People

Penn IUR is affiliated with more than 200 experts in the field of urbanism. Its Faculty Fellows program identifies faculty at the University of Pennsylvania with a demonstrated interest in urban research; the Penn IUR Scholars program identifies urban scholars outside of Penn; and the Penn IUR Fellows program identifies expert urban practitioners. Together, these programs foster a community of scholars and encourage cross-disciplinary collaboration.

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Affiliated PhD Student

Elaine Leigh

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Doctoral Candidate, Graduate School of Education, University of Pennsylvania

School/Department

Areas of Interest

    About

    Elaine Leigh is a first-year Ph.D. Student in Higher Education at Penn GSE. Her research interests include college access and success, diversity in higher education, and K-16 state and federal policies impacting educational preparation pipelines. Previously, Elaine was Director of Support Services at Steppingstone Scholars, a Philadelphia nonprofit that prepares educationally underserved students for college and career success. In this role, Elaine developed and led several key initiatives including an annual citywide college conference, two summer academic learning programs, and school-year programming involving tutoring, mentoring, career development, college readiness, and individual college counseling. As a Teach For America alumna, Elaine began her career in education teaching middle school science in the School District of Philadelphia and also served as a college counselor for ASPIRA’s TRIO Talent Search program. Additionally, Elaine stays engaged in the Philadelphia community as a board member for SEAMAAC, an immigrant and refugee social service agency, and has previously served on the boards of PhilaSoup and The Spruce Foundation. A native of Seattle, WA, Elaine holds a B.A. in Psychology from the University of Washington and M.S.Ed. in Urban Education from the University of Pennsylvania.

     

    Faculty Fellow

    John MacDonald

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    Professor of Criminology and Sociology

    Penny and Robert A. Fox Faculty Director, Fels Institute of Government

    About

    John M. MacDonald is Penny and Robert A. Fox Faculty Director of Penn’s Fels Institute of Government and Professor of Criminology and Sociology in the Department of Criminology in the School of Arts and Sciences. He focuses primarily on the study of interpersonal violence, race, and ethnic disparities in criminal justice, and the effect of public policy responses on crime. His contributions to public policy research include numerous studies using rigorous, quasi-experimental and experimental designs showing the effects of social policies on crime, of institutional social justice reforms on crime, and more recently, the health effects of various policy interventions. He was awarded the Young Experimental Scholar Award by the Academy of Experimental Criminology for significant contributions to experimental research. He also received the David N. Kershaw Award for distinguished contribution to the field of public policy analysis and management from the American Association of Public Policy Analysis and Management. He is an elected Fellow of the Academy of Experimental Criminology. His latest urban research examines the remediating vacant land and abandoned houses on crime.

     

    Selected Publications

    Ridgeway, Greg and John M MacDonald. 2017. “Effect of Rail Transit on Crime: A Study of Los Angeles from 1988 to 2014.” Journal of Quantitative Criminology 33 (2): 277-291.

    Chirico, Michael, Robert Inman, Charles Loeffler, John MacDonald, and Holger Sieg. 2017 “Procrastination and Property Tax Compliance: Evidence from a Field Experiment.” National Bureau of Economic Research 23243.

    Kondo, MC, SH Han, GH Donovan, and JM MacDonald. 2017. “The association between urban trees and crime: Evidence from the spread of the emerald ash borer in Cincinnati.” Landscape and Urban Planning 157: 193-199

    MacDonald, JM, N Nicosia, and BD Ukert. 2017. “Do Schools Cause Crime in Neighborhoods? Evidence from the Opening of Schools in Philadelphia.” Journal of Quantitative Criminology 1-24.

    Branas, CC, MC Kondo, SM Murphy, EC South, D Polsky, and JM MacDonald. 2016. “Urban blight remediation as a cost-beneficial solution to firearm violence.” American Journal of Public Health 106(12): 2158-2164.

     

    Penn IUR Scholar

    Gary W. McDonogh

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    Professor, Growth and Structure of Cities Department, Bryn Mawr College

    About

    Gary McDonogh is Professor in the Growth and Structure of Cities Department at Bryn Mawr College. His primary research concerns the exploration of urban life and consciousness, especially in the city of Barcelona. He spent a decade working in Savannah, Georgia, studying race and class relations as well as the narratives and resistances of Savannah’s African-American community. His recent research engages the issues of American suburbia and its cultural significance in a global context. McDonough’s current projects aim to find new and creative ways to understand cities and their dynamic and multifaceted issues. He is in the process of completing a co-edited ethnographic collection on global downtowns which pays special attention to Chinatowns.

     

    Selected Publications

    McDonogh, Gary. 2013. Iberian Worlds. New York: Routledge.

    Wong, by Cindy Hing-Yuk and Gary McDonogh. 2005. Global Hong Kong. New York: Routledge.

    Gregg, Robert, Gary McDonogh, and Cindy Wong. 2001. Encyclopedia of Contemporary American Culture. London: Taylor and Francis.

    McDonogh, Gary. 1993. Black and Catholic in Savannah, Georgia. University of Tennessee Press.

     

    Fellow

    Rolf Pendall

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    Director, Metropolitan Housing and Communities Policy Center, Urban Institute

    About

    Rolf Pendall is Director of the Urban Institute’s Metropolitan Housing and Communities Policy Center, where he leads a team of over forty experts on a broad array of housing, community development, and economic development topics. Pendall’s research expertise includes federal, state, and local affordable housing policy and programs; land-use planning and regulation; metropolitan growth patterns; and racial residential segregation and the concentration of poverty. Pendall currently leads the Institute’s evaluation of the HUD Choice Neighborhoods demonstration and a HUD-funded research study on the transportation needs of housing choice voucher users. Between 1998 and mid-2010, Pendall was Professor in the Department of City and Regional Planning at Cornell University.

     

    Selected Publications

    Pendall, Rolf and Leah Hendey. 2013. A Brief Look at the Early Implementation of Choice Neighborhoods (Research Report). Washington, DC: Urban Institute.

    Pendall, Rolf, Sandra Rosenbloom, Diane Levy, Elizabeth Oo, Gerrit Knaap, Jason Sartori, and Arnab Chakraborty. 2013. Can Federal Efforts Advance Federal and Local De-Siloing? Lessons from the HUD-EPA-DOT Partnership for Sustainable Communities (Research Report). Washington, DC: Urban Institute.

    Pendall, Rolf. 2012. The Next Big Question Facing Cities: Will Millennials Stay? The Atlantic Cities, September 11.

    Pendall, Rolf, Brett Theodos, Kaitlin Franks. 2012. The Built Environment and Household Vulnerability in a Regional Context (Research Brief). Washington, DC: Urban Institute.

    Pendall, Rolf. 2007. The Changing Nature of Housing Markets in Upstate New York. Housing and Society, 34: 65-75.

     

    Penn IUR Scholar

    Steven Raphael

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    Professor of Public Policy, Richard and Rhonda Goldman School of Public Policy, University of California, Berkeley

    About

    Steven Raphael is Professor of Public Policy at the Richard and Rhonda Goldman School of Public Policy at the University of California, Berkeley. His areas of expertise are labor and employment, race and ethnicity, criminal justice, employment discrimination, labor economics, racial inequality, and urban economics. Raphael has authored several research projects investigating the relationship between racial segregation in housing markets and the relative employment prospects of African Americans. He has also written theoretical and empirical papers on the economics of discrimination, the role of access to transportation in determining employment outcomes, the relationship between unemployment and crime, the role of peer influences on youth behavior, the effect of trade unions on wage structures, and homelessness.

     

    Selected Publications

    Raphael, Steven, and R.G. Gonzales Gonzales. 2017. Undocumented Immigrants and
    Their Experience with Illegality, Russell Sage Foundation, Journal of Social Sciences,
    Volume 3 Number 4.

    Raphael, Steven. 2014. The New Scarlet Letter? Negotiating the U.S. Labor Market with a
    Criminal Record, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research, Kalamazoo, MI. 

    Card, David and Steven Raphael, eds. 2013. Immigration, Poverty, and Socioeconomic Inequality. New York: Russell Sage Foundation.

    Raphael, Steven and Michael Stoll. 2013. Why Are So Many Americans in Prison? New York: Russell Sage Foundation.

    Johnson, Rucker and Steven Raphael. 2012. How Much Crime Reduction Does the Marginal Prisoner Buy? Journal of Law and Economics, 55(2): 275-310.

    Raphael, Steven and Michael Stoll, eds. 2009. Do Prisons Make Us Safer? The Benefits and Costs of the Prison Boom. New York: Russell Sage Foundation.

     

    Penn IUR Scholar

    Jesse Rothstein

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    Professor of Public Policy and Economics, University of California Berkeley

    Director, Institute for Research on Labor and Employment

    Areas of Interest

      About

      Jesse Rothstein is Associate Professor at the Goldman School of Public Policy and the Department of Economics at the University of California, Berkeley and a research associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research. His research spans topics including local public finance, school and teacher accountability and performance measurement, higher education admissions, racial gaps in educational and economic outcomes, and tax and transfer policy. From 2003 to 2009, Rothstein was an Assistant Professor of Economics and Public Affairs at Princeton University. In 2009-2010, he served as Senior Economist for labor and education at the Council of Economic Advisers and then as Chief Economist at the US Department of Labor.  His work has been published in the American Economics Review, the Quarterly Journal of Economics, the Journal of Public Economics, the Chicago Law Review, and the American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, among other outlets.

       

      Selected Publications

      Cellini, Stephanie, Fernando Ferreira, and  Jesse Rothstein. 2010. The Value of School Facility Investments: Evidence from a Dynamic Regression Discontinuity Design. Quarterly Journal of Economics, 125(1): 215-261.

      Rothstein, Jesse and Cecilia Rouse. 2011. Constrained After College: Student Loans and Early Career Occupational Choices. Journal of Public Economics, 95(1-2): 149-163.

      Card, David , Alexandre Mas, and Jesse Rothstein. 2008. Tipping and the Dynamics of Segregation. Quarterly Journal of Economics, 123(1): 177-218. 

      Rothstein, Jesse. 2012. The Labor Market Four Years Into the Crisis: Assessing Structural Explanations. Industrial and Labor Relations Review, 65(3): 467-500.

       

      Affiliated PhD Student

      Jeffrey Sharlein

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      Doctoral Candidate in Social Welfare, School of Social Policy and Practice, University of Pennsylvania

      About

      Jeffrey Sharlein is a PhD student in social welfare in the University of Pennsylvania’s School of Social Policy and Practice (SP2).  Prior to entering the program, he worked directly with urban youth in numerous contexts in New York City and Detroit.  Sharlein holds a BA from Wesleyan University and an MSW from Hunter College, where he was awarded the 2006 Jacob Goldfein Award for Scholarship.  A 2012-2013 recipient of SP2’s Chai Doctoral Fellowship, Sharlein’s dissertation research focuses on understanding how inner-city youth who have engaged in serious offending behavior understand that behavior in relation to the neighborhood context.

       

      Fellow

      Margery Austin Turner

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      Senior Vice President for Program Planning and Management at the Urban Institute

      About

      Margery Austin Turner is Senior Vice President for Program Planning and Management at the Urban Institute, where she leads efforts to frame and conduct a forward-looking agenda of policy research.  A nationally recognized expert on urban policy and neighborhood issues, Ms. Turner has analyzed issues of residential location, racial and ethnic discrimination and its contribution to neighborhood segregation and inequality, and the role of housing policies in promoting residential mobility and location choice.

      Ms. Turner served as Deputy Assistant Secretary for Research at the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) from 1993 through 1996, focusing HUD’s research agenda on the problems of racial discrimination, concentrated poverty, and economic opportunity in America’s metropolitan areas. During her tenure, HUD’s research office launched three major social science demonstration projects to test different strategies for helping families from distressed inner-city neighborhoods gain access to opportunities through employment and education.

       

      Selected Publications

      Turner, Margery Austin et al. Housing Discrimination Against Racial and Ethnic Minorities 2012. U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, Office of Housing Development and Research. June 2013.

      Turner, Margery Austin, Austin Nichols and Jennifer Comey. The Benefits of Living in High-Opportunity Neighborhoods: Insights from the Moving to Opportunity Demonstration. The Urban Institute. September 2012.

      Coulton, Claudia J., Brett Theodos, and Margery Austin Turner. Family Mobility and Neighborhood Change: New Evidence and Implications for Community Initiatives. The Urban Institute. November 2009.

      Turner, Margery Austin and Lynette A. Rawlings. Promoting Neighborhood Diversity: Benefits, Barriers, and Strategies. The Urban Institute. August 2009.

      Turner, Margery Austin et al. Quality Schools, Healthy Neighborhoods and the Future of D.C. The Urban Institute. October 2008.

       

      Affiliated PhD Student

      Alexandra Wimberly

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      PhD Candidate in Social Policy and Practice, University of Pennsylvania

      About

      Alexandra Schepens is a Ph.D. student at the University of Pennsylvania School of Social Policy and Practice. Her research looks at the cross-section of criminal justice and substance use. This work aims to develop substance use interventions for people in the criminal justice system with the goal of decreasing the imprisoned population.

       

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