People

Penn IUR is affiliated with more than 200 experts in the field of urbanism. Its Faculty Fellows program identifies faculty at the University of Pennsylvania with a demonstrated interest in urban research; the Penn IUR Scholars program identifies urban scholars outside of Penn; and the Penn IUR Fellows program identifies expert urban practitioners. Together, these programs foster a community of scholars and encourage cross-disciplinary collaboration.

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Affiliated PhD Student

Xiaoxia Dong

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PhD Candidate, City and Regional Planning, University of Pennslyvania

About

Xiaoxia Dong is a doctoral student in the Department of City and Regional Planning at PennDesign. His research interest lies in transportation and infrastructure planning. In particular, he is eager to explore how the potential of new transportation technologies and services such as driverless cars and ride-hailing can be maximized to create accessible and sustainable urban environment. Having witnessed the success and failure of many of these emerging technologies and services in China, he also hopes to incorporate an international perspective into his research. His goal is to enable policy makers to make informed decisions when facilitating urban development with respect to new transportation technologies and services. Xiaoxia has a BA degree in Urban Planning from the University of Utah and a Master of City Planning degree from the University of Pennsylvania. He worked as a transportation planner at Fehr and Peers where he participated in multimodal planning, traffic impact studies, master planning, and statistical analyses. He also interned at the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) in Beijing after college where he learned the current sustainability related policies and practices in China.

Selected Publications

Dong, Xiaoxia. 2014 “A High Speed Future.” Panorama. University of Pennsylvania, School of Design.

Dong, Xiaoxia. 2011 “Wisdom of the Businessmen of Chicago” (In Chinese). Peking University Business Review. Peking University.

Faculty Fellow

Gilles Duranton

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Dean's Chair in Real Estate Professor; Department Chair

About

Gilles Duranton is Professor of Real Estate in the Real Estate Department at The Wharton School. His research focuses on urban and regional development, transportation, and local public finance. Prior to joining the Real Estate Department in 2012, Duranton taught at the University of Toronto for seven years, and the London School of Economics for nine years. He is the co-editor of the Journal of Urban Economics, and is an editorial board member for several other journals. He is also affiliated with the Centre for Economic Policy Research in London, the Spatial Economics Research Centre at the London School of Economics, and the Rimini Centre for Economic Analysis. He currently serves as the Chair of the Real Estate department at The Wharton School.

Selected Publications

Duranton, Gilles. 2016. “Determinants of city growth in Colombia.” Papers in Regional Science 95(1): 101-132.

Duranton, Gilles. 2016. “Agglomeration effects in Colombia.” Journal of Regional Science 56(2): 210-238.

Duranton, Gilles. 2015. “Roads and Trade in Colombia.” Economics of Transportation 4(1): 16-36.

Duranton, Gilles. 2015. “Growing through cities in developing countries.” World Bank Research Observer 30(1): 39-73.

Faculty Fellow

Fernando Ferreira

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Associate Professor, Departments of Real Estate, and Business Economics and Public Policy

About

Fernando Ferreira is Associate Professor of Real Estate and Business Economics and Public Policy. His interests include public economics, urban economics, and real estate. He is also a Faculty Fellow and Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER), for which he co-edits the Journal of Public Economics. Ferreira has served as a visiting scholar at the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia and the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, and is the recipient of various research grants, including from the Ford Foundation and the U.S. Department of Education. 

Selected Publications

Ferreira, Fernando “What Drives Racial and Ethnic Differences in High Cost Mortgages? The Role of High Risk Lenders”, with Patrick Bayer and Stephen Ross. Forthcoming. Review of Financial Studies.

Ferreira, Fernando, Patrick Bayer, and Stephen Ross. 2016. “The Vulnerability of Minority Homeowners in the Housing Boom and Bust.” American Economic Journal: Economic Policy 8(1).

Ferreira, Fernando and Joseph Gyourko. 2014. “Does Gender Matter for Political Leadership? The Case of U.S. Mayors.” Journal of Public Economics 112: 24-39.

Ferreira, Fernando, Leah Platt Boustan, Hernan Winkler, and Eric Zolt. 2013. “The Effect of Rising Income Inequality on Taxation and Public Expenditures: Evidence from U.S. Municipalities and School Districts, 1970-2000.” Review of Economics and Statistics 95(4): 1291-1302.

Penn IUR Scholar

Billy Fleming

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Post-Doctoral Fellow, Ian L. McHarg Center, University of Pennsylvania

About

Billy is a post-doctoral fellow at the Ian L. McHarg Center with a background in urban design and policy development. He graduated with a PhD in City and Regional Planning from the University of Pennsylvania and Bachelor of Landscape Architecture from the University of Arkansas where also served as the Student Government President during his final year – the first design student to do so in the University’s 140-year history. Upon graduation, he was presented with the Senior Citation Award, which honors the top undergraduate man and woman across the entire campus. Billy then practiced as a landscape architect in the Middle East, specializing in the development of afforestation strategies in water-scarce environments before returning to graduate school at the University of Texas. While there, he served as a research assistant to Dean Fritz Steiner and was presented with the award for the top master’s thesis within the UT School of Architecture. After graduation, Billy worked in the White House Domestic Policy Council during the first term of President Obama’s Administration and his portfolio included the Sustainable Communities Initiative and the America’s Great Outdoors Initiative (National Parks Service). His dissertation work is focused on the nature of climate change adaptation in coastal cities and it is informed greatly by his work and academic experience.

Selected Publications

B. Fleming. 2015. Towards a Megaregional Future: Analysing Progress, Assessing Priorities in the US Megaregion Project. In J. Harrison and M. Hoyler (Eds.), Megaregions: Globalization's New Urban Form?, (pp. 200-229). London: Edward Elgar Publishing.

B. Fleming. 2015. "Can We Rebuild by Design?"LA+, 1(1): 104-111.

B. Fleming. 2015. "Book Review: Crisis Cities: Disaster and Redevelopment in New York and New Orleans." Journal of the American Planning Association, 84(2): 158-159.

B. Fleming. 2015 (in-press). "Double-Book Review: The Resilience Dividend: Being Strong in a World Where Things Go Wrong & The Social Roots of Risk: Producing Disasters, Promoting Resilience." Journal of the American Planning Association, 84(4).

B. Fleming 2016 (in-press). "Lost in Translation: The Authorship Structure and Argumentation of Resilience." Landscape Journal, 35(1).

Penn IUR Scholar

Matthew Freedman

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Associate Professor of Economics, Drexel University

Areas of Interest

    About

    Matthew Freedman is an Associate Professor of Economics at Drexel University. His research interests lie at the intersection of labor economics, public finance, and urban economics. His current work examines how federal, state, and local housing and economic development programs affect neighborhoods. His research also explores segregation within cities and the local labor, capital, and housing market dynamics that give rise to differential patterns of inequality across metropolitan areas. Freedman was previously an Associate Professor of Economics at Cornell University and has held visiting positions at the Wharton School and Princeton University. Freedman’s research has been published in leading economics and urban studies journals including the Economic Journal, the Journal of Urban Economics, the Journal of Public Economics, the Journal of Human Resources, and the Journal of Economic Geography.

    Selected Publications

    Freedman, Matthew, N. Baum-Snow and R. Pavan. Forthcoming. Why Has Urban Inequality Increased? American Economic Journal: Applied Economics.

    Freedman, Matthew, E. Owens and S. Bohn. Forthcoming. Immigration, Employment Opportunities, and Criminal Behavior. American Economic Journal: Economic Policy.

    Freedman, Matthew. 2017. Persistence in Industrial Policy Impacts: Evidence from Depression-Era Mississippi. Journal of Urban Economics, 102: 34-51.

    Freedman, Matthew. 2013. “Targeted Business Incentives and Local Labor Markets.” Journal of Human Resources 48(2): 311-344.

    Freedman, Matthew. 2012. “Teaching New Markets Old Tricks: The Effects of Subsidized Investment on Low-Income Neighborhoods.” Journal of Public Economics 96(11-12): 1000-1014.

    Freedman, Matthew and Renata Kosova. 2012. “Agglomeration, Product Heterogeneity, and Firm Entry.” Journal of Economic Geography.” 12(3): 601-626.

    Affiliated PhD Student

    Ari Friedman

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    MD/PhD Candidate in Health Economics, University of Pennsylvania

    About

    Ari B. Friedman is a Fellow at the Leonard Davis Institute and a sixth-year M.D./Ph.D. student in health economics at the University of Pennsylvania's Perelman School of Medicine and the Wharton School. His research interests include the industrial organization of the unscheduled care system (primary care clinics, urgent care and retail clinics, and emergency departments), access to care and insurance, and financially integrating population health into the medical system. His work has been cited more than 600 times, with an h-index of 8.

    Selected Publications

    Friedman AB. Comment on Economic Incentives and Use of the Intensive Care Unit. JAMA 2014. 311(22):2336-2337.

    Rhodes KV, Kenney GM, Friedman AB, Saloner B, Lawson CC, Chearo D, Wissoker D, Polsky D. Primary Care Access for New Patients on the Eve of Health Care Reform. JAMA Int Med 2014.

    Becker NV, Friedman AB. Emergency Department, Heal Thyself. Am J Emerg Med 2014. 32(2):175-177.

    Friedman AB, Mendola T. To Cover Their Child, One Couple Navigates A Health Insurance Maze In Pennsylvania. Health Affairs2013. 32(5):994-997.

    Friedman AB, Becker N. Understanding the Individual Mandate's SCOTUS Pivot Points. LDI Health Economist. April 2012.VIDEO

    Penn IUR Scholar

    George Galster

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    Clarence Hilberry Professor of Urban Affairs, Department of Urban Studies Planning, Wayne State University

    About

    George Galster is the Clarence Hilberry Professor of Urban Affairs at the Department of Urban Studies and Planning at Wayne State University. Galster has been a consultant to the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, U.S. Department of Justice, numerous municipalities, community organizations, and civil rights groups.  He has provided housing policy consultations to governments in Australia, China, France, Scotland and the United States. Galster’s areas of interest are metropolitan housing markets, racial discrimination and segregation, neighborhood dynamics, residential reinvestment, community lending and insurance patterns, and the interrelationship between neighborhood contexts and social inequality. He has published more than 130 peer-reviewed articles on a variety of urban issues. 

    Selected Publications

    Raleigh, Erica and George Galster. Forthcoming. Neighborhood Deterioration, Abandonment and Crime Dynamics. Journal of Urban Affairs.

    Hedman, Lina and George Galster. 2013. Neighborhood Income Sorting and the Effects of Neighborhood Income Mix on Income: A Holistic Empirical Exploration. Urban Studies, 50(1): 107-127.

    Galster, George. 2012. Driving Detroit: The Quest for Respect in the Motor City. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.

    Price, Gwylim, Yu Chen, and George Galster. 2011. The Impact of Floods on House Prices: An Imperfect Information Approach with Myopia and Amnesia. Housing Studies 26(2): 259-279.

    Galster, George. 2008. Quantifying the Effect of Neighborhood on Individuals: Challenges, Alternative Approaches, and Promising Directions. Schmollers Jahrbuch, 128: 1-42.

    Galster, George, Peter Tatian, and John Accordino. 2006. Targeting Investments for Neighborhood Revitalization. Journal of the American Planning Association, 72(4): 457-474.

    Faculty Fellow

    Richard Gelles

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    Former Dean, School of Social Policy & Practice; Joanne and Raymond Welsh Chair of Child Welfare and Family Violence

    Director for the Center for Research on Youth and Social Policy, Department of Child Welfare and Family Violence

    Co-Director, Field Center for Children's Policy Practice and Research

    About

    Richard J. Gelles is Joanne and Raymond Welsh Chair of Child Welfare and Family Violence, Director for the Center for Research on Youth and Social Policy, Co-Director of the Field Center for Children’s Policy Practice and Research, and former Dean of the School of Social Policy & Practice. Gelles is an internationally known expert in domestic violence and child welfare and was influential in the passage of the Adoption and Safe Families Act of 1997. Gelles is the author of the highly influential book The Violent Home, which was the first systematic investigation to provide empirical data on domestic violence. His more recent books have also made a significant impact in the study of child welfare and family violence. He is the author of 24 books and more than 100 articles, chapters and papers. 

    Selected Publications

    Gelles, Richard. 2017. Intimate Violence and Abuse in Families 4th Edition. New York: Oxford University Press.

    Gelles, Richard. 2016. “Why the American Child Welfare System is Not Child Centered.” William and Mary Bill of Rights Journal 24: 733-753

    Gelles, Richard J. 2011. The Third Lie: Why Government Programs Don’t Work—and a Proposal for One that Would. Philadelphia, PA: University of Pennsylvania Press.

    Loseke, Donilene R., Richard J. Gelles, and Mary Cavanaugh. 2005. Current Controversies on Family Violence 2nd edition. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications. 

    Gelles, Richard. 1974. The Violent Home: A Study of Physical Aggression Between Husbands and Wives. Beverly Hills, California: Sage Publications, Inc. 

    Fellow

    Angela Glover Blackwell

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    President and CEO, PolicyLink

    Areas of Interest

      About

      Angela Glover Blackwell, President and CEO, started PolicyLink in 1999 and continues to drive its mission of advancing economic and social equity. Under Angela’s leadership, PolicyLink has gained national prominence in the movement to use public policy to improve access and opportunity for all low-income people and communities of color, particularly in the areas of health, housing, transportation, and infrastructure. Prior to founding PolicyLink, Angela served as Senior VP at the Rockefeller Foundation. A lawyer by training, she gained national recognition as founder of the Oakland (CA) Urban Strategies Council. From 1977 to 1987, Angela was a partner at Public Advocates. Angela is the co-author of Uncommon Common Ground: Race and America’s Future (W.W. Norton & Co., 2010). In 2013, Angela and PolicyLink collaborated with the Center for American Progress to write and release All In Nation: An America that Works for All.  Angela serves on numerous boards, including the Children’s Defense Fund and the W. Haywood Burns Institute. She advises the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve as one of 15 members of its Community Advisory Council. Angela earned a bachelor’s degree from Howard University, and a law degree from the University of California, Berkeley.

      Selected Publications

      Blackwell, Angela Glover. 2016, forthcoming. The Curb-Cut Effect. Stanford Social Innovation Review 14.1.

      Blackwell, Angela Glover. 2015. Race, Place, and Financial Security: Building Equitable Communities of Opportunity. In What It’s Worth: Strengthening the Financial Future of Families, Communities and the Nation, 105-112. L. Choi, D. Erickson, K. Griffin, A. Levere & E. Seidman, (eds.) Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco and CFED.

      Blackwell, Angela Glover. 2014. Foreword. In Worlds Apart: Poverty and Politics in Rural America, Second Edition, by Cynthia Duncan. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press.

      Blackwell, Angela Glover and Neera Tanden. 2013. Preface. In All-In Nation: An America that Works for All. PolicyLink and the Center for American Progress.

      Blackwell, Angela Glover, Stewart Kwoh and Manuel Pastor. 2010. Uncommon Common Ground: Race and America’s Future. New York, NY: W.W. Norton & Co., Inc.

      Fellow

      Laurie Goodman

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      Co-Director, Housing Finance Policy Center, Urban Institute

      Areas of Interest

        About

        Laurie Goodman is codirector of the Housing Finance Policy Center at the Urban Institute. The center is dedicated to providing policymakers with data-driven analyses of housing finance policy issues that they can depend on for relevance, accuracy, and independence. Before joining Urban in 2013, Goodman spent 30 years as an analyst and research department manager at a number of Wall Street firms. From 2008 to 2013, she was a senior managing director at Amherst Securities Group, LP, where her strategy effort became known for its analysis of housing policy issues. From 1993 to 2008, Goodman was head of global fixed income research and manager of US securitized products research at UBS and predecessor firms, which were ranked number one by Institutional Investor for 11 straight years. Before that, she was a senior fixed income analyst, a mortgage portfolio manager, and a senior economist at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York. She was inducted into the Fixed Income Analysts Hall of Fame in 2009. Goodman is on the board of directors of MFA Financial, is an advisor to Amherst Capital Management, and is a member of the Bipartisan Policy Center’s Housing Commission, the Federal Reserve Bank of New York’s Financial Advisory Roundtable, and the New York State Mortgage Relief Incentive Fund Advisory Committee. She has published more than 200 journal articles and has coauthored and coedited five books. Goodman has a BA in mathematics from the University of Pennsylvania and an MA and PhD in economics from Stanford University.

        Penn IUR Scholar

        Richard K. Green

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        Director, University of Southern California Lusk Center for Real Estate; Lusk Chair in Real Estate

        Professor, USC Sol Price School of Public Policy and the Marshall School of Business, University of Southern California

        Areas of Interest

          About

          Richard K. Green is the Director of the University of Southern California (USC) Lusk Center for Real Estate. Green is also the Lusk Chair in Real Estate and Professor at both the USC Sol Price School of Public Policy and the Marshall School of Business. Before joining USC, Green was the Oliver T. Carr Jr., Chair of Real Estate Finance at the George Washington University School of Business. He also taught real estate finance and economics courses at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and was principal economist and director of financial strategy and policy analysis at Freddie Mac. More recently, Green was a Visiting Professor of Real Estate at the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School. Green’s areas of expertise include real estate, housing markets, real estate finance and economics, mortgage finance, land policy, urban policy, transportation, tax policy, and housing policy. He is a member of two academic journal editorial boards and a reviewer for several others. 

          Selected Publications

          Green, Richard, and P. Hendershott. Forthcoming/ Separating the Impacts of Age and Birth Date on Retail Sales; Journal of Shopping Center Research.

          Green, Richard, and J. Schuetz. 2014. Is The Art Market More Bourgeois Than Bohemian?; Journal of Regional Science, 54(2,):273–303.

          Green, Richard K. 2011. Thoughts on Rental Housing Market and Policy. Cityscape, A Journal of Policy, Development and Research, 13(2).

          Green, Richard K. and A. Reschovsky. 2011. “Using Tax Policy to Subsidize Homeownership.” In Public Spending and Incentives for Community Development Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, Aspen Institute, A. Staiger, ed.

          Green, R., and Susan Wachter. 2008. The Housing Finance Revolution (Proceedings of the 31st Annual Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City Economic Symposium).

          Faculty Fellow

          Pam Grossman

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          Dean, George and Diane Weiss Professor of Education, Graduate School of Education, University of Pennsylvania

          School/Department

          Areas of Interest

            About

            Pam Grossman joined Penn as the Dean of the Graduate School of Education in January 2015. A distinguished scholar, she came to Penn from Stanford University’s School of Education, where she was the Nomellini-Olivier Professor of Education. At Stanford she founded and led the Center to Support Excellence in Teaching and established the Hollyhock Fellowship for early career teachers in underserved schools. Before joining Stanford, she was the Boeing Professor of Teacher Education at the University of Washington. Dr. Grossman serves on the boards of some of the nation’s foremost organizations for promoting rigorous educational research and teacher excellence. She was elected to the National Academy of Education in 2009 and currently sits on the Academy’s Board of Directors. She is Vice Chair of the Spencer Foundation Board of Directors and is an incoming member of the Board of the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. She also served as Member at Large and Vice President of the Division on Teaching and Teacher Education for the American Educational Research Association.

            Selected Publications

            Grossman, P., Cohen, J., Ronfeldt, M., & Brown, L. (2014).  The test matters: The relationship between classroom observation scores and teacher value added on multiple types of assessment. Educational Researcher, 43: 293-303

            Grossman, P., Cohen, J., & Brown, L. (2014).  Understanding instructional quality in English Language Arts: Variations in the relationship between PLATO and value-added by content and context.  In T. Kane, K. Kerr, & R. Pianta  (Eds.).  Designing teacher evaluation systems: New guidance from the  Measures of Effective Teaching project.  John Wiley & Sons.

            Grossman, P., Loeb, S., Cohen, J., & Wyckoff, J. (2013).  Measure for measure: The relationship between measures of instructional practice in middle school English Language Arts and teachers' value-added scores.  American Journal of Education, 119(3), 445-470.

            Hill, H. & Grossman, P. (2013). Learning from teacher evaluations: Challenges and opportunities. Harvard Education Press, 371-384.

            Boyd, D, Grossman, P., Hammerness, K., Lankford, H., Loeb, S., & Ronfeldt, M. (2012). Recruiting effective math teachers: Evidence from New York City.  American Educational Research Journal. 49 (4), 1008-1047.

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