People

Penn IUR is affiliated with more than 200 experts in the field of urbanism. Its Faculty Fellows program identifies faculty at the University of Pennsylvania with a demonstrated interest in urban research; the Penn IUR Scholars program identifies urban scholars outside of Penn; and the Penn IUR Fellows program identifies expert urban practitioners. Together, these programs foster a community of scholars and encourage cross-disciplinary collaboration.

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Penn IUR Scholar

Paul A. Jargowsky

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Professor of Public Policy and Director, Center for Urban Research and Urban Education, Rutgers University

Senior Research Affiliate, National Poverty Center, University of Michigan

Areas of Interest

    About

    Paul A. Jargowsky is Professor of Public Policy and Director, Center for Urban Research and Urban Education at Rutgers University. His primary areas of research focus on racial and economic segregation, the impacts of economic and spatial inequality, and the origins and consequences of exclusionary suburban development patterns. Prior to his position as Professor of Public Policy at Rutgers University, he was the Project Director for the New York State Task Force on Poverty and Welfare Reform and was also involved in fair housing and desegregation litigation as a consultant and expert witness. Jargowsky contributed to the report of the Task Force, The New Social Contract: Rethinking the Nature and Purpose of Public Assistance, which was extremely influential in reshaping the welfare reform debate. His book Poverty and Place was recognized as the “Best Book in Urban Affairs Published in 1997 or 1998” by the Urban Affairs Association.

    Selected Publications

    Jargowsky, Paul A. and Beth Rabinowitz. Forthcoming. Rethinking Coup Risk: Rural Coalitions and Coup-proofing in Sub-Saharan Africa. Armed Forces and Society.

    Jargowsky, Paul A., 2016. Are Minority Neighborhoods a Disaster? Commentary, Race and Inequality, Century Foundation. 

    Jargowsky, Paul A. and Jeongdai Kim. 2009. The Information Theory of Segregation: Uniting Segregation and Inequality in a Common Framework, Research on Economic Inequality, 17: 3-31.

    Kim, Jeongdai and Paul A. Jargowsky. 2009. The GINI Coefficient and Segregation on a Continuous Variable. Research on Economic Inequality, 17: 1129-1151.

    Jargowsky, Paul A. 2003. Stunning Progress, Hidden Problems: The Dramatic Decline of Concentrated Poverty in the 1990s. Washington, DC: The Brookings Institution.

    Jargowsky, Paul A. 1997. Poverty and Place: Ghettos, Barrios, and the American City. New York: Russell Sage Foundation.

    Affiliated PhD Student

    Elaine Leigh

    x

    Doctoral Candidate, Graduate School of Education, University of Pennsylvania

    School/Department

    Areas of Interest

      About

      Elaine Leigh is a first-year Ph.D. Student in Higher Education at Penn GSE. Her research interests include college access and success, diversity in higher education, and K-16 state and federal policies impacting educational preparation pipelines. Previously, Elaine was Director of Support Services at Steppingstone Scholars, a Philadelphia nonprofit that prepares educationally underserved students for college and career success. In this role, Elaine developed and led several key initiatives including an annual citywide college conference, two summer academic learning programs, and school-year programming involving tutoring, mentoring, career development, college readiness, and individual college counseling. As a Teach For America alumna, Elaine began her career in education teaching middle school science in the School District of Philadelphia and also served as a college counselor for ASPIRA’s TRIO Talent Search program. Additionally, Elaine stays engaged in the Philadelphia community as a board member for SEAMAAC, an immigrant and refugee social service agency, and has previously served on the boards of PhilaSoup and The Spruce Foundation. A native of Seattle, WA, Elaine holds a B.A. in Psychology from the University of Washington and M.S.Ed. in Urban Education from the University of Pennsylvania.

      Faculty Fellow

      Walter Licht

      x

      Walter H. Annenberg Professor of History

      About

      Walter Licht is Walter H. Annenberg Professor of History in the School of Arts and Sciences. His expertise lies in the history of work and labor markets and he teaches courses in American economic and labor history. Licht began teaching at Penn in 1977. He has received the Ira Abrams Memorial Prize for Distinguished Teaching awarded by the School of Arts and Sciences and many grants and fellowships to pursue his scholarly interests. He has previously been Undergraduate Chair of the Department of History, Graduate Chair, and Chair. He also served as Associate Dean in the School of Arts and Sciences for ten years, responsible for graduate education, social science departments, area studies programs, and research and education centers. He is currently Faculty Director of Civic House and the Penn Civic Scholars Program. Licht is now working on a book entitled American Capitalisms: A Global History.

      Selected Publications

      Dublin, Thomas and Walter Licht. 2005. The Face of Decline: The Pennsylvania Anthracite Region in the Twentieth Century. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press.

      Licht, Walter. 1995. Industrializing America: The Nineteenth Century. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press.

      Licht, Walter. 1992. Getting Work: Philadelphia, 1840-1950. Cambridge: Harvard University Press.

      Scranton, Phillip and Walter Licht. 1986. Work Sights: Industrial Philadelphia, 1890-1950. Philadelphia: Temple University Press.

      Licht, Walter. 1983. Working For The Railroad: The Organization of Work in the Nineteenth Century. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.

      Faculty Fellow

      Rebecca Maynard

      x

      University Trustee Professor of Education and Social Policy

      About

      Rebecca Maynard is University Trustee Professor of Education and Social Policy in the Education Policy Division of the Graduate School of Education. She is a leading expert in the design and conduct of randomized controlled trials in the areas of education and social policy. She has conducted influential methodological research, recently published open-ware tools to support the efficient design of rigorous impact evaluations, and been a leader in the development and application of methods for conducting systematic reviews of evidence on program effectiveness. She is a Fellow of the American Education Research Association; Past President of the Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management; recipient of the Peter H. Rossi Award for Contributions to the Theory and Practice of Program Evaluation (2009); co-recipient of the Society of Prevention Research Public Service Award (2008); and recipient of the Best Book Award, Society for Research on Adolescents (1998). Her current research projects range from an international comparative study of strategies for preparing secondary school math and science teachers to studies of innovative strategies for preparing low-skilled young adults for the workforce both in the United States and in developing countries. She recently returned to Penn following a two-year leave to serve as Commissioner of the National Center for Education Evaluation and Regional Assistance at the Institute of Education Sciences. 

      Selected Publications

      Maynard, Rebecca, Naomi Goldstein, and Demetra Smith Nightingale. 2016. “Program and Policy Evaluations in Practice: Highlights from the Federal Perspective.” New Directions for Evaluation Winter (152): 109-135.

      Granger, Robert C. and Rebecca Maynard. 2015. “Unlocking the Potential of the ‘What Works’ Approach to Policymaking and Practice.” American Journal of Evaluation 36(4): 558- 569.

      Maynard, Rebecca, and Larry Orr. 2015. “Social Experiments.” In International Encyclopedia of the Social and Behavioral Sciences. Amsterdam: Elsevier.

      Hoffman, S., and R. Maynard, eds. 2008. Kids Having Kids: Economic Costs and Social Consequences of Teen Pregnancy, 2nd Edition. Washington, DC: Urban Institute Press.

      Faculty Fellow

      Afaf Meleis

      x

      Dean Emerita and Professor of Nursing and Sociology

      About

      Afaf Meleis is Dean Emeritus and Professor of Nursing and Sociology in the Department of Family and Community Health in the School of Nursing. Her scholarship is focused on global health, immigrant and international health, women’s health, and on the theoretical development of the nursing discipline. She is the author of more than 175 articles about women’s health in developing countries, transitions theory, doctoral education in nursing, and interprofessional education in social sciences, nursing, and medical journals; over forty chapters; seven books; and numerous monographs and proceedings.

      Meleis is a sought-after keynote speaker for national and international conferences on women’s health and development, disparities in healthcare, and international health. She has been invited for visiting professorships, and to conduct symposia, present keynote addresses, serve on boards, plan conferences, and consult on women’s health research and doctoral education nationally and internationally (in Asia, Africa, Europe, Australia, South America and North America). Prior to coming to Penn, Meleis was on the nursing faculty of at the University of California, Los Angeles and the University of California, San Francisco for thirty-four years.

      She is a Fellow of the Royal College of Nursing in the UK, the American Academy of Nursing, and the College of Physicians of Philadelphia; a member of the Institute of Medicine, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Nurse Faculty Scholar National Advisory Committee, the Josiah Macy Jr. Foundation Macy Faculty Scholars program, and the George W. Bush Presidential Center Women’s Initiative Policy Advisory Council; and the National Institutes of Health Advisory Committee on Research on Women’s Health; a Board Member of CARE, and the Consortium of Universities for Global Health; co-chair of the IOM Global Forum on Innovation for Health Professional Education and the Harvard School of Public Health-Penn Nursing-Lancet Commission on Women and Health. Meleis is also President Emerita and Counsel General Emerita of the International Council on Women's Health Issues (ICOWHI) and the former Global Ambassador for the Girl Child Initiative of the International Council of Nurses (ICN).  

      Selected Publications

      Meleis, A.I., and C.G. Glickman. 2014. “A passion in nursing for justice and equity: Thoughts for the future using our past.” In Philosophies and Practices of Emancipatroy Nursing: Social Justice as Praxis, edited by P.N. Kagan, M.C. Smith, and P. Chinn. New York: Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group.

      Meleis, A.I., and M. Meleis. 2012. “People of Egyptian heritage.” In Transcultural health care: A culturally competent approach, 4th Edition, edited by L.D. Purnell and B.J. Paulanka. Philadelphia, PA: F.A. Davis.

      Meleis, A.I., and K.L. Schumacher. 2011. “Transitions and health.” In Encyclopedia of Nursing Research, 3rd Edition, edited by J.J. Fitzpatrick and M. Wallace Kazer. New York, NY: Springer.

      Meleis, A.I., E. Birch, and S. Wachter, eds. 2011. Women's Health and the World's Cities. Philadelphia, PA: University of Pennsylvania Press.

      Faculty Fellow

      Laura Perna

      x

      James S. Riepe Professor

      Founding Executive Director, Penn AHEAD

      Chair, Higher Education Division

      School/Department

      Areas of Interest

        About

        Laura Perna is James S. Riepe Professor and Chair of Higher Education Division in the Graduate School of Education and Founding Executive Director of the Alliance for Higher Education and Democracy (Penn AHEAD). She is also serving as past chair of the Faculty Senate at the University of Pennsylvania, chair of the Higher Education Division of the Graduate School of Education, faculty fellow of the Institute for Urban Research, faculty affiliate of the Penn Wharton Public Policy Initiative, and member of the advisory board for the Netter Center for Community Partnerships. She holds bachelor’s degrees in economics and psychology from the University of Pennsylvania, and earned her master’s in public policy and Ph.D. in education from the University of Michigan. She has held leadership positions in the primary national associations in the field of higher education administration. Dr. Perna served as President of the Association for the Study of Higher Education (ASHE) from 2014 to 2015 and Vice President of the American Educational Research Association’s Division J (Postsecondary Education) from 2010 to 2013 and now is a member of the AERA Grants Governing Board. Her research examines the ways that social structures, educational practices, and public policies promote and limit college access and success, particularly for individuals from lower-income families and racial/ethnic minority groups.

        Selected Publications

        Perna, L.W., and N. Hillman, eds. 2017. “Understanding student debt: Who borrows, the consequences of borrowing, and the implications for federal policy.” The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science 671.

        Cahalan, M., L.W. Perna, M. Yamashita, R. Ruiz, and K. Franklin. 2017. Indicators of higher education equity in the United States: An historic trend report. Washington, DC: The Pell Institute of the Council for Opportunity in Education and the Alliance for Higher Education and Democracy.

        Perna, L.W. and R. Ruiz. 2016. “Technology: The solution to higher education’s pressing problems?” In American Higher Education in the Twenty-First Century, edited by P. Altbach, P. Gumport, and M. Bastedo.. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press.

        Perna, L.W. 2016. “Throwing down the gauntlet: Ten ways to ensure the future of our research.” Review of Higher Education: 319-338.

        Perna, Laura. 2012. Preparing Today’s Students for Tomorrow’s Jobs in Metropolitan America: The Policy, Practice, and Research Issues. Philadelphia, PA: University of Pennsylvania Press. 

        Faculty Fellow

        John Puckett

        x

        Professor of Education

        About

        John Puckett is Professor of Education in the Literacy, Culture, and International Education Division of the Graduate School of Education. His background includes six years of teaching and administrative work in public and private secondary schools in North Carolina, Georgia, and Florida. Before coming to Penn in 1987, Puckett was Director of Research and Development for REAL Enterprises, a non-profit organization that helped catalyze school-based economic development projects nationwide. He served as Associate Dean of the Graduate School of Education from 1998 to 2004 and again in 2006 to 2007. He currently chairs the School’s Policy, Measurement, and Evaluation Division. Since coming to Penn, he has been actively involved in building University partnerships with West Philadelphia schools; from 1987 to 1991, he worked with Ira Harkavy to develop the University of Pennsylvania’s Center for Community Partnerships, now called the Netter Center. In conjunction with the Netter Center and the School of Arts and Sciences’ Urban Studies Program, he teaches academically based community service seminars that focus on school- and neighborhood-improvement projects in West Philadelphia. 

        Selected Publications

        John L. Puckett and Mark Frazier Lloyd. 2015. Becoming Penn: The Pragmatic American University, 1950-2000. Philadelphia, PA: University of Pennsylvania Press.

        Puckett, J. L. and M.F. Lloyd. 2013. “Penn’s great expansion: Postwar urban renewal and the alliance between private universities and the public sector.” Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography 137(4): 381–430.

        Puckett, J. L., L. Benson, and I. Harkavy. 2007. Dewey’s Dream: Universities and Democracies in an Age of Education Reform. Philadelphia: Temple University Press.

        Puckett, J. L. and M. C. Johanek. 2007. Leonard Covello and the Making of Benjamin Franklin High School: Education as if Citizenship Mattered. Philadelphia: Temple University Press.

        Puckett, J. L. 1989. Foxfire Reconsidered: A Twenty-Year Experiment in Progressive Education. Urbana: University of Illinois Press. 

        Fellow

        Aromar Revi

        x

        Director, Indian Institute for Human Settlements (IIHS)

        Areas of Interest

          About

          Aromar Revi is Director of the Indian Institute for Human Settlements (IIHS) India’s prospective independent national University for Research & Innovation addressing its challenges of urbanisation, through an integrated programme of education, research, practice and training. He is an alumnus of IIT-Delhi and the Law and Management Schools of the University of Delhi. He is also a Fellow of the India-China Institute at the New School University, New York.

          Emerging Scholar

          Claire Robertson-Kraft

          x

          Post-doctoral Fellow and Associate Director, Operation Public Education, The University of Pennsylvania

          School/Department

          Areas of Interest

            About

            Claire Robertson-Kraft earned her Ph.D. in education policy and is currently a post-doctoral fellow and the Associate Director of Operation Public Education at The University of Pennsylvania. She is the co-editor of A Grand Bargain for Education Reform: New Rewards and Supports for New Accountability (Harvard Education Press, 2009), which provides a comprehensive framework for evaluating, compensating, and developing teachers. Her research focuses on how these policies influence teachers’ motivation, effectiveness, and retention.

            After graduating from undergrad at Penn in 2004, Claire worked with Teach For America in Houston, first as a third grade teacher and then as a program director supporting elementary and special education teachers. It was during her time as a classroom teacher that she built the passion she has today for working in urban education. Claire is also very active in the civic community. She is the Co-Founder and current President of PhillyCORE Leaders and serves on the boards of Youth Build Philadelphia, Leadership Philadelphia and WHYY. In 2011, she was selected as one of the New Faces of Philly by Philadelphia Magazine, and in 2013, she received the Forum Award for Emerging Executive Women. 

            Selected Publications

            Robertson-Kraft, C. (2014). Teachers’ motivational responses to new evaluation policies. Paper presented at the 2014 Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

            Robertson-Kraft, C., & Duckworth, A. L. (2014). True grit: Trait-level perseverance and passion for long-term goals predicts effectiveness and retention among novice teachers. Teachers College Record.

            Cucchiara, M., Rooney, E., & Robertson-Kraft, C. (2013). I’ve never seen people work so hard! Teachers’ working conditions in the early stages of school turnaround.  Urban Education Journal.

            Robertson-Kraft, C. (2013). Professional unionism: Redefining the role. In M. B. Katz, & M. Rose (Eds.), Public education under siege. Philadelphia, PA: University of Pennsylvania Press. 

            Hershberg, T., & Robertson-Kraft, C. (Eds.). (2009). A grand bargain for education reform: New rewards and supports for new accountability. Cambridge, MA: Harvard Education Press.

            Penn IUR Scholar

            Jesse Rothstein

            x

            Professor of Public Policy and Economics, University of California Berkeley

            Director, Institute for Research on Labor and Employment

            Areas of Interest

              About

              Jesse Rothstein is Associate Professor at the Goldman School of Public Policy and the Department of Economics at the University of California, Berkeley and a research associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research. His research spans topics including local public finance, school and teacher accountability and performance measurement, higher education admissions, racial gaps in educational and economic outcomes, and tax and transfer policy. From 2003 to 2009, Rothstein was an Assistant Professor of Economics and Public Affairs at Princeton University. In 2009-2010, he served as Senior Economist for labor and education at the Council of Economic Advisers and then as Chief Economist at the US Department of Labor.  His work has been published in the American Economics Review, the Quarterly Journal of Economics, the Journal of Public Economics, the Chicago Law Review, and the American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, among other outlets.

              Selected Publications

              Cellini, Stephanie, Fernando Ferreira, and  Jesse Rothstein. 2010. The Value of School Facility Investments: Evidence from a Dynamic Regression Discontinuity Design. Quarterly Journal of Economics, 125(1): 215-261.

              Rothstein, Jesse and Cecilia Rouse. 2011. Constrained After College: Student Loans and Early Career Occupational Choices. Journal of Public Economics, 95(1-2): 149-163.

              Card, David , Alexandre Mas, and Jesse Rothstein. 2008. Tipping and the Dynamics of Segregation. Quarterly Journal of Economics, 123(1): 177-218. 

              Rothstein, Jesse. 2012. The Labor Market Four Years Into the Crisis: Assessing Structural Explanations. Industrial and Labor Relations Review, 65(3): 467-500.

              Affiliated PhD Student

              Jeffrey Sharlein

              x

              Doctoral Candidate in Social Welfare, School of Social Policy and Practice, University of Pennsylvania

              About

              Jeffrey Sharlein is a PhD student in social welfare in the University of Pennsylvania’s School of Social Policy and Practice (SP2).  Prior to entering the program, he worked directly with urban youth in numerous contexts in New York City and Detroit.  Sharlein holds a BA from Wesleyan University and an MSW from Hunter College, where he was awarded the 2006 Jacob Goldfein Award for Scholarship.  A 2012-2013 recipient of SP2’s Chai Doctoral Fellowship, Sharlein’s dissertation research focuses on understanding how inner-city youth who have engaged in serious offending behavior understand that behavior in relation to the neighborhood context.

              Affiliated PhD Student

              Edward Smith

              x

              Doctoral Candidate, Graduate School of Education, University of Pennsylvania

              About

              Edward J. Smith is a Ph.D. student at Penn GSE. He previously worked as a Senior Policy Analyst in the Research and Policy Institute at NASPA, an association comprised of 13,000 higher education professionals in all 50 states, eight U.S. Territories, and 25 countries. Ed has also worked as a Research Analyst at the Institute for Higher Education Policy in Washington and taught English for three years at the University of the District of Columbia Community College. His research focuses on building and sustaining education attainment efforts in metropolitan areas, with a particular emphasis on better understanding the effects of municipal, institutional, and community practices and policies on educational outcomes. Ed earned his bachelor’s degree in Economics and master’s degree in College Student Affairs from The Pennsylvania State University.

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