People

Penn IUR is affiliated with more than 200 experts in the field of urbanism. Its Faculty Fellows program identifies faculty at the University of Pennsylvania with a demonstrated interest in urban research; the Penn IUR Scholars program identifies urban scholars outside of Penn; and the Penn IUR Fellows program identifies expert urban practitioners. Together, these programs foster a community of scholars and encourage cross-disciplinary collaboration.

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Penn IUR Scholar

Richard Bernknopf

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Research Professor, Department of Economics, University of New Mexico

Areas of Interest

    About

    Richard Bernknopf is Research Professor in the Department of Economics at the University of New Mexico. Previously, Berknopf was an economist with the USGS Western Geographic Science Center; his work with USGS has spanned more than three decades. Bernknopf’s research focuses on the demonstration of the relevance to society of natural science information including earth observation and the translation of that information into a form compatible with decision-making processes. He is currently associated with the Science Impact Laboratory for Policy and Economics at the University of New Mexico and the Wharton Geospatial Initiative at the University of Pennsylvania. His areas of expertise include Natural Science Information and Policy.

    Selected Publications

    Labiosa, William, Paul Hearn, David Strong, Richard Bernknopf, Dianna Hogan, Leonard Pearlstine. 2010. The South Florida Ecosystem Portfolio Model: A Web-Enabled Multicriteria Land Use Planning Decision Support System. Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences (HICSS): 1-10.

    Bernknopf, Richard L., Sharyl J. M. Rabinovici, Nathan J. Wood, Laura B. Dinitz. 2006. The Influence of Hazard Models on GIS-based Regional Risk Assessments and Mitigation Policies. International Journal of Risk Assessment and Management. 6(4/5/6): 369-387.

    Bernknopf, R., T. Smith, A. Wein. 2006. The Effect of Spatially Correlated Failures on Natural Hazard Damage Assessments. American Geophysical Union, Fall Meeting: abstract #GC43A-04.

    Emerging Scholar

    Catherine Brinkley

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    Ph.D., Regional Planning, University of Pennsylvania

    Veterinary (VMD) student, University of Pennsylvania Veterinary School

    MS in Virology, Gothenburg University, Sweden

    Areas of Interest

      About

      Katie Brinkley completed her Ph.D. in Regional Planning at PennDesign in December 2013 and recently finished her last clinical year in the VMD program at the University of Pennsylvania Veterinary School. Brinkley’s Ph.D. in Regional Planning and Master’s degree in Virology, along with her current work as a Veterinary student, inform her research in ecosystem management; this research concentrates particularly on the prevention of animal-to-human disease and sustainable resource planning. Her research interests include public health, the rural-urban interface, animal agriculture, and food security. Brinkley’s dissertation uses GIS and spatial analytics to explore urban development morphologies as they impact the agricultural sector, regional economies and food distribution. She has worked with the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations to assess food access and waste management in low-income nations and is a former Fulbright Fellow.

      Selected Publications

      Brinkley, C. (2012). "Evaluating the Benefits of Peri-Urban Agriculture." Journal of Planning 

      Literature. 27(3): 259-269.

      Brinkley, C. (2013). "Avenues into Food Planning: a Review of Scholarly Food System Research." International Journal of Planning Studies. 18(2): 243-266.

      Brinkley, Catherine, Eugenie Birch, and Alexander Keating. (2013) "Feeding cities: Charting a research and practice agenda toward food security." Journal of Agriculture, Food Systems and Community Development.

      Brinkley, C. forthcoming. "Decoupled: successful planning policies in countries that have reduced per capita GHG emissions with continued economic growth," Environment and Planning C: Government and Policy.

      Emerging Scholar

      Albert T. Han

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      Faculty of Environmental Design, University of Calgary

      About

      Albert Tonghoon Han is currently a postdoctoral research fellow with the University of Calgary’s Faculty of Environmental Design. His research focuses on studying how growth management, land use planning, and environmental policies affect the natural environment in metropolitan areas in the North America and other fast-growing cities around the world. He is also interested in studying how planning efforts based on market-based approaches can mitigate the impacts of climate change, particularly in regards to improving building energy efficiency in cities. Albert received his Ph.D. in City and Regional Planning from University of Pennsylvania in 2015. Prior to Penn, he worked on various global environmental projects at the Korea Environment Institute from 2011 to 2012. He obtained his master's degree in Urban and Regional Planning from the University of Iowa in 2011 with specialization in environmental planning and spatial analysis. His devotion to studying land use and environmental planning originated from his background in Life Science and Biotechnology from Korea University where he received his bachelor's degree in 2009.

      Faculty Fellow

      Amy Hillier

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      Associate Professor

      About

      Amy Hillier is Associate Professor in the Department of City and Regional Planning in the School of Design, with a secondary faculty appointment in the School of Social Policy & Practice. She teaches courses relating to GIS, built environment and public health, and community development in city planning, urban studies, public health, and social work. Her research focuses on issues of geographic disparities and access to services and resources in disadvantaged communities and has included GIS applications in redlining and housing discrimination, affordable housing, and public health. Her dissertation, funded by the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), considered the impact of the Home Owner’s Loan Corporation on lending in Philadelphia. With her focus on public health and the built environment, she frequently collaborates with colleagues at the Perelman School of Medicine and at The Food Trust.

      Selected Publications

      Hillier, Amy and Benjamin Chrisinger. 2017. “The Reality of Urban Food Deserts and What Low-Income Food Shoppers Need.” In Social Policy and Social Justice, edited by John L Jackson, Jr. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.

      Lapham, Sandra C, Deborah A Cohen, Bing Han, Stephanie Williamson, Kelly R Evenson, Thomas L McKenzie, Amy Hillier, and Phillip Ward. 2016. “How important is perception of safety to park use? A four-city survey.” Urban Studies 53(12).

      Cannuscio, CC, A Hillier, A Karpyn, and K Glanz. 2014. “The social dynamics of healthy food shopping and store choice in an urban environment.” Social Science and Medicine 122.

      Mayer, Victoria L, Amy Hillier, Marcus A Bachhuber, Judith A Long. 2014. “Food Insecurity, Neighborhood Food Access, and Food Assistance in Philadelphia.” Journal of Urban Health 91(6).

      Faculty Fellow

      John Landis

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      Crossways Professor of City and Regional Planning

      About

      John Landis is Crossways Professor of City and Regional Planning in the School of Design, the faculty advisor for the MUSA program, as well as the faculty coordinator for both the Real Estate Design and Development Certificate and the GIS Certificate. He served as the Department Chair of City and Regional Planning 2009 to 2017. Prior to arriving at Penn in 2007, he was on the planning faculties of the University of California-Berkeley (1987–2007), Georgia Tech (1985–1986), and the University of Rhode Island (1983–1984). Professor Landis serves on the editorial boards of the Journal of the American Planning Association, the Journal of Planning Education and Research, and Housing Policy Debate. His research interests span a variety of urban development topics; his recent research and publications focus on gentrification and neighborhood change, affordable housing, sprawl and growth management, metropolitan economic resilience, and smart cities technologies. Professor Landis currently serves as Penn’s team leader on the joint University of Texas/University of Pennsylvania Transportation Center on Cooperative Mobility for Competitive Megaregions.

      Selected Publications

      Landis, John, Erick Guerra, and David Hsu. 2017. “Intersecting residential and transportation CO2 emissions: Metropolitan climate change programs in the Age of Trump.” Journal of Planning Education and Research 1-21.

      Landis, John. 2017. “The end of sprawl? Not so fast.” Housing Policy Debate 27(5): 659-697. 

      Landis, John. 2016. “Tracking and explaining neighborhood socioeconomic change in U.S. metropolitan areas between 1990 and 2010.” Housing Policy Debate 26(1): 2-52.

      Faculty Fellow

      Tony Smith

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      Professor of Systems Engineering and Regional Science

      About

      Tony Smith is Professor of Systems Engineering and Regional Science, Department of Electrical and Systems Engineering. His primary area of research is in the theory and application of probabilistic models to spatial interaction behavior. Specific interests focus on structural analysis and axiomatic foundations of such models. Related areas of interest are in probabilistic theories of choice behavior, spatial statistical analysis and GIS. A secondary area of research is in transportation and land use modeling.

      Selected Publications

      Hillier, Amy, Tony Smith, Eliza D. Whiteman, and Benjamin W. Chrisinger. 2017. “Discrete Choice Model of Food Store Trips Using National Household Food Acquisition and Purchase Survey (FoodAPS).” International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 14(10).

      Buzarda, Kristy, Gerald A. Carlino, Robert M. Hunt, Jake K. Carr, and Tony E. Smith. 2017. “The Agglomeration of American R&D Labs.” Journal of Urban Economics 101: 14-26.

      Dearmon, Jacob and Tony Smith. 2017. “Local Marginal Analysis of Spatial Data: A Gaussian Process Regression Approach with Bayesian Model and Kernel Averaging.” Spatial Econometrics 37: 297-342.

      Dearmon, Jacob and Tony Smith. 2016. “Gaussian Process Regression and Bayesian Model Averaging: An alternative approach to modeling spatial phenomena.” Geographical Analysis 48: 82-111.

      Grandner, Michael A., Tony E. Smith, Nicholas Jackson, Tara Jackson, Sarah Burgard, and Charles Branas. 2015. “Geographic Distribution of Insufficient Sleep across the US: A County-Level Hotspot Analysis.” Sleep Health 1(3): 158-165.

      Emerging Scholar

      Kenneth Steif

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      Lecturer, Masters of Urban Spatial Analytics (MUSA), University of Pennslyvania

      About

      Ken Steif has focused on the use of data and analytics in the public policy realm for more than a dozen years.  He combines technical knowledge of Geographic Information Systems and econometric analysis with an interest in housing policy, education, the economics of neighborhood change, transportation policy and more.  Ken teaches the keystone course for Penn’s Smart Cities program in the City Planning department, a course that is cross-listed with the Masters of Urban Spatial Analytics program.  This class teaches new and emerging technologies at the forefront of data science and evidenced-based public policy.  His work has focused on the costs and benefits of gentrification; on the Philadelphia school crisis and the connection between good schools and healthy neighborhoods; and recently on the use of predictive analytics to forecast bike share demand in cities like Philadelphia.  

      Selected Publications

      Can Improvement Districts help save Chicago’s Schools?
      Why all affordable housing isn’t created equal
      Why do certain retail stores cluster together?
      Visualizing Philadelphia's Neighborhood Change Process

      Faculty Fellow

      Frederick Steiner

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      Dean and Paley Professor, School of Design

      School/Department

      Areas of Interest

        About

        Frederick Steiner is Dean and Paley Professor at the University of Pennsylvania School of Design. Previously, he served for 15 years as Dean of the School of Architecture and Henry M. Rockwell Chair in Architecture at The University of Texas at Austin. He has also taught at Arizona State University, Washington State University, the University of Colorado at Denver, and Tsinghua University. Dean Steiner was a Fulbright-Hays scholar at Wageningen University and a Rome Prize Fellow in Historic Preservation at the American Academy in Rome, where was 2013-2014William A. Bernoudy Architect in Residence. He is a Fellow of both the American Society of Landscape Architects and the Council of Educators in Landscape Architecture. Dean Steiner earned a Master of Community Planning and a B.S. in Design from the University of Cincinnati, and his Ph.D. and M.A. in city and regional planning and a Master of Regional Planning from PennDesign.

        Selected Publications

        Palazzo, Danilo  and Frederick Steiner. 2011. Urban Ecological Design. Washington, DC: Island Press.

        Steiner, Frederick. 2011. Design for a Vulnerable Planet. Austin: University of Texas Press.

        Steiner, Frederick. 2008. The Living Landscape, Second Edition: An Ecological Approach to Landscape Planning. Washington, DC: Island Press.

        Steiner, Frederick and Kent Butler. 2006. Planning and Urban Design Standards. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons. 

        Faculty Fellow

        C. Dana Tomlin

        x

        Professor of Landscape Architecture

        About

        C. Dana Tomlin is Professor of Landscape Architecture in the School of Design and Professor Adjunct at the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies. He joined the faculty in 1991 after having taught at the Harvard Graduate School of Design and the Ohio State University School of Natural Resources. A recipient of the Perkins and Lindback Awards for Distinguished Teaching, Tomlin’s work focuses on the development and application of geographic information systems (GIS). He is a founder of Penn’s Cartographic Modeling Laboratory, originator of Map Algebra, author of its definitive text, and a member of the GIS Hall of Fame.

        Selected Publications

        Tomlin, C.D. 2017. "Map Algebra." In The International Encyclopedia of Geography. Wiley.

        Tomlin, C.D. 2016. The Worm’s Eye View from a Bird’s Eye Perspective. In Griffith, Chun, and Dean, Eds. Advances in GeoComputation. Springer.

        Tomlin, C.D. 2013. GIS and Cartographic Modeling. Esri Press.

        Tomlin, C.D. 2011. "Mapping What Isn't Quite There." Perspecta 44 (44): 145-152. 

        Tomlin, C.D. 2010. "Modeling Radial Propagation in a Grid." International Journal of Geographic Information Science 24(9).

        Penn IUR Scholar

        Douglas Webster

        x

        Professor, School of Geographical Sciences and Urban Planning, School of Sustainability, and School of Politics and Global Studies

        Senior Sustainability Scientist, Global Institute of Sustainability, Arizona State University

        About

        Douglas Webster is Professor in the Schools of Geographical Sciences and Urban Planning, of Sustainability, and of Politics and Global Studies, and Senior Sustainability Scientist in the Global Institute of Sustainability at Arizona State University. His current interests are in are comparative urban dynamics, peri-urbanization, and urban management in East Asia. In addition to his academic work, he advises the World Bank on East Asian urbanization and on the private-sector developer's perspective. He works with the Shui On Corporation to develop innovative and city-transforming projects across China, frequently incorporating heritage resources and designs that fuse a myriad of global influences. Webster is a frequent advisor to East Asian Governments on urbanization; he acted as a senior advisor to the Thai Government on urban policies for over a decade. He strives to develop graduates who will be adept global workers who understand the important role that international agencies, voluntary organizations, and multi-national corporations play in shaping local economies and communities worldwide.

        Selected Publications

        Webster, Douglas. 2011. An Overdue Agenda: Systematizing East Asian Peri-Urban Research. Pacific Affairs, 84(4): 631-642.

        Webster, Douglas, Larissa Muller, and Jianming Cai. 2011. The Emerging Cultural Economy in Chinese Cities: Early Dynamics. International Development Planning Review, 33(3): 343-369.

        Webster, Douglas and Chuthatip Maneepong. 2011. Bangkok: New Risks, Old Resilience. In Planning Asian Cities: Risk and Resilience, S. Hamnett and D. Forbes, eds., 264-286. London and New York: Routledge.

        Webster, Douglas. 2011. City Building in China: Implications for Urban Form Efficiency. In Global Urbanization in the 21st Century, Eugénie Birch and Susan Wachter, eds. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press. 

        Faculty Fellow

        Douglas Wiebe

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        Associate Professor of Epidemiology

        About

        Douglas Wiebe is Associate Professor of Epidemiology in the Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology in the Perelman School of Medicine. His research interests include environmental risk factors for injury, the methodologic challenges of activity pattern measurement and exposure measurement, and the impact of daily routines on health-related behavior. A number of his studies examine how keeping a firearm at home relates to homicide, suicide, and unintentional shootings of household members. He also studies issues of the clinical management of trauma and mild traumatic brain injury. One study he leads, funded by the Penn Comprehensive Neuroscience Center, aims to understand the timeline to recovery for children who have sustained a concussion.

        Selected Publications

        Flynn KE, TS Richmond, CC Branas, and DJ Wiebe. 2017. “Neighborhood social trust and youth perceptions of safety during daily activities.” Injury Prevention.

        Kondo, M, CC Branas, TS Richmond, G South, and DJ Wiebe. 2017. “The association between urban tree cover and gun assault: a case-control and case-crossover study.” American Journal of Epidemiology 186(3): 289-296. 

        Morrison, Christopher N, Sara F Jacoby, Beidi Dong, M. Kit Delgado, Douglas J Wiebe. 2017. “Ridesharing and Motor Vehicle Crashes in 4 US Cities: An Interrupted Time-Series Analysis.” American Journal of Epidemiology.

        Beidi Dong, Charles C. Branas, Therese S. Richmond, Christopher N. Morrison, and Douglas J. Wiebe. 2017. “Youth's daily activities and situational triggers of gunshot assault.” Journal of Adolescent Health.

        Penn IUR Scholar

        Anthony Yeh

        x

        Chair, Professor, and Head of the Department of Urban Planning and Design, Director of the Geographic Information Systems Research Centre, Deputy Convener of the Contemporary China Studies Strategic Research Area, The University of Hong Kong

        About

        Anthony Yeh is Chair, Professor, and Head of the Department of Urban Planning and Design, Director of the Geographic Information Systems Research Centre, and Deputy Convener of the Contemporary China Studies Strategic Research Area at the University of Hong Kong. He was elected as an Academician of the Chinese Academy of Sciences in 2003 and Fellow of The Academy of Sciences for the Developing World in 2010. He has been the Secretary-General of the Asian Planning Schools Association (APSA) since 1993.  Yeh’s fields of interest include land use planning, urban renewal, new towns, geographic information systems, and urban planning and development in Hong Kong, China, and South East Asia. He has done fieldwork in Thailand, Malaysia, Japan, Taiwan, and the Philippines as well as in Hong Kong and China.

        Selected Publications

        Yeh, Anthony and Fiona F. Yang, eds. 2013. Producer Services in China: Economic and Urban Development. London: Routledge.

        Yang, Fiona F. and Anthony Yeh. 2013. Spatial Development of Producer Services in the Chinese Urban System. Environment and Planning A, 45(1): 159-179.

        Yeh, Anthony. 2011. Hong Kong: The Turning of the Dragon Head. In Planning Asian Cities – Risks and Resilience, 180-200, Stephen Hamnett and Dean Forbes, eds. London: Routledge.

        Hong Yi, Fiona F. Yang, and Anthony Yeh. 2011. Intraurban Location of Producer Services in Guangzhou, China. Environment and Planning A, 43(1): 28-47.

        Yeh, Anthony and Jiang Xu, eds. 2011. China’s Pan-Pearl River Delta: Regional Cooperation and Development. Hong Kong: Hong Kong University Press.

        Yuen , Belinda and Anthony Yeh, eds. 2011. High-Rise Living in Asian Cities. Dordrecht: Springer.

        Xu, Jiang and Anthony Yeh, eds. 2011. Governance and Planning of Mega-City Regions: An International Comparative Perspective. London: Routledge

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