People

Penn IUR is affiliated with more than 200 experts in the field of urbanism. Its Faculty Fellows program identifies faculty at the University of Pennsylvania with a demonstrated interest in urban research; the Penn IUR Scholars program identifies urban scholars outside of Penn; and the Penn IUR Fellows program identifies expert urban practitioners. Together, these programs foster a community of scholars and encourage cross-disciplinary collaboration.

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Emerging Scholar

Arthur Acolin

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Assistant Professor, Department of Real Estate, University of Washington

Areas of Interest

    About

    Arthur Acolin is an Assistant Professor of Real Estate at the University of Washington with a broad interest in housing economics and a focus on international housing policy and finance. He completed his PhD in Urban Planning and Development at the University of Southern California in 2017. Recent research projects include a study of the presence of discrimination against different immigrant groups in the rental market in France with Raphael Bostic and Gary Painter, an examination of the effect of non-traditional mortgages on homeownership in the US with Xudong An, Raphael Bostic and Susan Wachter and the development of housing affordability indicators incorporating location for the metropolitan region of Sao Paulo, Brazil with Richard Green. Prior to doing his Ph.D., Acolin was a Research Associate at the Penn Institute for Urban Research working on housing, urbanization and economic development issues. He obtained a master in Urban Policy from the London School of Economics and Sciences Po Paris and an undergraduate degree in Urban Studies from the University of Pennsylvania.

    Selected Publications

    Acolin, Arthur, and Domenic Vitiello. "Who owns Chinatown: Neighbourhood preservation and change in Boston and Philadelphia." Urban Studies (2017): 0042098017699366.

    Acolin, Arthur, Xudong An, Raphael W. Bostic, and Susan M. Wachter. "Homeownership and Nontraditional and Subprime Mortgages." Housing Policy Debate 27.3 (2017): 393-418.

    Acolin, Arthur, Raphael Bostic, and Gary Painter. "A field study of rental market discrimination across origins in France." Journal of Urban Economics 95 (2016): 49-63.

    Acolin, Arthur, Jesse Bricker, Paul Calem, and Susan Wachter. "Borrowing constraints and homeownership." The American Economic Review 106.5 (2016): 625-629.

    Acolin, Arthur, and Richard K. Green. "Measuring housing affordability in São Paulo metropolitan region: Incorporating location." Cities 62 (2017): 41-49.

    Faculty Fellow

    Stefan Al

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    Associate Professor of Urban Design

    About

    Stefan Al is an architect, urban designer, urban planner, scholar, educator, and author, currently serving as Associate Professor of Urban Design at the University of Pennsylvania. In his research, Professor Al aims to understand pressing issues in architecture and urban design, such as urbanization in developing countries, new forms of consumerism, compact city form, and adapting cities to climate change.

    His recent sole-authored book The Strip: Las Vegas and the Architecture of the American Dream (The MIT Press) investigates the city’s experiments with architecture and branding. He is acclaimed for his work on Asian urbanism with published books investigating China’s informal settlements and Hong Kong’s compact urban form, including Factory Towns of South ChinaVillages in the City, Mall City, and Macau and the Casino Complex. He co-authored the book Beyond Mobility, making the case to connect people with places through transit-oriented development. His latest research is focused on designing compact and more resilient cities, most notably in his forthcoming book Adapting Cities to Sea Level Rise. Besides his academic publications, his work has been featured in influential media outlets including The Guardian, The Wall Street Journal, NPR, Marketplace, and Dezeen

    Al’s career as a practicing architect includes work on renowned projects such as the 2,000-feet high Canton Tower in Guangzhou, the preservation of world heritage in Latin America at the World Heritage Center of UNESCO, and an 11,000-acre new eco-friendly city in India. He has also served as an advisor to the Hong Kong government, consulting on the development of the city’s harbor and external lighting guidelines, the Chinese government, advising on new urban design guidelines, and the United Nations High-Level Political Forum on Sustainable Development. 

    Selected Publications

    Al, Stefan. 2017. The Strip: Las Vegas and the Architecture of the American Dream. The MIT Press.

    Al, Stefan, ed. 2016. Mall City: Hong Kong’s Dreamworlds of Consumption. University of Hawaii Press.

    Al, Stefan, ed. 2014. Villages in the City: A Guide to South China’s Informal Settlements. University of Hawaii Press; Hong Kong University Press.

    Al, Stefan, ed. 2012. Factory Towns of South China: An Illustrated Guidebook. Hong Kong University Press.

    Sydney Baloue

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    PhD Candidate, Africana Studies, School of Arts & Sciences, University of Pennyslvania

    About

    Sydney Baloue is a William Fontaine Fellow of Africana Studies at the University of Pennsylvania. His research explores Black dance and music subcultures and Black queer geographies within urban landscapes. He has a particular focus on the usage of oral histories to document genealogies of Black and Latinx LGBT communities in New York City and in Europe, which constitute ball/house culture and voguing. His research methods include oral histories, performance ethnography, data analysis and international/regional comparative research. Prior to entering graduate school at Penn, Sydney was awarded a German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD) Study Scholarship in 2011. He was a Transatlantic Fellow at Ecologic Institute in Berlin from 2012 to 2014. Sydney holds a dual-degree MSc/MA in Urban Policy from the London School of Economics and the Paris Institute of Political Studies (Sciences Po). He graduated magna cum laude with a BA in Political Science and French & Francophone Studies from the University of Pennsylvania in 2011.

    Selected Publications

    Sydney Baloue, (2016) Black and Latin@ Queer Geographies and Oral Histories of Ballroom Culture in New York City. (London, UK: Masters Thesis, London School of Economics and Politics, 2016).

    Haut Conseil d’Egalité Entre Femmes et Hommes – Premier Ministre, (2015) Avis sur le harcèlement sexiste et les violences sexuelles dans les transports en commun. – Report for French Prime Minister’s Office No. 2015-04-16-VIO-16 (Paris, France: Haut Conseil d’Egalité Entre Femmes et Hommes, 2015)

    Sydney Baloue and Cecile Moore, Think Tanks in a Time of Crisis and Paralysis: On the Sidelines or Catalysts for Ideas and Actions? (Philadelphia, PA: Think Tanks and Civil Societies Program, 2013).

    Ecologic Institute, E.On, Policy Studies Institute (2013): Consumer preferences for smart homes: a comparative study between the United Kingdom, Germany and Italy. – Report for E.On under E.On International Research Initiative 2012.

    Faculty Fellow

    David Barnes

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    Director of Health and Societies Major and Associate Professor

    About

    David Barnes is Associate Professor and Director of the Health and Societies Major in the Department of History and Sociology of Science in the School of Arts and Sciences, where he teaches the history of medicine and public health. Prior to joining Penn, Barnes taught for a year at the Institute for Liberal arts at Emory University and for seven years in the History of Science Department at Harvard University. His current research is concentrated in the history of infectious disease, epidemiology, and public health; nineteenth-century urban European social and cultural history; and the politics of international disease control programs. He has a forthcoming book on the history of the Lazaretto Quarantine Station, located outside of Philadelphia.

    Selected Publications

    Barnes, David. 2014. “Cargo, ‘Infection,’ Cargo, and the Logic of Quarantine in the Nineteenth Century.” Bulletin of the History of Medicine 88(1).

    Barnes, David. 2010. “Targeting Patient Zero." In Tuberculosis Then and Now: Perspectives on the History of an Infectious Disease, 49-71, edited by Flurin Condrau and Michael Worboys.  Montreal, QC and Kingston, ON: McGill-Queen's University Press.

    Barnes, David. 2006. The Great Stink of Paris and the Nineteenth-Century Struggle against Filth and Germs. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press.

    Barnes, David. 2002. “Scents and Sensibilities: Disgust and the Meanings of Odors in Late Nineteenth-Century Paris." Historical Reflections/Réflexions historiques 28: 21-49.

    Barnes, David. 1 995. The Making of a Social Disease: Tuberculosis in Nineteenth-Century France. University of California Press.

    Faculty Fellow

    Jonathan Barnett

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    Professor Emeritus of Practice in City and Regional Planning

    About

    Jonathan Barnett is Professor Emeritus of Practice in City and Regional Planning and former Director of the Urban Design Program in the School of Design. He is an architect and planner as well as an educator and is the author of numerous books and articles on the theory and practice of city design. He has been an advisor to the cities of Charleston, SC, Cleveland, Kansas City, Miami, Nashville, New York City, Norfolk, Omaha, and Pittsburgh in the United States, as well as Xiamen and Tianjin in China. He has been the William Henry Bishop visiting professor at Yale, the Eschweiler Professor at the University of Wisconsin, the Kea Distinguished Visiting Professor at the University of Maryland, and the Sam Gibbons Eminent Scholar at the University of South Florida, and is a guest professor at Southeast University in Nanjing. With his co-author, Larry Beasley, he teaches an on-line course, Ecodesign for Cities and Suburbs, which is available on edX. Barnett was awarded the Dale Prize for Excellence in Urban Design and Regional Planning, the Athena Medal from the Congress for the New Urbanism, and the William H. Whyte Award from the Partners for Livable Communities for being a pioneer in urban design education and practice.

    Selected Publications

    Barnett, Jonathan and Brian W. Blaesser. 2017. Reinventing Development Regulation. Cambridge MA: Lincoln Institute of Land Policy.

    Barnett, Jonathan. 2016. City Design: Modernist, Traditional, Green, and Systems Perspectives, 2nd Edition.  New York, NY: Routledge.

    Barnett, Jonathan and Larry Beasley. 2015. Ecodesign for Cities and Suburbs. Washington: Island Press. 

    Barnett, Jonathan, editor. 2007. Smart Growth in a Changing World. Chicago, Ill. : Planners Press, American Planning Association.

    Barnett, Jonathan. 2012. “Jane Jacobs and Designing Cities as Organized Complexity.” In The Urban Wisdom of Jane Jacobs, edited by Sonia Hirt and Diane Zamora. New York, NY: Routledge.

    Faculty Fellow

    Eugénie L. Birch

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    Lawrence C. Nussdorf Professor of Urban Research and Education

    Chair of the Graduate Group in City and Regional Planning

    Co-Director, Penn Institute for Urban Research

    About

    Eugénie L. Birch FAICP, RTPI (hon), is the Nussdorf Professor of Urban Research, Department of City and Regional Planning, School of Design, University of Pennsylvania. She is the founding co-director of the Penn Institute for Urban Research, and co-editor of Penn Press’s The City in the 21st Century series. Dr.Birch’s most recent publications include Slums: How Informal Real Estate Markets Work (2016), co-edited with Susan Wachter and Shohana Chattaraj, Global Urbanization  (2011), co-edited with Susan Wachter, Women’s Health and the World’s Cities  (2011), co-edited with Afaf Meleis and Susan Wachter, and Neighborhoods and Life Chances, How Place Matters (2011) co-edited with Susan Wachter and Harriet Newberger). Dr. Birch has served as editor, Journal of the American Planning Association, chair, Planning Accreditation Board, president, Association of Collegiate Schools of Planning (ACSP), Society for American City and Regional Planning History (SACRPH) and the International Planning History Society (IPHS).  Her awards include: Lawrence C. Gerkens Award in Planning History (SACRPH), Jay Chatterjee Award, Margarita McCoy Award and Distinguished Educator Award (ACSP). Dr. Birch has served as a member of the New York City Planning Commission and of the jury to select the designers for the World Trade Center site. She is currently chair, UN-HABITAT’s World Urban Campaign and president of its special initiative, the General Assembly of Partners toward Habitat III. Dr. Birch, who lives in New York City, holds a PhD and Master in Urban Planning from Columbia University and an A.B. cum laude in History and Latin American Affairs from Bryn Mawr College. 

    Selected Publications

    Books

    Slums, How Informal Real Estate Markets Work  Philadelphia, University of Pennsylvania Press (2016) (edited with Susan Wachter, Shahana Chattaraj).

    Chapters

    “The Institutions of Metropolitan Governance,” in David Gomez Alvarz, Eduardo Moreno and R. Rajack (eds), Steering the Metropolis, Metropolitan Governance for Sustainable Urban Development (Nairobi: UN Habitat, forthcoming).

    “Modeling Interdiciplinarity: Spaces of Modern Paris through Literature and Design,” in Robert T. Talley (ed). Teaching Space, Place and Mapping, Routledge (forthcoming) (with Andrea Goulet).

    “The Imprint of History in the Practice of City and Regional Planning” in C. Hein (ed), Planning History Handbook (New York: Routledge, forthcoming).

    “Metrics and the Impact of the Urban SDG,” in David Simon, et al. (eds), The Urban Planet: Patterns and Pathways to the Cities We Want (forthcoming) with Andrew Rudd, Maruxa Cardama, Aromar Revi.

    Journals

    “Inclusion and Innovation: The Many Forms of Stakeholder Engagement in Habitat III”Citiscape (forthcoming).

    “Implementing the New Urban Agenda in the United States: Building on a Firm Foundation,“ Informationen zur Raumentwicklung (Information on Spatial Development) (forthcoming).

    “Midterm Report: Will Habitat III Make a Difference to Global Urban Development?” Journal of the American Planning Association 84:4 (Fall 2016): 398-411.

    Fellow

    Monica Brezzi

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    Head of the Regional Analysis and Statistics Unit, OECD Directorate for Public Governance and Territorial Development

    Areas of Interest

      About

      Monica Brezzi is Head of the Regional Analysis and Statistics Unit in the OECD Directorate for Public Governance and Territorial Development. Her current activities focus on the analysis of regional comparative advantages and the assessment of policies to reduce inequalities in the access to key services for citizens. She has recently contributed to design a web mapping tool to help decision makers and citizens develop a better knowledge of their society using statistical information. Before joining OECD, she worked for the Ministry of Economic Development in Italy where she contributed to design and launch a performance-based policy to measure the efficiency of local public services. 
      Affiliated PhD Student

      Veronica Brownstone

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      Phd Candidate, Hispanic Studies, School of Arts & Sciences, University of Pennsylvania

      About

      Veronica Brownstone is a fourth year doctoral student in Hispanic Studies at the University of Pennsylvania. Her dissertation explores how contemporary Central American cultural production deals with the current crisis of disposable labor power. Drawing on the intersections of political economy, critical race theory, and class politics, her research asks what literature and film tell us about the political textures of today’s surplus populations. Of particular interest to her work are the dynamics of the informal, service, and migrant sectors as they relate to subject formation and collectivity. Veronica holds a BA with Honors in Latin American and Caribbean Studies from McGill University. 

      Penn IUR Scholar

      Robert Buckley

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      Julien Studley Fellow, Milano School of International Affairs, The New School

      About

      Bob is the Julien Studley Fellow in the Graduate Program in International Affairs at The New School.  Previously, he was Managing Director at the Rockefeller Foundation, and Advisor at the World Bank.  His work has focused on urbanization in developing countries.  A significant part involved preparing projects and grants related to urban development issues.  He has worked in more than 55 countries and has written widely on urbanization, housing, and development issues in the popular press, such as the Financial Times, the New York Times, and the Washington Post, as well as in academic journals such as the Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Nature, the Journal of Money,Credit and Banking, and Economic Development and Cultural Change.  His most recent book, Urbanization and Economic Growth, was co-edited with Michael Spence and Patricia Annez. Buckley has also taught at Syracuse University, Johns Hopkins University, and the University of Pennsylvania—and served as the chief economist of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development.  Finally, he has been a Fulbright Scholar, awarded a Regent's Fellowship at the University of California, and been supported by the Marshall Fund, the Gates Foundation, the National Science Foundation, and the International Growth Centre of Oxford University.

      Selected Publications

      Selected Publications

      Buckley, Robert and Achilles Kallergis. 2014. Does African Urban Policy Provide a Platform for Sustained Economic Growth? In The Handbook on Cities in the Global South, S. Parnell and S. Oldfield, (eds.) New York: Routledge.

      Buckley, Robert, Patricia Annez and Michael Spence. 2009. Urbanization and Economic Growth. The World Bank on behalf of the Commission on Growth and Development, Washington D.C.

      Buckley, Robert, Glumira Karaguishiyeva, Robert Van Order, and Laura Vecvagare. March 2006. Mortgage Credit Risk in EU Countries: Constraints on Exploiting the Single Currency Market, The European Journal of Law and Economics.  

      Buckely, Robert and Jerry Kalarickal. Sept. 2005. Housing Policy in Developing Countries: Conjectures and Refutations, World Bank Research Observer.

       

      Faculty Fellow

      William Burke-White

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      Richard Perry Professor, Professor of Law; Inaugural Director, Perry World House

      School/Department

      Areas of Interest

        About

        William Burke-White is Richard Perry Professor and Professor of Law at Penn Law and Inaugural Director of Perry World House. An expert on international law and global governance, Burke-White served in the Obama Administration from 2009-2011 on Secretary Clinton’s Policy Planning Staff, providing the Secretary direct policy advice on multilateral diplomacy and international institutions. He was principal drafter of the Quadrennial Diplomacy and Development Review (QDDR), Secretary Clinton’s hallmark foreign policy and institutional reform effort. Burke-White has written extensively in the fields of international law and institutions, with a focus on international criminal and international economic law. His work has addressed issues of post-conflict justice; the International Criminal Court; international human rights, and international arbitration. His current research explores gaps in the global governance system and the challenges of international legal regulation in a world of rising powers and divergent interests. In 2008 he received the A. Leo Levin Award and in 2007 the Robert A. Gorman award for Excellence in Teaching.

        Selected Publications

        Burke-White, William. 2015. “Power Shifts in International Law: Structural Realignment and Substantive Pluralism.” Harvard International Law Journal 56(1): 1-79.
        Burke-White, William. 2014. “Crimea and the International Legal Order,” 56 Survival 65 (2014).
        Burke-White, William. 2011. “The Adoption of the Responsibility to Protect.” In The Responsibility to Protect the Promise of Stopping Mass Atrocities in our Time. edited by Jared Genser and Irwin Cotler. Oxford.
        Burke-White, William and Andreas von Staden. 2010. “Private Litigation in a Public Law Sphere: The Standard of Review in Investor State Arbitration.” 35 Yale International Law Journal 283.
        Burke-White, William. 2010. “Reframing Positive Complementarity: Reflections on the First Decade and Insights from the US Federal Criminal Justice System.” In The International Criminal Court and Complementarity: From Theory to Practice. Cambridge University Press.

        Emerging Scholar

        Caroline Cheong

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        Assistant Professor, Department of History, University of Central Florida

        About

        Caroline Cheong is an assistant professor in the History Department at the University of Central Florida. Her research focuses on the relationship between urban heritage conservation and economic development, values-based conservation management, conservation economics and poverty reduction. She earned her PhD from the University of Pennsylvania in City and Regional Planning, her MS in Historic Preservation from the University of Pennsylvania and her BS in Anthropology from the University of Chicago. She was a US/ICOMOS International Exchange Intern in Al Houson, Jordan and a Graduate Intern at the Getty Conservation Institute where she evaluated the challenges and opportunities facing historic cities.  Previously, Caroline was the Director of Research for Heritage Strategies International and PlaceEconomics through which she published numerous research reports and professional publications focusing on the economic impacts of historic preservation with Donovan Rypkema.

        Selected Publications

        Macdonald, Susan and Caroline Cheong. The Role of Public-Private Partnerships in Conserving Heritage Buildings, Sites and Historic Urban Areas: A Literature Review. Los Angeles, CA: Getty Publications, 2014

        Cheong, Caroline. Instruments for urban regeneration: Mixed-capital companies. (2014). Manuscript submitted for publication. Prepared for Eduardo Rojas.

        Cheong, Caroline. Creative Cities and Place. (2013). Manuscript submitted for publication. Prepared for Donovan Rypkema, Erasmus University and the Ministry of Education, Culture and Science of the Netherlands.

        Cheong, Caroline. Cruise Ship Tourism: Issues and Trends. Prepared for the World Monuments Fund for “Harboring Tourism: A Symposium on Cruise Ships in Historic Port Communities,” 2012.

        Fellow

        Joan Clos

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        Executive Director, United Nations Human Settlement Programme (UN-Habitat)

        Areas of Interest

          About

          Joan Clos is Executive Director of the United Nations Human Settlement Programme (UN-Habitat) at the level of Undersecretary-General by the United Nations General Assembly since October 2010. Clos is a medical doctor with a distinguished career in public service and diplomacy. He was twice elected Mayor of Barcelona, serving two terms during the years 1997-2006. He was Minister of Industry, Tourism and Trade of Spain between 2006 and 2008. Prior to joining the United Nations, he served as Spanish ambassador to Turkey and Azerbaijan. He has also been a member of the Council of European Municipalities and Regions (CEMR), Chairman of the UN Advisory Committee of Local Authorities (UNACLA), President for the World Association of Cities and Local Authorities, and President of Metropolis. He has received a number of awards, which include a gold medal from the Royal Institute of British Architects in 1999 for transforming Barcelona and, in 2002 the UN-Habitat Scroll of Honour Award for encouraging global cooperation between local authorities and the United Nations. 

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