People

Penn IUR is affiliated with more than 200 experts in the field of urbanism. Its Faculty Fellows program identifies faculty at the University of Pennsylvania with a demonstrated interest in urban research; the Penn IUR Scholars program identifies urban scholars outside of Penn; and the Penn IUR Fellows program identifies expert urban practitioners. Together, these programs foster a community of scholars and encourage cross-disciplinary collaboration.

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Emerging Scholar

Arthur Acolin

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Assistant Professor, Department of Real Estate, University of Washington

Areas of Interest

    About

    Arthur Acolin is an Assistant Professor of Real Estate at the University of Washington with a broad interest in housing economics and a focus on international housing policy and finance. He completed his PhD in Urban Planning and Development at the University of Southern California in 2017. Recent research projects include a study of the presence of discrimination against different immigrant groups in the rental market in France with Raphael Bostic and Gary Painter, an examination of the effect of non-traditional mortgages on homeownership in the US with Xudong An, Raphael Bostic and Susan Wachter and the development of housing affordability indicators incorporating location for the metropolitan region of Sao Paulo, Brazil with Richard Green. Prior to doing his Ph.D., Acolin was a Research Associate at the Penn Institute for Urban Research working on housing, urbanization and economic development issues. He obtained a master in Urban Policy from the London School of Economics and Sciences Po Paris and an undergraduate degree in Urban Studies from the University of Pennsylvania.

    Selected Publications

    Acolin, Arthur, and Domenic Vitiello. "Who owns Chinatown: Neighbourhood preservation and change in Boston and Philadelphia." Urban Studies (2017): 0042098017699366.

    Acolin, Arthur, Xudong An, Raphael W. Bostic, and Susan M. Wachter. "Homeownership and Nontraditional and Subprime Mortgages." Housing Policy Debate 27.3 (2017): 393-418.

    Acolin, Arthur, Raphael Bostic, and Gary Painter. "A field study of rental market discrimination across origins in France." Journal of Urban Economics 95 (2016): 49-63.

    Acolin, Arthur, Jesse Bricker, Paul Calem, and Susan Wachter. "Borrowing constraints and homeownership." The American Economic Review 106.5 (2016): 625-629.

    Acolin, Arthur, and Richard K. Green. "Measuring housing affordability in São Paulo metropolitan region: Incorporating location." Cities 62 (2017): 41-49.

    Penn IUR Scholar

    Frank S. Alexander

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    Sam Nunn Professor of Law, Emory University School of Law

    Areas of Interest

      About

      Frank Alexander is the Sam Nunn Professor of Law at the Emory University School of Law. His areas of expertise include property, real estate sales and finance, state and local government law, law and theology, federal housing policies, and homelessness. Alexander is the Director of the Project on Affordable Housing and Community Development, and Co-founder and Senior Advisor of the Center for Community Progress.  Alexander served as a Fellow of The Carter Center of Emory University (1993-1996), Commissioner of the State Housing Trust Fund for the Homeless (1994-1998), Interim Dean of Emory School of Law (2005-2006), and as Visiting Fellow at the Joint Center for Housing Studies, Harvard University (2007). He also has testified before Congress concerning the mortgage foreclosure crisis (2008). He is the author or editor of eight books and more than forty articles in real estate finance, community development, and law and theology.

      Selected Publications

      Alexander, Frank. 2013-2014. Georgia Real Estate Finance and Foreclosure Law (8th ed). Thomson Reuters.

      Alexander, Frank. 2011. Land Banks and Land Banking. Center for Community Progress.

      Alexander, Frank and Leslie A. Powell. 2011. Neighborhood Stabilization Strategies for Vacant and Abandoned Properties. Zoning & Planning Law Report, 34 (September).

      Alexander, Frank. 2009. Neighborhood Stabilization & Land Banking. Communities & Banking, 20(3). Boston: Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.

      Alexander, Frank. 2008. Land Banking As Metropolitan Policy. Washington, DC: Brookings Institution.

      Faculty Fellow

      David Bell

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      Xinmei Zhang and Yongge Dai Professor, Professor of Marketing

      About

      David Bell is Xinmei Zhang and Yongge Dai Professor and Professor of Marketing in the Marketing Department at The Wharton School. His current research focuses on the digital economy and success factors for Internet retail startups. Prior work in traditional retail settings explores unplanned and impulse buying, and consumer response to fixed and variable shopping costs. His articles have been published leading journals including Journal of Consumer Research, Journal of Marketing, Journal of Marketing Research, Management Science, and Marketing Science.

      Selected Publications

      Bell, David R., Santiago Gallino and Antonio Moreno. 2017 (forthcoming). “Revenge of the Store.” MIT Sloan Management Review. 

      Li, Kathleen and David Bell. 2017. “Estimation of average treatment effects with panel data: Asymptotic theory and implementation.” Journal of Econometrics 197: 65-75.

      Bell, David Bell. 2014. Location Is (Still) Everything: The Surprising Influence of the Real World on How We Search, Shop, and Sell in the Virtual One. Boston New Harvest, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt.

      Lee, Jae Young and David Bell. 2013. “Neighborhood Social Capital and Social Learning for Experience Attributes of Products.” Marketing Science 32(6): 960-976.

      Bell, David, JeongHye Choi, Leonard Lodish. 2012. “What Matters Most in Internet Retailing.” MIT Sloan Management Review 54: 27-33.

       

      Penn IUR Scholar

      Qin Bo

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      Associate Professor and Deputy Head, Department of Urban Planning and Management, Renmin University of China

      Areas of Interest

        About

        Dr. QIN Bo holds a Bachelor of Engineering from the Department of Architecture in Wuhan University, a Master of Science from the Department of Urban and Regional Planning in Peking University, and a Ph.D. degree in urban studies from the National University of Singapore. He joined the Department of Urban Planning and Management at Renmin University of China in 2008 and now serves as Associate Professor and Deputy Head. His research interests include urban spatial restructuring in Chinese cities, coordinated urban-rural planning and management, and urban sustainable development in China. He is the author/co-author of four books, e.g., The Location-choice of Firms and Urban Spatial Restructuring (2012), Low Carbon Spatial Planning and Sustainable Development (2014). He has also published numerous articles in both the international renowned journals such as JAPA, Urban Studies, and Chinese top journals in urban planning. He serves as reviewer for several leading academic journals and for the National Science Foundation of China. In his academic career Dr. QIN has taught courses in architecture and regional planning and has supervised several postgraduate students studying topics ranging from low carbon urban form to peri-urban development in Chinese cities.

        Selected Publications

        Han, S.S. & Qin, B. (2014) Low-carbon Spatial Planning and Sustainable Development: The Research on Households Carbon Emission in Beijing. Beijing: Renmin University Press.

        Qin, B. (2012) Location-choice of Firms and Urban Spatial Restructuring: A Case Study in Shanghai. Beijing: China Architecture and Building Press.

        Qin, B. and An, G.P. (2009) The application of Digital Management System in the Suburban. Beijing: Renmin University Press.

        Ye Y, LeGates R, and Qin B (2013) Coordinated Urban-rural Development Planning in China: The Chengdu Model. Journal of American Planning Association, 79(2): 125-137.

        Qin B and Han S S (2013) Emerging polycentricity in Beijing: evidence from housing price variations, 2001-05. Urban Studies 50(10): 2006-2023.

        Fellow

        Paul C. Brophy

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        Principal, Brophy & Reilly, LLC

        Senior Fellow, Metropolitan Policy Program, Brookings Institution

        Senior Fellow, Center for Community Progress, Senior Scholar, George Warren School of Social Work, Washington University in St. Louis

        Areas of Interest

          About

          Paul C. Brophy is a principal with Brophy & Reilly, LLC – a consulting firm specializing in economic development, housing and community development, and the management of complex urban redevelopment projects – and a Nonresident Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution, a Senior Advisor to the Center for Community Progress, and a Senior Scholar at the Brown School at Washington University in St. Louis. One of Brophy’s specialties is the improvement of older industrial cities and the neighborhoods within those cities. He is also Senior Advisor to Enterprise Community Partners. Prior to his forming Brophy & Reilly, LLC in 1993, Brophy was President and Co-CEO of the Enterprise Foundation and Executive Director of ACTION-Housing Inc., a nonprofit housing development and neighborhood enhancement organization located in Pittsburgh. He was Director of the first Department of Housing for the City of Pittsburgh, and the Executive Director of the City’s Urban Redevelopment Authority, responsible for downtown and neighborhood improvement.

          Selected Publications

          Brophy, Paul C. 2013. A Market-Oriented Approach to Neighborhoods. In Revitalizing American Cities, Susan M. Wachter and Kimberly Zeuli, eds. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.

          Brophy, Paul C., and Alice Shabecoff. 2001. A Guide to Careers in Community Development. Washington, DC: Island Press.

          Nenno, Mary K., Paul Brophy, Michael Barker. 1982. Housing and Local Government. Washington, DC: International City Management Association.

          Ahlbrandt, Roger S. and Paul C. Brophy. 1975. Neighborhood Revitalization: Theory and Practice. Boston: Lexington Books.

          Fellow

          James Cloar

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          Downtown Advisory Services

          Areas of Interest

            About

            Jim Cloar is an expert on downtown development and non-profit management structures. His recent projects include consulting for Wichita, KS, Tulsa, OK and Burlington VT on their downtown management structures. He is on the Board of Commissioners of the Tampa Housing Authority, the Board of Directors of the National Civic League and the Henry B. Plant Museum.  Cloar previously served as the President and CEO of the Partnership for Downtown St. Louis and chaired the City’s Downtown Economic Stimulus Authority. He also headed downtown associations in Dallas, TX and Tampa, FL. Cloar served nineteen years on the Board of Directors of the International Downtown Association (IDA) and is a former Chair of the organization. He has also been the President of the Urban Land Institute (ULI) and is a former Chair of ULI’s Public-Private Partnership Council. He is the recipient of several awards, including the St. Louis Mayor’s “Quality of Life” Award, and the Dan E. Sweat “Lifetime Achievement in Downtown Leadership” Award” from the IDA. 

            Selected Publications

            Cloar, James A. 1990. Centralized Retail Management: New Strategies for Downtown. Washington, DC: Urban Land Institute. 

            Affiliated PhD Student

            Anthony DeFusco

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            Doctoral Student in Applied Economics, University of Pennsylvania

            Areas of Interest

              About

              Anthony DeFusco is a Doctoral Student in Applied Economics at The Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. His research interests include public economics, urban economics, and real estate finance. DeFusco received his Bachelor of the Arts in Mathematics and Mathematical Economics from Temple University in 2009. Prior to graduate school, he spent some time as a research assistant at the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia.

              Selected Publications

              DeFusco, Anthony A., and Andrew D. Paciorek (2014). "The Interest Rate Elasticity of Mortgage Demand: Evidence from Bunching at the Conforming Loan Limit" Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2014-11. Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).

              DeFusco, Anthony, Wenjie Ding, Fernando Ferreira, and Joseph Gyourko (2013). “The Role of Contagion in the Last American Housing Cycle.” Wharton School, mimeo.

              Penn IUR Scholar

              Rebecca Diamond

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              Assistant Professor of Economics, Stanford Graduate School of Business

              About

              Rebecca Diamond is an Assistant Professor of Economics at the Stanford Graduate School of Business. She is an applied micro economist studying local labor and housing markets. Her recent research focuses on the causes and consequences of diverging economic growth across U.S. cities and its effects on inequality. She was a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research from 2013 to 2014. 

              Selected Publications

              Diamond, Rebecca, Thomas Barrios, Guido W. Imbens, and Michal Kolesár. 2012. Clustering, Spatial Correlations, and Randomization Inference. Journal of the American Statistical Association 107(498): 578-591.

              Diamond, Rebecca. 2013. The Determinants and Welfare Implications of U.S. Workers’ Diverging Location Choices by Skill: 1980-2000 (working paper).

              Diamond, Rebecca. 2014. Housing Supply Elasticity and Rent Extraction by State and Local Governments (working paper).

              Faculty Fellow

              Gilles Duranton

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              Dean's Chair in Real Estate Professor; Department Chair

              About

              Gilles Duranton is Professor of Real Estate in the Real Estate Department at The Wharton School. His research focuses on urban and regional development, transportation, and local public finance. Prior to joining the Real Estate Department in 2012, Duranton taught at the University of Toronto for seven years, and the London School of Economics for nine years. He is the co-editor of the Journal of Urban Economics, and is an editorial board member for several other journals. He is also affiliated with the Centre for Economic Policy Research in London, the Spatial Economics Research Centre at the London School of Economics, and the Rimini Centre for Economic Analysis. He currently serves as the Chair of the Real Estate department at The Wharton School.

              Selected Publications

              Duranton, Gilles. 2016. “Determinants of city growth in Colombia.” Papers in Regional Science 95(1): 101-132.

              Duranton, Gilles. 2016. “Agglomeration effects in Colombia.” Journal of Regional Science 56(2): 210-238.

              Duranton, Gilles. 2015. “Roads and Trade in Colombia.” Economics of Transportation 4(1): 16-36.

              Duranton, Gilles. 2015. “Growing through cities in developing countries.” World Bank Research Observer 30(1): 39-73.

              Faculty Fellow

              Fernando Ferreira

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              Associate Professor, Departments of Real Estate, and Business Economics and Public Policy

              About

              Fernando Ferreira is Associate Professor of Real Estate and Business Economics and Public Policy. His interests include public economics, urban economics, and real estate. He is also a Faculty Fellow and Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER), for which he co-edits the Journal of Public Economics. Ferreira has served as a visiting scholar at the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia and the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, and is the recipient of various research grants, including from the Ford Foundation and the U.S. Department of Education. 

              Selected Publications

              Ferreira, Fernando “What Drives Racial and Ethnic Differences in High Cost Mortgages? The Role of High Risk Lenders”, with Patrick Bayer and Stephen Ross. Forthcoming. Review of Financial Studies.

              Ferreira, Fernando, Patrick Bayer, and Stephen Ross. 2016. “The Vulnerability of Minority Homeowners in the Housing Boom and Bust.” American Economic Journal: Economic Policy 8(1).

              Ferreira, Fernando and Joseph Gyourko. 2014. “Does Gender Matter for Political Leadership? The Case of U.S. Mayors.” Journal of Public Economics 112: 24-39.

              Ferreira, Fernando, Leah Platt Boustan, Hernan Winkler, and Eric Zolt. 2013. “The Effect of Rising Income Inequality on Taxation and Public Expenditures: Evidence from U.S. Municipalities and School Districts, 1970-2000.” Review of Economics and Statistics 95(4): 1291-1302.

              Fellow

              David Gest

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              Associate, Ballard Spahr

              Areas of Interest

                About

                David Gest is a real estate attorney and Associate at Ballard Spahr. He has worked with city planners, architects, landscape architects, and environmental consultants on major real estate development projects. Gest has also worked with city agencies and community groups on zoning and historic preservation matters. Gest is a member of the American Planning Association and the American Bar Association. His focus areas include zoning and land use. 

                Penn IUR Scholar

                Richard K. Green

                x

                Director, University of Southern California Lusk Center for Real Estate; Lusk Chair in Real Estate

                Professor, USC Sol Price School of Public Policy and the Marshall School of Business, University of Southern California

                Areas of Interest

                  About

                  Richard K. Green is the Director of the University of Southern California (USC) Lusk Center for Real Estate. Green is also the Lusk Chair in Real Estate and Professor at both the USC Sol Price School of Public Policy and the Marshall School of Business. Before joining USC, Green was the Oliver T. Carr Jr., Chair of Real Estate Finance at the George Washington University School of Business. He also taught real estate finance and economics courses at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and was principal economist and director of financial strategy and policy analysis at Freddie Mac. More recently, Green was a Visiting Professor of Real Estate at the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School. Green’s areas of expertise include real estate, housing markets, real estate finance and economics, mortgage finance, land policy, urban policy, transportation, tax policy, and housing policy. He is a member of two academic journal editorial boards and a reviewer for several others. 

                  Selected Publications

                  Green, Richard K. 2011. Thoughts on Rental Housing Market and Policy. Cityscape, A Journal of Policy, Development and Research, 13(2).

                  Green, Richard K. and A. Reschovsky. 2011. “Using Tax Policy to Subsidize Homeownership.” In Public Spending and Incentives for Community Development Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, Aspen Institute, A. Staiger, ed.

                  Green, R., and Susan Wachter. 2008. The Housing Finance Revolution (Proceedings of the 31st Annual Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City Economic Symposium).

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