People

Penn IUR is affiliated with more than 200 experts in the field of urbanism. Its Faculty Fellows program identifies faculty at the University of Pennsylvania with a demonstrated interest in urban research; the Penn IUR Scholars program identifies urban scholars outside of Penn; and the Penn IUR Fellows program identifies expert urban practitioners. Together, these programs foster a community of scholars and encourage cross-disciplinary collaboration.

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Penn IUR Scholar

Shaun R. Harper

x

Executive Director, Southern California Center on Race & Equity

School/Department

Areas of Interest

    About

    Shaun R. Harper was Associate Professor and Director of the Center for the Study of Race and Equity in Education in the Higher Education Division of the Graduate School of Education. He now acts as Founding Executive Director for the Southern California Center on Race & Equity. His research examines race and gender in higher education, Black male college access and achievement, and college student engagement. He has published eleven books and more than eighty peer-reviewed journal articles and other academic publications. His research has been praised by the Association for the Study of Higher Education (2008 Early Career Award); the National Association of Student Personnel Administrators (2010 Outstanding Contribution to Research Award, 2012 Robert H. Shaffer Award for Faculty Excellence, and 2013 Pillar of the Profession); and the American Educational Research Association (2010 Division G Early Career Award). He is principal investigator of the New York City Black and Latino Male High School Achievement Study.

     

    Selected Publications

    Harper, Shaun R., E.J. Smith, and C.H.F. Davis III. Forthcoming. A critical race case analysis of Black undergraduate student success at an urban university. Urban Education.

    Harper, Shaun R and J. Luke Wood. 2014. Advancing Black Male Student Success from Preschool through Ph.D. Stylus Publishing.

    Harper, Shaun R. 2013. Am I My Brother’s Teacher? Black Undergraduates, Peer Pedagogies, and Racial Socialization in Predominantly White Postsecondary Contexts. Review of Research in Education, 37: 183-211.

    Schuh, John H., Susan R. Jones, and Shaun R. Harper. 2011. Student Services: A Handbook for the Profession (5th edition). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

    Harper, Shaun R. 2012. Race without Racism: How Higher Education Researchers Minimize Racist Institutional Norms. The Review of Higher Education, 36(1): 9-29.

    Harper, S. R., and C. H. F. Davis III. 2012. They (Don’t) Care about Education: A Counternarrative on Black Male Students’ Responses to Inequitable Schooling. Educational Foundations, 26(1), 103-120.

     

    Faculty Fellow

    Amy Hillier

    x

    Associate Professor

    About

    Amy Hillier is Associate Professor in the Department of City and Regional Planning in the School of Design, with a secondary faculty appointment in the School of Social Policy & Practice. She teaches courses relating to GIS, built environment and public health, and community development in city planning, urban studies, public health, and social work. Her research focuses on issues of geographic disparities and access to services and resources in disadvantaged communities and has included GIS applications in redlining and housing discrimination, affordable housing, and public health. Her dissertation, funded by the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), considered the impact of the Home Owner’s Loan Corporation on lending in Philadelphia. With her focus on public health and the built environment, she frequently collaborates with colleagues at the Perelman School of Medicine and at The Food Trust.

     

    Selected Publications

    Hillier, Amy and Benjamin Chrisinger. 2017. “The Reality of Urban Food Deserts and What Low-Income Food Shoppers Need.” In Social Policy and Social Justice, edited by John L Jackson, Jr. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.

    Lapham, Sandra C, Deborah A Cohen, Bing Han, Stephanie Williamson, Kelly R Evenson, Thomas L McKenzie, Amy Hillier, and Phillip Ward. 2016. “How important is perception of safety to park use? A four-city survey.” Urban Studies 53(12).

    Cannuscio, CC, A Hillier, A Karpyn, and K Glanz. 2014. “The social dynamics of healthy food shopping and store choice in an urban environment.” Social Science and Medicine 122.

    Mayer, Victoria L, Amy Hillier, Marcus A Bachhuber, Judith A Long. 2014. “Food Insecurity, Neighborhood Food Access, and Food Assistance in Philadelphia.” Journal of Urban Health 91(6).

     

    Penn IUR Scholar

    Harry J. Holzer

    x

    Professor of Public Policy, McCourt School of Public Policy at Georgetown

    Areas of Interest

      About

      Harry J. Holzer is a Professor of Public Policy in the McCourt School of Public Policy at Georgetown University. He is also an Institute Fellow at the American Institutes for Research. Since receiving his Ph.D. in economics from Harvard in 1983, Holzer has also served as a Professor of Economics at Michigan State University, the Chief Economist of the U.S. Department of Labor (in the Clinton Administration),  and an Institute Fellow at the Urban Institute. He has been the co-founder and co-director of the Georgetown Center on Poverty, Inequality, and Public Policy. He serves on the Board of Directors of the National Skills Coalition and the Economic Mobility Corporation. Holzer has authored or edited eleven books and has published several dozen articles in peer-reviewed journals, focusing mostly on the low-wage labor market. His policy interests include workforce development, EEO and affirmative action, the Earned Income Tax Credit, Pell Grant reform, immigration reform, and removing barriers to work for ex-offenders.

       

      Selected Publications

      Holzer, Harry J. and Sandy Baum. 2017. Making College Work: Pathways to Success for Disadvantaged Students. Brookings Press.

      Holzer, Harry J. Julia Lane, David Rosenblum, and Fredrik Andersson. 2011. Where Are All the Good Jobs Going? New York: Russell Sage Foundation.

      Edelman, Peter B., Harry J. Holzer, and Paul Offner. 2006. Reconnecting Disadvantaged Young Men. Washington, DC: The Urban Institute.

      Andersson, Fredrik, Harry J. Holzer, and Julia Lane. 2005. Moving Up or Moving On: Who Advances in the Low-Wage Labor Market. Russell Sage Foundation.

      Holzer, Harry J. 1999. What Employers Want: Job Prospects for Less-educated Workers. New York: Russell Sage Foundation.

      Freeman, Richard B. and Harry J. Holzer, eds. 1986. The Black Youth Employment Crisis. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

       

      Faculty Fellow

      Mark Alan Hughes

      x

      Professor of Practice

      Faculty Director, Kleinman Center for Energy Policy

      About

      Mark Alan Hughes is Professor of Practice in the School of Design and founding Faculty Director of Penn’s Kleinman Center for Energy Policy. He is also the founding Faculty Director of the Fels Policy Research Initiative in the School of Arts and Sciences, a Senior Fellow of the Wharton School’s Initiative for Global Environmental Leadership, and a Distinguished Scholar in Residence at Penn’s Fox Leadership Program. Hughes has published in the leading journals of economic geography, urban economics, political science, policy analysis, and won the National Planning Award for his research in city and regional planning. He was Chief Policy Adviser to Mayor Michael Nutter and the founding Director of Sustainability for the City of Philadelphia, where he led the creation of the city’s Greenworks Plan. He has designed and fielded national policy research projects in a variety of areas including the Bridges to Work program in transportation, the Transitional Work Corporation in job training and placement, the Campaign for Working Families in EITC participation, and the Energy Efficient Buildings Hub in regional economic development. 

       

      Selected Publications

      Hughes, Mark Alan, Cornelia Colijn, and Oscar Serpell. 2017. “Comparative Pathways to Regional Energy Transition.” Kleinman Policy Digest available at http://kleinmanenergy.upenn.edu/pathways.

      Hughes, Mark Alan, Cornelia Colijn, and Oscar Serpell. 2017. “Managing Risk in the Energyshed.” LA+ Journal 6(Fall).

      Hughes, Mark Ala. 2017. “No Acceptable Alternative to Paris.” The Philadelphia Inquirer, June 15. http://kleinmanenergy.upenn.edu/blog/2017/06/12/there-no-acceptable-alternative-paris.

       

      Faculty Fellow

      Robert P. Inman

      x

      Richard King Mellon Professor of Finance

      Professor of Business Economics and Public Policy

      Professor of Real Estate

      School/Department

      Areas of Interest

        About

        Robert P. Inman is the Richard King Mellon Professor of Finance, Professor of Business Economics and Public Policy, and Professor of Real Estate at the Wharton School. His primary research interests include public finance, urban fiscal policy, and political economy. He is a Research Associate for the National Bureau of Economic Research and a Visiting Senior Research Economist for the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia. He has advised the City of Philadelphia, the State of Pennsylvania, U.S. Treasury, U.S. Department of Education, U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, Republic of South Africa, National Bank of Sri Lanka, and others on matters of fiscal policy. 

         

        Selected Publications

        Carlino, Gerald and Robert P Inman. 2016. “Fiscal Stimulus in Economic Unions: What Role for States?” Tax Policy and the Economy 30(1).

        Inman, Robert P. and Daniel L. Rubinfeld. 2013. “Understanding the Democratic Transition in South Africa.” American Law and Economics Review 15(1): 1-38.

        Inman, Robert, ed. 2009. Making Cities Work: Prospects and Policies for Urban America. Princeton: Princeton University Press.

        Inman, Robert P. 2008. “Federalism’s Values and the Value of Federalism.” NBER Working Paper No. 13735.

        Craig, Steven, Andrew Haughwout, Robert P. Inman, and Thomas Luce. 2004. “Local Revenue Hills: Evidence from Four U.S. Cities.” The Review of Economics and Statistics 86(2): 570-585.  

         

        Faculty Fellow

        Roberta Iversen

        x

        Associate Professor

        About

        Roberta Iversen is Associate Professor in the School of Social Policy & Practice. She uses ethnographic research to extend knowledge about economic mobility, especially in urban families who are working but still poor and recently in exurban middle-income families as well. Her ethnographic accounts illuminate what low-income working parents need from secondary schools, job training organizations, businesses and firms, their children’s public schools, and public policy in order to earn enough to support their families through work. Housing policy in Milwaukee, WI and workforce development programs and policy in New Orleans, LA, Seattle, WA, St. Louis, MO, and Philadelphia, PA have been improved by findings from Iversen’s research. Iversen is also working on a book manuscript, tentatively called Everyday Works in the Land of (Limited) Opportunity. . The book, based on qualitative research she has conducted since the 1980s, examines the experiences of individuals and families with labor-market work in relation to changes in the labor market over time. It concludes by proposing new ideas about “work”—including redefining what counts as “work” in the U.S.

         

        Selected Publications

        Parsons Leigh, J., A. Gauthier, R.R. Iversen, S. Luhr, L. and Napolitano. 2016. “Caught in between: Neoliberal rhetoric and middle-income families in Canada and the United States.” Journal of Family Studies.

        Iversen, R. R., L. Napolitano, and F. F. Furstenberg. 2011. “Middle-income Families in the Economic Downturn: Challenges and Management Strategies over Time.” Longitudinal and Life Course Studies: International Journal 2(3): 286-300.

        Iversen, R. R. and A. L. Armstrong. 2008. “Hurricane Katrina and New Orleans: What Might an Embeddedness Perspective Offer Disaster Research and Planning?” Analyses of Social Issues and Public Policy 8(1): 183-209.

        Iversen, R. R. and A. L. Armstrong. 2006. Jobs Aren’t Enough: Toward a New Economic Mobility for Low-income Families. Philadelphia: Temple University Press.

        Iversen, R. R. 2002. Moving Up is a Steep Climb. Baltimore, MD: The Annie E. Casey Foundation.

         

        Penn IUR Scholar

        Brian A. Jacob

        x

        Walter H. Annenberg Professor of Education Policy, Professor of Economics, and Professor of Education, University of Michigan

        Areas of Interest

          About

          Brian Jacob is the Walter H. Annenberg Professor of Education Policy, Professor of Economics, and Professor of Education at the University of Michigan. He is Co-Director of the Education Policy Initiative (EPI) and former Director of the Center for Local, State and Urban Policy (CLOSUP), as well as a Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER). He has previously served as a policy analyst in the NYC Mayor’s Office and taught middle school in East Harlem. His primary fields of interest are labor economics, program evaluation, and the economics of education. His current research focuses on school accountability, teacher labor markets and virtual schooling. In 2008, Jacob received the David N. Kershaw Prize, an award given every two years to honor persons who, at under the age of forty, have made a distinguished contribution to the field of public policy.

           

          Selected Publications

          Dee, T. S., B. A. Jacob, and Nathaniel L. Schwartz. Forthcoming. The Effects of No Child Left Behind on Education Finance and Practice. Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis.

          Jacob, Brian A., Ludwig, Jens and Douglas Miller 2013. The Effects of Housing and Neighborhood Conditions on Child Mortality. Journal of Health Economics, 32(1): 195-206.

          Jacob, Brian A.  2011. Do Principals Fire the Worst Teachers? Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis, 33(4): 403-434.

          Jacob, Brian A. and Jens Ludwig. 2011.  Educational Interventions: Their Effects on the Achievement of Poor Children.  In Neighborhood and Life Chances: How Place Matters in Modern America,  Harriet B. Newburger, Eugénie L. Birch, and Susan M. Wachter, eds. Philadelphia, PA: University of Pennsylvania Press.

          Cullen, J. and Jacob, B. 2008.  Is Gaining Access to a Selective Elementary School Gaining Ground?  Evidence from Randomized Lotteries. In An Economics Perspective on the Problems of Disadvantaged Youth Jonathan, Gruber, ed.  Chicago: University of Chicago Press. 

           

          Penn IUR Scholar

          Ferdous Jahan

          x

          Associate Director, Fox Leadership International, and College of Liberal and Professional Studies, University of Pennsylvania

          Areas of Interest

            About

            Ferdous Jahan is Associate Director, Fox Leadership International, and College of Liberal and Professional Studies at the University of Pennsylvania. Previously she was Professor of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and is Academic Coordinator at the BRAC Institute of Governance and Development where she taught courses on development, management of land, governance, comparative public administration, financial administration, and political science. She is also an expert in program evaluation and policy research. She has designed and conducted a variety of qualitative studies as well as many quantitative surveys and research. Her current research involves governance, social protection, urban poverty, legal empowerment of the poor and women¹s empowerment issues in developing nations.

             

            Selected Publications

            Jahan, Ferdous, et al. 2013. State of Cities: Re-thinking Urban Governance in Narayanganj, Chapters 1-3, 6. Dhaka, Bangladesh: Institute of Governance Studies, BRAC University.

            Manoj Roy, David Hulme and Ferdous Jahan. 2013. Contrasting Adaptation Responses by Squatters and Low-Income Tenants in Khulna Bangladesh. Environment & Urbanization, 25(1): 1­20.

            Jahan, Ferdous and Asif M. Shahan. 2013. Power and Influence of Islam-Based Political Parties in Bangladesh: Perception versus Reality. Journal of Asian and African Studies. (Published online on June 26, 2013.)

            Jahan, Ferdous, David Hulme, Manoj Roy, and Asif Shahan. 2012. Reframing the Problem: From Climate Change in Urban Areas to Urban Governance in an Era of Climate Change. London: Department for International Development.

            Ferdous Jahan and Asif M. Shahan. 2012. Bureau Bashing and Public Service Motivation: A Case for the Civil Service of Bangladesh. International Journal of Public Administration, 35(4): 272-284.

            Manoj Roy, Ferdous Jahan and David Hulme. 2012. Community and Institutional Responses to the Challenges Facing Poor Urban People in Khulna, Bangladesh in an Era of Climate Change.  BWPI, University of Manchester Working Paper 163/2012.

             

            Penn IUR Scholar

            Paul A. Jargowsky

            x

            Professor of Public Policy and Director, Center for Urban Research and Urban Education, Rutgers University

            Senior Research Affiliate, National Poverty Center, University of Michigan

            Areas of Interest

              About

              Paul A. Jargowsky is Professor of Public Policy and Director, Center for Urban Research and Urban Education at Rutgers University. His primary areas of research focus on racial and economic segregation, the impacts of economic and spatial inequality, and the origins and consequences of exclusionary suburban development patterns. Prior to his position as Professor of Public Policy at Rutgers University, he was the Project Director for the New York State Task Force on Poverty and Welfare Reform and was also involved in fair housing and desegregation litigation as a consultant and expert witness. Jargowsky contributed to the report of the Task Force, The New Social Contract: Rethinking the Nature and Purpose of Public Assistance, which was extremely influential in reshaping the welfare reform debate. His book Poverty and Place was recognized as the “Best Book in Urban Affairs Published in 1997 or 1998” by the Urban Affairs Association.

               

              Selected Publications

              Jargowsky, Paul A. and Beth Rabinowitz. Forthcoming. Rethinking Coup Risk: Rural Coalitions and Coup-proofing in Sub-Saharan Africa. Armed Forces and Society.

              Jargowsky, Paul A., 2016. Are Minority Neighborhoods a Disaster? Commentary, Race and Inequality, Century Foundation. 

              Jargowsky, Paul A. and Jeongdai Kim. 2009. The Information Theory of Segregation: Uniting Segregation and Inequality in a Common Framework, Research on Economic Inequality, 17: 3-31.

              Kim, Jeongdai and Paul A. Jargowsky. 2009. The GINI Coefficient and Segregation on a Continuous Variable. Research on Economic Inequality, 17: 1129-1151.

              Jargowsky, Paul A. 2003. Stunning Progress, Hidden Problems: The Dramatic Decline of Concentrated Poverty in the 1990s. Washington, DC: The Brookings Institution.

              Jargowsky, Paul A. 1997. Poverty and Place: Ghettos, Barrios, and the American City. New York: Russell Sage Foundation.

               

              Penn IUR Scholar

              Rucker C. Johnson

              x

              Associate Professor, Goldman School of Public Policy, University of California Berkeley

              Areas of Interest

                About

                Rucker C. Johnson is Associate Professor at the Goldman School of Public Policy at the University of California-Berkeley. Johnson is also a Faculty Research Fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research, a Faculty Research Fellow at the W.E.B. Du Bois Institute at Harvard, a Research Affiliate at the National Poverty Center at the University of Michigan, and a Research Affiliate at the Institute for Poverty Research at the University of Wisconsin. Johnson’s research is primarily concerned with the role of poverty and inequality in affecting life chances and opportunities. He looks at problems commonly associated with poverty such as low-wage labor markets, spatial mismatch, the societal consequences of incarceration, the impacts of childhood school and neighborhood quality on adult health and socioeconomic success, and educational attainment. 

                 

                Selected Publications

                Johnson, Rucker C., Ariel Kalil, and Rachel Dunifon. 2010. Mothers’ Work and Children’s Lives: Low-income Families After Welfare Reform. Kalamazoo, MI: Upjohn Institute Press.

                Johnson, Rucker C. 2011. Health Dynamics and the Evolution of Health Inequality over the Life Course: The Importance of Neighborhood and Family Background. B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy: Advances.

                Johnson, Rucker C., Ariel Kalil, and Rachel Dunifon. 2011. Employment Patterns of Less-Skilled Workers: Links to Children’s Behavior and Academic Progress. Demography, 47(3).

                Johnson, Rucker C. 2010. The Health Returns of Education Policies: From Preschool to High School & Beyond. American Economic Review Papers and Proceedings.

                 

                Fellow

                Abha Joshi-Ghani

                x

                Director, Knowledge Exchange and Learning, The World Bank, Washington, DC

                Areas of Interest

                  About

                  Abha Joshi-Ghani is the Director for Knowledge Exchange and Learning (LLIKL) at the Leadership, Learning and Innovation Vice Presidency of the World Bank. Before joining LLI she headed the World Bank’s Global Urban Development Practice where she oversaw the World Bank’s work on Urban Policy and Strategy and Knowledge and Learning. She was also the Head of the Global Urbanization Knowledge Platform, a multi- partner initiative of the World Bank until 2012. She led the World Bank’s Urban Strategy in 2010. 

                  Ms. Joshi-Ghani is the Vice-Chair of the Global Agenda Council on Urbanization of the World Economic Forum. She is also the co-editor of the forthcoming book “Rethinking Cities” with Professor Edward Glaeser.  She has worked primarily on infrastructure finance and urban development at the World Bank. Her regional experience in the World Bank includes South and East Asia, Africa and the Middle East. 

                   

                  Selected Publications

                  Glaeser, Edward; Joshi-Ghani, Abha. 2013. The Urban Imperative: Toward Shared Prosperity. World Bank, Washington, DC. 

                   

                   

                  Penn IUR Scholar

                  Kyung-Hwan Kim

                  x

                  Professor of Economics, Department of Economics, Sogang University

                  Areas of Interest

                    About

                    Kyung-Hwan Kim is a professor of economics at Sogang University where he has been on the faculty since 1988 and was academic dean from 2003 till 2006. He is a former vice minister of the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure and Transport of the Republic of Korea (May 2015- June 2017). Mr. Kim is a fellow at the Weimer Graduate School of Advanced Studies in Real Estate and Urban Land Economic, a Penn Institute for Urban Research (IUR) scholar, a fellow of the Asian Real Estate Society (AsRES), a member of the editorial board of Journal of Housing Economics, and of the international advisory board of Housing Studies. Dr. Kim taught at Syracuse University (1986-88), University of Wisconsin-Madison (2002-03), and Singapore Management University (2010-11). He was president of Korea Research Institute for Human Settlements (2013-2015), urban finance advisor at the UN Centre for Human Settlements (Habitat) (1994-96), and president of the AsRES (2001-02). He served on various government committees of Korea on housing, urban planning and local public finance, as well as working as consultant for the World Bank and several other international organizations. Dr. Kim has published in major journals in urban economics and real estate. He received his PhD in economics from Princeton University in 1987.

                     

                    Selected Publications

                    Bertrand Renaud, Kyung-Hwan Kim and Man Cho. 2016. Dynamics of Housing in East Asia, Wiley and Blackwell.

                    Kyung-Hwan Kim, Sock Yong Phang and Susan Wachter. 2012. “Price Elasticity of Housing Supply”, in International Encyclopedia for Housing and Home, Vol 7. Oxford: Elsevier; 66–74

                    Kyung-Hwan Kim and Man Cho. 2014. Edited by H. Kent Baker and Peter Chinloy, “Real Estate Cycles: International Episodes”, in Private Real Estate Markets and Investments, Edited by H. Kent Baker and Peter Chinloy, Oxford University Press, 32-48 

                    Kyung-Hwan Kim and Man Cho. 2014. “Mortgage Markets: International”, in Public Real Estate Markets and Investments, Edited by H. Kent Baker and Peter Chinloy, Oxford University Press, 97-120 

                    Kyung-Hwan Kim and Young Joon Park. 2015. “International Comovement of East Asia’s Housing Price Cycle and China Effect in Greater China”, Asian Economic Papers, 1-21.

                    Kyung-Hwan Kim and Miseon Park. 2016. “Housing Policies in the Republic of Korea”, in Naoyuki Yoshino and Matthias Helble, eds., The Housing Challenge in Emerging Asia: Options and Solutions, Asia Development Bank Institute, 92-125

                     

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