 45: 387-404.

Guillen, Mauro, editor. 2013. Women Entrepreneurs: Inspiring Stories from Developing Countries and Emerging Economies. New York: Routledge.

Fellow

Daniel Hartley

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Research Economist, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland

About

Daniel Hartley is a Research Economist in the Research Department of the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland. He is primarily interested in urban/regional economics and labor economics. His current work focuses on gentrification, public housing, neighborhood housing market dynamics, and household finance. Raised in the Hyde Park neighborhood on the South Side of Chicago, Hartley has always had a deep appreciation of cities. His prior employment includes a three-year spell as a software developer, and summer jobs in various research areas including electrical engineering and asset management.

Selected Publications

Guerrieri, V., D. Hartley, and E. Hurst. 2013. Endogenous Gentrification and Housing Price Dynamics. Journal of Public Economics, 100: 45-60.

Guerrieri, V., D. Hartley, and E. Hurst. 2012. Within-city Variation in Urban Decline: The Case of Detroit. American Economic Review - Papers and Proceedings, 102(3): 120-126.

Hartley, D. and K. Fee. 2013. “The Relationship between City Center Density and Urban Growth or Decline.” In Revitalizing American Cities, Susan Wachter and Kimberly Zeuli, eds. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.

Aliprantis, D. and D. Hartley. Blowing It Up and Knocking It Down: The Local and City-Wide Effects of Demolishing High Concentration Public Housing on Crime. (Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland Working Paper). http://www.clevelandfed.org/research/workpaper/2010/wp1022r.pdf.

Fellow

Andrew F. Haughwout

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Senior Vice President and Function Head, Microeconomic Studies Function, Federal Reserve Bank of New York

Areas of Interest

    About

    Andy F. Haughwout is a Senior Vice President and Function Head of the Microeconomic Studies Function at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York. He is the Group's Senior Administrative Officer and a co-editor of the Liberty Street Economics blog. In addition to his duties at the Bank, he serves on a Transportation Research Board panel investigating the value of transportation spending as economic stimulus. He is a past Chair of the North American Regional Science Council and the Federal Reserve System Committee on Regional Analysis and serves on the Advisory Board of the Journal of Regional Science. Prior to joining the New York Fed, Haughwout served as Assistant Professor at Princeton University. 

    Penn IUR Scholar

    Harry J. Holzer

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    Professor of Public Policy, McCourt School of Public Policy at Georgetown

    Areas of Interest

      About

      Harry J. Holzer is a Professor of Public Policy in the McCourt School of Public Policy at Georgetown University. He is also an Institute Fellow at the American Institutes for Research. Since receiving his Ph.D. in economics from Harvard in 1983, Holzer has also served as a Professor of Economics at Michigan State University, the Chief Economist of the U.S. Department of Labor (in the Clinton Administration),  and an Institute Fellow at the Urban Institute. He has been the co-founder and co-director of the Georgetown Center on Poverty, Inequality, and Public Policy. He serves on the Board of Directors of the National Skills Coalition and the Economic Mobility Corporation. Holzer has authored or edited eleven books and has published several dozen articles in peer-reviewed journals, focusing mostly on the low-wage labor market. His policy interests include workforce development, EEO and affirmative action, the Earned Income Tax Credit, Pell Grant reform, immigration reform, and removing barriers to work for ex-offenders.

      Selected Publications

      Holzer, Harry J. and Sandy Baum. 2017. Making College Work: Pathways to Success for Disadvantaged Students. Brookings Press.

      Holzer, Harry J. Julia Lane, David Rosenblum, and Fredrik Andersson. 2011. Where Are All the Good Jobs Going? New York: Russell Sage Foundation.

      Edelman, Peter B., Harry J. Holzer, and Paul Offner. 2006. Reconnecting Disadvantaged Young Men. Washington, DC: The Urban Institute.

      Andersson, Fredrik, Harry J. Holzer, and Julia Lane. 2005. Moving Up or Moving On: Who Advances in the Low-Wage Labor Market. Russell Sage Foundation.

      Holzer, Harry J. 1999. What Employers Want: Job Prospects for Less-educated Workers. New York: Russell Sage Foundation.

      Freeman, Richard B. and Harry J. Holzer, eds. 1986. The Black Youth Employment Crisis. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

      Affiliated PhD Student

      Ben Hyman

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      PhD Candidate, Applied Economics, The Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania

      Areas of Interest

        About

        Ben Hyman is a doctoral candidate in Applied Economics at the Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania, affiliated with the Departments of Business Economics & Public Policy and Real Estate. Ben's research interests span the fields of public finance, local labor markets, urban economics, and international trade. Ben received his B.A. (Honors) from the University of Southern California (USC), and holds an M.C.P. with a concentration in urban and regional economics from MIT. Prior to graduate school, he worked as a research associate with MIT's poverty action lab (J-PAL). Ben's current research focuses on two streams of work. The first concerns whether worker re-training programs help mitigate the adverse effects of local labor market disruptions. The second agenda studies the effects of state and local tax credit incentives on firm behavior and labor demand.

        Selected Publications

        Can Displaced Labor be Retrained? Evidence from Quasi-Random Assignment to Trade Adjustment Assistance (2017) [Work-in-progress]

        Firm Mobility and the Economic Development Effects of Location Subsidies: Evidence from a Large-Scale Tax Credit Lottery (2017) [Work-in-progress]

        Harrison, A., Hyman, B., Martin, L., & Nataraj, S. (2015). When do Firms Go Green? Comparing Price Incentives with Command and Control Regulations in India (No. w21763). National Bureau of Economic Research.

        Faculty Fellow

        Robert P. Inman

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        Richard King Mellon Professor of Finance

        Professor of Business Economics and Public Policy

        Professor of Real Estate

        School/Department

        Areas of Interest

          About

          Robert P. Inman is the Richard King Mellon Professor of Finance, Professor of Business Economics and Public Policy, and Professor of Real Estate at the Wharton School. His primary research interests include public finance, urban fiscal policy, and political economy. He is a Research Associate for the National Bureau of Economic Research and a Visiting Senior Research Economist for the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia. He has advised the City of Philadelphia, the State of Pennsylvania, U.S. Treasury, U.S. Department of Education, U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, Republic of South Africa, National Bank of Sri Lanka, and others on matters of fiscal policy. 

          Selected Publications

          Carlino, Gerald and Robert P Inman. 2016. “Fiscal Stimulus in Economic Unions: What Role for States?” Tax Policy and the Economy 30(1).

          Inman, Robert P. and Daniel L. Rubinfeld. 2013. “Understanding the Democratic Transition in South Africa.” American Law and Economics Review 15(1): 1-38.

          Inman, Robert, ed. 2009. Making Cities Work: Prospects and Policies for Urban America. Princeton: Princeton University Press.

          Inman, Robert P. 2008. “Federalism’s Values and the Value of Federalism.” NBER Working Paper No. 13735.

          Craig, Steven, Andrew Haughwout, Robert P. Inman, and Thomas Luce. 2004. “Local Revenue Hills: Evidence from Four U.S. Cities.” The Review of Economics and Statistics 86(2): 570-585.  

          Faculty Fellow

          Roberta Iversen

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          Associate Professor

          About

          Roberta Iversen is Associate Professor in the School of Social Policy & Practice. She uses ethnographic research to extend knowledge about economic mobility, especially in urban families who are working but still poor and recently in exurban middle-income families as well. Her ethnographic accounts illuminate what low-income working parents need from secondary schools, job training organizations, businesses and firms, their children’s public schools, and public policy in order to earn enough to support their families through work. Housing policy in Milwaukee, WI and workforce development programs and policy in New Orleans, LA, Seattle, WA, St. Louis, MO, and Philadelphia, PA have been improved by findings from Iversen's research. Iversen is also working on a book manuscript, tentatively called Everyday Works in the Land of (Limited) Opportunity. . The book, based on qualitative research she has conducted since the 1980s, examines the experiences of individuals and families with labor-market work in relation to changes in the labor market over time. It concludes by proposing new ideas about "work" -- including redefining what counts as "work" in the U.S.

          Selected Publications

          Parsons Leigh, J., A. Gauthier, R.R. Iversen, S. Luhr, L. and Napolitano. 2016. “Caught in between: Neoliberal rhetoric and middle-income families in Canada and the United States.” Journal of Family Studies.

          Iversen, R. R., L. Napolitano, and F. F. Furstenberg. 2011. “Middle-income Families in the Economic Downturn: Challenges and Management Strategies over Time.” Longitudinal and Life Course Studies: International Journal 2(3): 286-300.

          Iversen, R. R. and A. L. Armstrong. 2008. “Hurricane Katrina and New Orleans: What Might an Embeddedness Perspective Offer Disaster Research and Planning?” Analyses of Social Issues and Public Policy 8(1): 183-209.

          Iversen, R. R. and A. L. Armstrong. 2006. Jobs Aren’t Enough: Toward a New Economic Mobility for Low-income Families. Philadelphia: Temple University Press.

          Iversen, R. R. 2002. Moving Up is a Steep Climb. Baltimore, MD: The Annie E. Casey Foundation.

          Penn IUR Scholar

          Brian A. Jacob

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          Walter H. Annenberg Professor of Education Policy, Professor of Economics, and Professor of Education, University of Michigan

          Areas of Interest

            About

            Brian Jacob is the Walter H. Annenberg Professor of Education Policy, Professor of Economics, and Professor of Education at the University of Michigan. He is Co-Director of the Education Policy Initiative (EPI) and former Director of the Center for Local, State and Urban Policy (CLOSUP), as well as a Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER). He has previously served as a policy analyst in the NYC Mayor's Office and taught middle school in East Harlem. His primary fields of interest are labor economics, program evaluation, and the economics of education. His current research focuses on school accountability, teacher labor markets and virtual schooling. In 2008, Jacob received the David N. Kershaw Prize, an award given every two years to honor persons who, at under the age of forty, have made a distinguished contribution to the field of public policy.

            Selected Publications

            Dee, T. S., B. A. Jacob, and Nathaniel L. Schwartz. Forthcoming. The Effects of No Child Left Behind on Education Finance and Practice. Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis.

            Jacob, Brian A., Ludwig, Jens and Douglas Miller 2013. The Effects of Housing and Neighborhood Conditions on Child Mortality. Journal of Health Economics, 32(1): 195-206.

            Jacob, Brian A.  2011. Do Principals Fire the Worst Teachers? Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis, 33(4): 403-434.

            Jacob, Brian A. and Jens Ludwig. 2011.  Educational Interventions: Their Effects on the Achievement of Poor Children.  In Neighborhood and Life Chances: How Place Matters in Modern America,  Harriet B. Newburger, Eugénie L. Birch, and Susan M. Wachter, eds. Philadelphia, PA: University of Pennsylvania Press.

            Cullen, J. and Jacob, B. 2008.  Is Gaining Access to a Selective Elementary School Gaining Ground?  Evidence from Randomized Lotteries. In An Economics Perspective on the Problems of Disadvantaged Youth Jonathan, Gruber, ed.  Chicago: University of Chicago Press. 

            Penn IUR Scholar

            Rucker C. Johnson

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            Associate Professor, Goldman School of Public Policy, University of California Berkeley

            Areas of Interest

              About

              Rucker C. Johnson is Associate Professor at the Goldman School of Public Policy at the University of California-Berkeley. Johnson is also a Faculty Research Fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research, a Faculty Research Fellow at the W.E.B. Du Bois Institute at Harvard, a Research Affiliate at the National Poverty Center at the University of Michigan, and a Research Affiliate at the Institute for Poverty Research at the University of Wisconsin. Johnson’s research is primarily concerned with the role of poverty and inequality in affecting life chances and opportunities. He looks at problems commonly associated with poverty such as low-wage labor markets, spatial mismatch, the societal consequences of incarceration, the impacts of childhood school and neighborhood quality on adult health and socioeconomic success, and educational attainment. 

              Selected Publications

              Johnson, Rucker C., Ariel Kalil, and Rachel Dunifon. 2010. Mothers’ Work and Children’s Lives: Low-income Families After Welfare Reform. Kalamazoo, MI: Upjohn Institute Press.

              Johnson, Rucker C. 2011. Health Dynamics and the Evolution of Health Inequality over the Life Course: The Importance of Neighborhood and Family Background. B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy: Advances.

              Johnson, Rucker C., Ariel Kalil, and Rachel Dunifon. 2011. Employment Patterns of Less-Skilled Workers: Links to Children’s Behavior and Academic Progress. Demography, 47(3).

              Johnson, Rucker C. 2010. The Health Returns of Education Policies: From Preschool to High School & Beyond. American Economic Review Papers and Proceedings.

              Penn IUR Scholar

              Matthew Kahn

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              Professor, Institute of the Environment, Department of Public Policy, Department of Economics, University of California-Los Angeles (UCLA)

              Areas of Interest

                About

                Matthew Kahn is a Professor in UCLA’s Institute of the Environment, Department of Public Policy, and Department of Economics. Kahn is also Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research, Fellow at the Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA), and serves as a non-resident scholar at the Urbanization Project at the NYU Stern School of Business. Kahn’s research largely focuses on environmental, urban, real estate, and energy economics. Kahn has published more than 90 papers and several books.

                Selected Publications

                Kahn, Matthew. 2016. Blue Skies Over Beijing: Economic Growth and the Environment in China joint with Siqi Zheng. Princeton University Press.

                Kahn, Matthew. 2010. Climatopolis: How Our Cities Will Thrive in the Hotter Future. New York: Basic Books.

                Costa, Dora L. and Matthew E. Kahn. 2008. Heroes and Cowards: The Social Face of War. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.

                Kahn, Matthew. 2006. Green Cities: Urban Growth and the Environment. Washington, DC: Urban Institute Press.

                Affiliated PhD Student

                Maryam Khojasteh

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                PhD Candidate, City and Regional Planning, School of Design, University of Pennslyvania

                About

                Maryam is a PhD student in the City and Regional Planning program at PennDesign. She is interested in community-based research that explores the intersection of public health, community food system and community economic development. She received her master degree in Urban Planning from SUNY at Buffalo. Prior to coming to Penn, she worked as a research associate at the Food Systems Planning and Healthy Communities Lab in Buffalo NY. She worked toward building the capacity of non-profit organizations and local governments to strengthen community food systems as well as coordinating on the ground health interventions to promote active living among school-aged children. Her current project explores the ways that immigrant food entrepreneurs impact the health and well-being of immigrants and receiving communities. 

                Selected Publications

                Khojasteh, Maryam, and Samina Raja. 2016. "Agents of Change: Role of Immigrants in Creating Healthier Food Environments." Journal of Hunger and Environmental Nutrition. 1-29

                Baek, So-Ra, Samina Raja, Nathan Attard, and Maryam Khojasteh. 2016. "Acculturating into (In)active Commuting to School: Differences among Children of Foreign-born and US-born parents." Children, Youth, and Environment 26 (1):37-55

                Penn IUR Scholar

                Kyung-Hwan Kim

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                Professor of Economics, Department of Economics, Sogang University

                Areas of Interest

                  About

                  Kyung-Hwan Kim is a Professor of Economics in the Department of Economics at Sogang University. He is also a Fellow at the Weimer Graduate School of Advanced Studies in Real Estate and Land Economics. Kim has been Director of the Economic Research Institute at Sogang University and a Principal Consultant for China CDS Performance Indicators Project with UN-Habitat. He has been a Visiting Professor at the University of Wisconsin and an Urban Finance Advisor at the United Nations Centre for Human Settlements. He is a member of the editorial boards of the Journal of Housing Economics and the International Real Estate Review. His research interests include Real Estate and Urban Economics, Spatial and Territorial Development Policies, Public Finance, and Environmental Economics. 

                  Selected Publications

                  Kim, Kyung-Hwan. 2004. Housing and the Korean Economy. Journal of Housing Economics, 13(4).

                  Kim, Kyung-Hwan. 2004. Cross-Country Models of Housing Tenure, Rents and Asset Prices: The Effects of Regulations and Institutions. (Paper presented at the AREUEA International Conference, Fredericton, July).

                  Kim, Kyung-Hwan with Jae-Young Son. 2004. Spatial Policies Towards the Seoul Capital Region and Implications for Metropolitan Competitiveness. (Paper presented at International Seminar on Forward-looking Policies Towards the Capital Regions, Seoul, June).

                  Kim, Kyung-Hwan with C-H Kim. 2002. Compensation for Regulatory Takings in the Virtual Absence of Constitutional Provision: The Case of Korea. Journal of Housing Economics, 11: 108-124.

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