People

Penn IUR is affiliated with more than 200 experts in the field of urbanism. Its Faculty Fellows program identifies faculty at the University of Pennsylvania with a demonstrated interest in urban research; the Penn IUR Scholars program identifies urban scholars outside of Penn; and the Penn IUR Fellows program identifies expert urban practitioners. Together, these programs foster a community of scholars and encourage cross-disciplinary collaboration.

View by:
, ,
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
clear
Faculty Fellow

Mark Alan Hughes

x

Professor of Practice

Faculty Director, Kleinman Center for Energy Policy

About

Mark Alan Hughes is Professor of Practice in the School of Design and founding Faculty Director of Penn’s Kleinman Center for Energy Policy. He is also the founding Faculty Director of the Fels Policy Research Initiative in the School of Arts and Sciences, a Senior Fellow of the Wharton School’s Initiative for Global Environmental Leadership, and a Distinguished Scholar in Residence at Penn’s Fox Leadership Program. Hughes has published in the leading journals of economic geography, urban economics, political science, policy analysis, and won the National Planning Award for his research in city and regional planning. He was Chief Policy Adviser to Mayor Michael Nutter and the founding Director of Sustainability for the City of Philadelphia, where he led the creation of the city’s Greenworks Plan. He has designed and fielded national policy research projects in a variety of areas including the Bridges to Work program in transportation, the Transitional Work Corporation in job training and placement, the Campaign for Working Families in EITC participation, and the Energy Efficient Buildings Hub in regional economic development. 

 

Selected Publications

Hughes, Mark Alan, Cornelia Colijn, and Oscar Serpell. 2017. “Comparative Pathways to Regional Energy Transition.” Kleinman Policy Digest available at http://kleinmanenergy.upenn.edu/pathways.

Hughes, Mark Alan, Cornelia Colijn, and Oscar Serpell. 2017. “Managing Risk in the Energyshed.” LA+ Journal 6(Fall).

Hughes, Mark Ala. 2017. “No Acceptable Alternative to Paris.” The Philadelphia Inquirer, June 15. http://kleinmanenergy.upenn.edu/blog/2017/06/12/there-no-acceptable-alternative-paris.

 

Faculty Fellow

John Keene

x

Professor Emeritus of City and Regional Planning

About

John Keene is Professor Emeritus of City and Regional Planning in the Department of City and Regional Planning in the School of Design. His teaching and research interests focus on the legal aspects of city and regional planning, land development regulation, strategies for sustainable development, environmental planning and law, legal and policy issues relating to brownfield remediation, and management of urban growth. Keene has advised local governments on the legal aspects of environmental and farmland protection. Keene chaired the Department of City and Regional Planning from 1988 to 1992 and served two terms as Chair of the Graduate Group in City and Regional Planning. During 1999, 2000, and 2001, he served consecutively as Chair-Elect, Chair, and past Chair of the Faculty Senate of the University of Pennsylvania. He served as University Ombudsman from 1978-84 and 2006-09.

 

Selected Publications

Daniels, Thomas, and John C. Keene. 2018 (forthcoming). The Law of Agricultural Land Preservation. American Bar Association.

Keene, John. 2015. “Environmental Planning.” In The International Encyclopedia of the Social and Behavioral Sciences 7. Amsterdam: Elsevier.

Keene, John. 2006. “When Does Regulation Go Too Far? The Supreme Court’s Analytical Framework for Drawing the Line Between an Exercise of the Police Power and an Exercise of the Power of Eminent Domain.” Penn State Environmental Law Review 14.

Keene, John. et al. 1997. Saving American Farmland: What Works? American Farmland Trust Publications Division.

Coughlin, Robert E. and John C. Keene, senior authors and editors. 1981. The Protection of Farmland: A Reference Guidebook for State and Local Governments. National Agricultural Lands Study.

 

Emerging Scholar

Kirsten Kinzer

x

Assistant Professor, Department of Public and International Affairs, UNC Wilmington

About

Kirsten Kinzer is an assistant professor in the UNC Wilmington Department of Public and International Affairs. At UNCW she leads the urban planning concentration in the Master of Public Administration program. Kinzer’s research explores the role of public participation in planning implementation. Her current research project focuses on public engagement before and after the adoption of sustainability plans in American cities. Kinzer received her PhD in City and Regional Planning from PennDesign. She holds a Master in City Planning from MIT and a Bachelor of Architecture from Rice University. Kinzer previously worked as a city planner in Salem, Massachusetts, as an urban planning consultant in Portland, Oregon, and with several non-governmental organizations.

 

Selected Publications

Missed connections: a critical analysis of interconnections between public participation and plan implementation literature. (2016). Journal of Planning Literature. Published online before print.

 

Affiliated PhD Student

Jae Min Lee

x

Doctoral Candidate in City and Regional Planning, University of Pennsylvania

About

Jae Min Lee is doctoral student in City and Regional Planning at PennDesign. Trained as an urban designer in international and domestic contexts, Jae Min seeks to challenge the “placelessness” of modern urban design practice around the world. His research focuses on defining the healthy and sustainable urban form and helping architects and planners to design places that actively incorporates local and climatic contexts using urban simulations. Jae Min has worked on a range of city building projects as an urban design associate at both Chicago and New York offices at Skidmore, Owings, and Merrill LLP. He is a member of American Institute of Certified Planner and has also collaborated on several community projects with Open Lands, a Chicago-based land preservation organization.

 

Emerging Scholar

Theodore Lim

x

Global Environmental Data Scientist, Monsanto

About

Theodore Lim is Global Environmental Data Scientist at Monsanto. He received his PhD in City Planning focusing on urban stormwater management and green infrastructure implementation in 2017. He is particularly interested in the intersection between city-scale hydrological effectiveness of decentralized stormwater Best Management Practices, and the policy interventions and market mechanisms that best encourage diverse actors to adopt decentralized infrastructure. Prior to starting at Penn, Theo worked as a civil and environmental engineer in Beijing, New York City and San Francisco, specializing in integrated water resource management, ecological land use planning, and district-scale infrastructure solutions. His projects included the conceptual design of the water and wastewater management system for Google’s high profile Bay View campus development, the Langfang Smart Eco-City master plan, and engineered and ecological rehabilitation plans for sea-level rise in the San Francisco Bay and the Pearl River Delta. Theo’s previous research has also included immigrant community domestic violence survivor support services in Philadelphia, migrant workers and HIV/AIDS risk while on a US Fulbright Grant in northeast China, and ecotoxicity and persistent organic pollutant contaminant fate in the environment. While he is currently focusing on stormwater management, he hopes to utilize quantitative analysis to improve urban infrastructure planning and policy practices for a more sustainable urban world.

 

Emerging Scholar

Amy Lynch

x

Assistant Professor, Ohio University

About

Amy Lynch recently graduated from a doctoral program in City and Regional Planning at PennDesign and now is an Assistant Professor at Ohio University. Her research interests include ecosystem services, site-and-landscape scale green infrastructure planning, and sustainable urban development. Lynch studied the effect of land use and environmental planning practices on natural resources, and how these connections can be applied to assist sustainability efforts in less developed countries during her doctoral program. In 2011, Lynch received the C. Lowell Harriss Dissertation Fellowship from the Lincoln Institute of Land Policy, which funded her dissertation on the sustention of green infrastructure over time. Lynch is currently working with the Penn Institute for Urban Research and the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development to establish a core grouping of indicators to measure sustainable urban development at a municipal level. Lynch earned her Bachelor’s degree in Environmental Technology from North Carolina State University, and her Masters of Environmental Management at Duke University’s Nicholas School of the Environment and Earth Science and her PhD in City and Regional Planning at the University of Pennsylvania.

 

Selected Publications

Birch, Eugenie L. and Amy Lynch (2012). Measuring US Sustainable Urban Development. In Linda Starke (Ed.), State of the World 2012: Moving Toward Sustainable Prosperity. Washington, DC: Island Press

Lynch, Amy J., Stuart Andreason, Theodore Eisenman, John Robinson, Kenneth Steif and Eugenie L. Birch (2011). “Sustainable Development Indicators for the United States,” Penn IUR White Paper Series on Sustainable Urban Development, September.

 

Fellow

Rose Molokoane

x

Deputy President, Shack/Slum Dwellers International (SDI)

National Coordinator, South African Alliance and the Federation of the Urban Poor (FEDUP)

About

Rose Molokoane is a National Coordinator of the South African Alliance and the Federation of the Urban Poor (FEDUP), and Deputy President of Shack/Slum Dwellers International (SDI), a global network of slum dweller federations in 33 countries across the Global South. In addition, she serves as Chair of the World Urban Campaign and co-Chair of the Grassroots Constituency Group of the General Assembly of Partners. She is a resident and member of the Oukasie savings scheme in a slum settlement outside Pretoria, South Africa. A veteran of the anti-apartheid struggle, she is one of the most internationally recognized grassroots activists involved in land tenure and housing issues. FEDUP has helped more than 150,000 slum dwellers, the vast majority of whom are women, to pool their savings and improve their lives. This has won them sufficient standing to negotiate with government for a progressive housing policy that has already produced 15,000 new homes and secured more than 1,000 hectares of government land for development. Molokoane has initiated federations of savings schemes throughout Africa, Asia, and Latin America. She was awarded the UN-Habitat Scroll of Honor in 2005 for her struggle to bring land and homes to the poor.

 

Penn IUR Scholar

Dowell Myers

x

Professor of Policy, Planning, and Demography, Director of the Population Dynamics Research Group, University of Southern California

About

Dowell Myers is Professor in the Sol Price School of Public Policy at the University of Southern California and Director of the Population Dynamics Research Group. Myers’ areas of expertise are: immigration, demographic trends and census analysis, state and local population change, growth management and urban development, smart growth and sustainability, housing demand and real estate market demand. Myers has received a number of awards for his research and writings including: the 2009 Richard T. Ely Distinguished Educator Award from the Lambda Alpha International honorary society; the 2008 Best Article of the Year Award from the Journal of the American Planning Association; and the 2007 Thomas and Znaniecki Award for best book on international migration. 

 

Selected Publications

Myers, D. 2007. Immigrants and Boomers: Forging a New Social Contract for the Future of America. New York: Russell Sage Foundation.

Myers, D. and SungHo Ryu. 2008. Aging Baby Boomers and the Generational Housing Bubble: Foresight and Mitigation of an Epic Transition. Journal of the American Planning Association, 74(1): 17-33.

Myers, D. 2013. California’s Diminishing Resource: Children (Special Report). Lucile Packard Foundation for Children’s Health and USC Population Dynamics Research Group.

Myers, D. 2012. California Futures: New Narratives for a Changing Society. Boom: A Journal of California, 2: 37-54.

 

Faculty Fellow

Howard Neukrug

x

Professor of Practice

Former CEO of Philadelphia Water

Senior Fellow, US Water Alliance

About

Howard Neukrug P.E., is Professor of Practice in the Department of Earth and Environmental Science in the School of Arts and Sciences. Neukrug is the former Commissioner and CEO of Philadelphia Water, where he was responsible for all aspects of utility operations, environmental compliance, engineering, financing, budgeting, capital and strategic planning, customer service, human resources, and legal and policy decisions for its drinking water/wastewater/stormwater system serving 2.3 million people. At Penn, he is establishing a Water Center and teaching courses on the water industry and the role of water in urban sustainability and resiliency. He is also a Principal with CASE Environmental, LLC, where he provides consulting services to cities and utilities in urban planning, systems design, sustainability, organization development, strategic planning and trends and innovations in the global water industry. 

 

Selected Publications

Neukrug, Howard, Bill Diamond, L.D. McMullen, Eva Nieminski, Philip Singer, and R. Rhodes Trussell. 2000. “Roundtable: Deemphasizing contaminant-by-contaminant regulation.” Journal of the American Water Works Association 92(3).

Neukrug, Howard. 2000. “21st Century Treatment and Distribution.” Journal of the American Water Works Association 92(2): 54-55.

Neukrug, Howard M., Gary A Burlingame, William Wankoff, and Michael J Pickel. 1995. “Water-quality regs: Staying ahead.” Civil Engineering 65(1). 

 

Fellow

Michael A. Nutter

x

Former Mayor, City of Philadelphia

Areas of Interest

    About

    Michael A. Nutter served as the 98th mayor of Philadelphia—the nation’s fifth largest city—from January 2008 to January 2016, and as president of the U.S. Conference of Mayors from 2012 to 2013. During his time in office, he was widely recognized as a reformer, leading changes in policing, economic development, taxation, sustainability policy, and other areas. In 2014, Nutter was named as one of Governing magazine’s Public Officials of the Year; in 2011, Esquire magazine cited him among its Americans of the Year. During Nutter’s mayoralty, Philadelphia’s city government received more than 150 awards for innovative programs, good government practices, and general excellence. Before winning election as the city’s chief executive, Nutter served on the Philadelphia City Council for almost 15 years, from 1992 to 2006. He was also the chairman of the Pennsylvania Convention Center Authority Board from 2003 to 2007. He now serves as a distinguished faculty member at Columbia University’s School of International and Public Affairs (SIPA). 

     

    Faculty Fellow

    Saswati Sarkar

    x

    Professor

    About

    Saswati Sarkar is Professor in the Department of Electrical and Systems Engineering in the School of Engineering and Applied Science. Her research interests are in the science and economics of various classes of networks – for example, communication, social, transportation, power, and economic networks – with an emphasis on pricing and market economics, security, resource allocation, optimization and control of stochastic systems, distributed systems, and algorithms as well as sustainable development. She is currently serving as an Associate Editor of IEEE/ACM Transactions on Networking. She received the National Science Foundation (NSF) Faculty Early Career Development Award in 2003.

     

    Selected Publications

    Ghosh, Arnob, Saswati Sarkar, Randall Berry. 2017. “The Value of Side-Information in Secondary Spectrum Markets.” IEEE Journal on Selected Areas in Communications 35(1).

    Bera, Susanta, Moumita Pal, Saswati Sarkar, and Sunirmal Jana. 2017. “Hierarchically Structured Macro with Nested Mesoporous Zinc Indium Oxide Conducting Film.” ACS Applied Material Interfaces 9(5): 4420–4424.

    Lotfi, Mohammad Hassan, Karthikeyan Sundaresan, Saswati Sarkar, Mohammad Ali Khojastepour. 2017. “Economics of Quality Sponsored Data in Non-Neutral Networks.” IEEE/ACM Transactions on Networking 25(4).

    Khouzani, M. H. R., Saswati Sarkar, and Eitan Altman. 2012. “Optimal Dissemination of Security Patches in Mobile Wireless Networks.” IEEE Transactions on Information Theory 58(7): 4714-4732.

     

    Penn IUR Scholar

    Catherine Tumber

    x

    Visiting Scholar, School of Public Policy and Urban Affairs, Northeastern University

    Fellow of the Massachusetts Institute for a New Commonwealth’s Gateway Cities Innovation Institute

    Areas of Interest

      About

      Catherine Tumber is Visiting Scholar at Northeastern University’s School of Public Policy and Urban Affairs and a Fellow of the Massachusetts Institute for a New Commonwealth’s Gateway Cities Innovation Institute. A historian and journalist, Tumber previously worked as a research affiliate in the MIT School of Architecture and Planning’s Community Innovators Lab, where she wrote her acclaimed book Small, Gritty and Green. Her areas of expertise include low-carbon economic development, metropolitan land use and governance, sustainable urbanism, and US social and cultural history. She has also worked as an editor for the Boston Phoenix and the Boston Review, and written for both publications as well as for many others.

       

      Selected Publications

      Tumber, Catherine. 2014. “Fields, Factories, and Workshops: Green Economic Development on the Smaller-Metro Scale.” In Revitalizing American Cities, Susan Wachter and Kimberly Zeuli, eds. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.

      Tumber, Catherine, co-author with Benjamin Forman. 2013 Reinventing Transit: A Blueprint for Investing in Regional Transportation Authorities for Strong Gateway City Economies (MassINC Gateway Cities Innovation Institute concept paper, March 2013).

      Tumber, Catherine. 2013. The Medium Apples (review of Ben Adler’s review of Alan Ehrenhalt, The Great Inversion and the Future of the American City). Democracy: A Journal of Ideas, 27 (Winter): 80-86.

      Tumber, Catherine. 2012. Small, Gritty and Green: The Promise of America’s Smaller Industrial Cities in a Low-Carbon World. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

      Tumber, Catherine. 2012. Econ-Geo (review of Enrico Moretti, The New Geography of Jobs). Nation (December 17): 43-46.

       

      Bring our latest initiatives, publications and events to your inbox.