People

Penn IUR is affiliated with more than 200 experts in the field of urbanism. Its Faculty Fellows program identifies faculty at the University of Pennsylvania with a demonstrated interest in urban research; the Penn IUR Scholars program identifies urban scholars outside of Penn; and the Penn IUR Fellows program identifies expert urban practitioners. Together, these programs foster a community of scholars and encourage cross-disciplinary collaboration.

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Emerging Scholar

Caroline Cheong

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Assistant Professor, Department of History, University of Central Florida

About

Caroline Cheong is an assistant professor in the History Department at the University of Central Florida. Her research focuses on the relationship between urban heritage conservation and economic development, values-based conservation management, conservation economics and poverty reduction. She earned her PhD from the University of Pennsylvania in City and Regional Planning, her MS in Historic Preservation from the University of Pennsylvania and her BS in Anthropology from the University of Chicago. She was a US/ICOMOS International Exchange Intern in Al Houson, Jordan and a Graduate Intern at the Getty Conservation Institute where she evaluated the challenges and opportunities facing historic cities.  Previously, Caroline was the Director of Research for Heritage Strategies International and PlaceEconomics through which she published numerous research reports and professional publications focusing on the economic impacts of historic preservation with Donovan Rypkema.

 

Selected Publications

Macdonald, Susan and Caroline Cheong. The Role of Public-Private Partnerships in Conserving Heritage Buildings, Sites and Historic Urban Areas: A Literature Review. Los Angeles, CA: Getty Publications, 2014

Cheong, Caroline. Instruments for urban regeneration: Mixed-capital companies. (2014). Manuscript submitted for publication. Prepared for Eduardo Rojas.

Cheong, Caroline. Creative Cities and Place. (2013). Manuscript submitted for publication. Prepared for Donovan Rypkema, Erasmus University and the Ministry of Education, Culture and Science of the Netherlands.

Cheong, Caroline. Cruise Ship Tourism: Issues and Trends. Prepared for the World Monuments Fund for “Harboring Tourism: A Symposium on Cruise Ships in Historic Port Communities,” 2012.

 

Emerging Scholar

Ben Chrisinger

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Pos-Doctoral Research Fellow, School of Medicine, Stanford University

About

Ben Chrisinger is a postdoctoral research fellow with Stanford University’s School of Medicine.  He is committed to research that helps explain relationships between the built environment and health, especially health disparities.  His dissertation research examined efforts to open new supermarkets in underserved areas (“food deserts”) by considering development processes, store-level outcomes, and community and customer experiences. With his former advisor, Dr. Amy Hillier, Ben is helping analyze interactions between the food environment and healthy purchasing within the federal Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), and has also written about the role of SNAP in community development.

Ben completed his Ph.D. in City and Regional Planning at the University of Pennsylvania in 2015.  He is a former fellow with the Emerging Leaders in Science and Society (ELISS) Program at the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and Graduate Research Fellow with the National Science Foundation.  He received his undergraduate and graduate degrees in Urban and Environmental Planning from the University of Virginia.  

 

Selected Publications

Chrisinger, B. (2015). Reconsidering the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program as Community Development. Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, 47(3): 273-277. DOI:10.1016/j.jneb.2014.10.005. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25467214.

Chrisinger, B. Changing food stamp distribution to attract new grocers. The Baltimore Sun. 22 July 2015. http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/opinion/oped/bs-ed-food-desert-20150722-story.html

Brinkley, C., Chrisinger, B., and A. Hillier (2013). Tradition of Healthy Food Access in Low-Income Neighborhoods: Price and Variety of Curbside Produce Vending Compared to Conventional Retailers. Journal of Agriculture, Food Systems, and Community Development, 4(1):155-169. http://dx.doi.org/10.5304/jafscd.2013.041.011. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4274600/.

Chrisinger, B. “Food Stamps and Place: New Cuts Could Dry Up Food Desert Improvements.” Planetizen. December 2013. http://www.planetizen.com/node/66580

Chrisinger, B., & S. Golden (forthcoming). Urban Agriculture & Health: What Is Known, What Is Possible. In, Morales, A., and Dawson, J. (Eds.) Cities of Farmers: Problems, Possibilities, and Processes of Producing Food in Cities. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press. (forthcoming).

Chrisinger, B. “Planner on Wheels: Perspectives on Affordable Housing in America, by Bicycle.” American Planning Association’s Planning Magazine. November 2012. https://www.planning.org/planning/2012/nov/planneronwheels.htm

 

Faculty Fellow

Thomas Daniels

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Professor; Director of Land Use and Environmental Planning Concentration

About

Tom Daniels is Professor of City and Regional Planning and Director of the Land Use and Environmental Planning Concentration in the Department of City and Regional Planning in the School of Design. His main areas of interest are farmland preservation, growth management, and the connection between land use and water quality. Daniels often serves as a consultant to state and local governments and land trusts. He lives in Lancaster, Pennsylvania where for nine years he managed the county’s nationally recognized farmland preservation program. Daniels’ has taught at SUNY-Albany, Kansas State University, and Iowa State University and has served on the Editorial Advisory Board of the Journal of the American Planning Association. In 2002 he was a Senior Fulbright Scholar at the University of New South Wales in Sydney, Australia.

 

Selected Publications

Daniels, Thomas. 2014. The Environmental Planning Handbook, 2nd edition. APA Planners Press, 2014.

Daniels, Thomas and Doug Walker. 2011. The Planners Guide to CommunityViz. APA Planners Press.

Daniels, Tom. 2010. “Integrating Forest Carbon Sequestration Into a Cap-and-Trade Program to Reduce Net CO2 Emissions.” Journal of the American Planning Association 76(4).

Daniels, Tom. 2009. “A Trail Across Time: American Environmental Planning from City Beautiful to Sustainability.” Journal of the American Planning Association 75(2).

Daniels, Tom. 1999. When City and Country Collide: Managing Growth in the Metropolitan Fringe. Washington, DC: Island Press.

 

Affiliated PhD Student

Eliza Davenport Whiteman

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Doctoral Candidate, City and Regional Planning, University of Pennsylvania

About

Eliza is a PhD Student in the City & Regional Planning program at PennDesign. Her research interests focus on issues of food access and food insecurity in urban environments. She uses a mixed-methods approach to explore spatiotemporal dynamics of food and health across the urban planning, public health and social welfare disciplines. She received an MS in Nutrition Policy and an MA in Urban & Environmental Planning from Tufts University and a BA in Sustainable Agriculture from The Evergreen State College. Prior to her doctoral studies, she worked on city food policy issues at the Baltimore Food Policy Initiative, and in Portland, Oregon, where she served on the Portland-Multnomah Food Policy Council and worked at a non-profit food education organization. 

 

Selected Publications

Johnson, M. P., Hollander, J. B., & Whiteman, E. D. (2015). Data and Analytics for Neighborhood Development: Smart Shrinkage Decision Modeling in Baltimore, Maryland. In Planning Support Systems and Smart Cities (pp. 61–76). Springer International Publishing.

Auerbach, A., McCabe, K., & Whiteman, E. D. (2014). A Health Impact Assessment of the Massachusetts Domestic Workers’ Bill of Rights. Health Resources in Action. 

 

Penn IUR Scholar

Margaret Dewar

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Professor of Urban and Regional Planning, Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning, University of Michigan

About

Margaret Dewar is Professor of Urban and Regional Planning in the Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning at the University of Michigan. Her research is in economic development, urban environmental planning, and urban land use. Her current projects address what cities become following extensive abandonment, what institutions and relationships make a difference in what such cities become, and how planners can improve their practice in these cities. Her projects deal with how planners can address issues facing troubled industries, cities with high rates of poverty, and low-income neighborhoods. Dewar teaches courses where students studying for the Master of Urban Planning work with community partners, principally in Detroit and Flint, to produce plans that advance the agendas of those partners. She serves as Faculty Director for the Graduate Certificate in Real Estate Development.

 

Selected Publications

Dewar, Margaret and Robert Linn. 2015. “Remaking Brightmoor.” In Mapping Detroit, June Manning Thomas and Henco Bekkering, eds. Detroit: Wayne State University Press.

Dewar, Margaret. 2013. Paying Employers to Hire Local Workers in Distressed Places. Economic Development Quarterly, 27 (November): 284-300.

Dewar, Margaret, and June Manning Thomas, eds. 2013. The City After Abandonment. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.

Dewar, Margaret and Matthew Weber. 2012. “City Abandonment.” In Oxford Handbook of Urban Planning, 563-586, Rachel Weber and Randall Crane, eds. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Morrison, Hunter and Margaret Dewar. 2012. “Planning in America’s Legacy Cities: Toward Better, Smaller Communities after Decline.” In Rebuilding America’s Legacy Cities: New Directions for the Industrial Heartland, 115-137, Alan Mallach, ed. New York: American Assembly.

Dewar, Margaret. 2006. Selling Tax-Reverted Land: Lessons from Cleveland and Detroit. Journal of the American Planning Association, 72(2): 167-180.

 

Penn IUR Scholar

Zaire Zenit Dinzey-Flores

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Associate Professor, Latino and Hispanic Caribbean Studies and Sociology, Rutgers University

About

Zaire Z. Dinzey-Flores is Associate Professor of Sociology and Latino and Hispanic Caribbean Studies at Rutgers University. She was previously the Andrew W. Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow on Race, Crime, and Justice at the Vera Institute of Justice in New York City. Dinzey-Flores has a number of research interests including urban and community sociology, urban planning, race and ethnicity, space and place, qualitative and quantitative methods, social policy, and Latin America and Caribbean Studies. Dinzey-Flores has published articles on public housing policy and design in Puerto Rico, race and class segregation and inequality in Puerto Rico, reggaetón music and culture as an urban phenomenon, and what it means to acknowledge Latinos in the urban intellectual history of the United States. Her recent book, Locked In, Locked Out: Gated Communities in a Puerto Rican City (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2013) looks at questions of race and class inequality as they are recreated and contained in the physical built environment.

 

Selected Publications

Dinzey-Flores, Zaire Zenit. 2013. Locked In, Locked Out. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.

 

Affiliated PhD Student

Xiaoxia Dong

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PhD Candidate, City and Regional Planning, University of Pennslyvania

About

Xiaoxia Dong is a doctoral student in the Department of City and Regional Planning at PennDesign. His research interest lies in transportation and infrastructure planning. In particular, he is eager to explore how the potential of new transportation technologies and services such as driverless cars and ride-hailing can be maximized to create accessible and sustainable urban environment. Having witnessed the success and failure of many of these emerging technologies and services in China, he also hopes to incorporate an international perspective into his research. His goal is to enable policy makers to make informed decisions when facilitating urban development with respect to new transportation technologies and services. Xiaoxia has a BA degree in Urban Planning from the University of Utah and a Master of City Planning degree from the University of Pennsylvania. He worked as a transportation planner at Fehr and Peers where he participated in multimodal planning, traffic impact studies, master planning, and statistical analyses. He also interned at the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) in Beijing after college where he learned the current sustainability related policies and practices in China.

 

Selected Publications

Dong, Xiaoxia. 2014 “A High Speed Future.” Panorama. University of Pennsylvania, School of Design.

Dong, Xiaoxia. 2011 “Wisdom of the Businessmen of Chicago” (In Chinese). Peking University Business Review. Peking University.

 

Affiliated PhD Student

Chandan Deuskar

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PhD Candidate, City and Regional Planning, University of Pennslyvania

About

Chandan Deuskar is a doctoral student in city and regional planning at the University of Pennsylvania School of Design. His research interests relate to rapid urbanization in the developing world and its relationship with urban poverty and economic growth, the spatial form of cities, and urban land issues. Between 2011 and 2016, he worked at the World Bank on urban development in Indonesia, Vietnam, Mongolia, Malaysia, Haiti, and Palestine, as well as regional and global studies which used new data and methods to standardize the definition and measurement of urban areas to allow international comparison of urbanization and its impacts. In 2011, Chandan obtained a Masters in City Planning from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where his thesis was on land readjustment as a means of acquiring land for urban expansion in Ahmedabad, India. He also holds a BA in architecture from Columbia University. He grew up in Mumbai, India, and has also lived in Dubai, New York, Boston, and Washington, DC. 

 

Selected Publications

World Bank. “East Asia’s Changing Urban Landscape: Measuring a Decade of Spatial Growth.” (2015).

Sanyal, Bishwapriya, and Chandan Deuskar. “A better way to grow? Town planning schemes as a hybrid land readjustment process in Ahmedabad, India.” Value capture and land policies 149 (2012): 182.

 

Emerging Scholar

Meagan Ehlenz

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Assistant Professor, School of Geography and Urban Planning, Arizona State University

About

Meagan Ehlenz is an assistant professor at Arizona State University’s School of Geography and Urban Planning. Her major fields of study include urban revitalization and community development, with specializations in the role of anchor institutions in urban places and mechanisms for building community wealth. Prior to joining ASU’s faculty, Ehlenz was a Research Associate at the Penn Institute for Urban Research. In this capacity, she developed a set of case studies for Penn IUR’s Anchor Institution Roundtable (PRAI), The Power of Eds & Meds: Urban Universities Investing in Neighborhood Revitalization and Innovation. She was also a Lincoln Institute of Land Policy C. Lowell Harriss dissertation fellow. Previously, Ehlenz worked as a planning consultant in Southeastern Wisconsin and as a senior planner for the City of Milwaukee’s Department of City Development. She holds a PhD in City and Regional Planning from the Department of City and Regional Planning at the University of Pennsylvania, a Master in Urban Planning from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, and a Bachelor in Environmental Design from the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay.

 

Selected Publications

Ehlenz, Meagan M. “Neighborhood Revitalization and the Anchor Institution: Assessing the Impact of the University of Pennsylvania’s West Philadelphia Initiatives on University City.” Urban Affairs Review (forthcoming).

Ehlenz, Meagan M. and Eugénie L. Birch with Brian Agness.  The Power of Eds and Meds: Urban Universities Investing in Neighborhood Revitalization & Innovation. Philadelphia: Penn Institute for Urban Research, 2014.

Ehlenz, Meagan M. “Managing the Land Access Paradox in the Urbanising World.” Critical Housing Analysis 1, no. 1 (2014). 

Ehlenz, Meagan M. Community Land Trusts and Limited Equity Cooperatives: A Marriage of Affordable Homeownership Models? Working Paper. Cambridge, MA: Lincoln Institute of Land Policy, 2014.

Ehlenz, Meagan M. Review of New Deal Ruins: Race, Economic Justice, and Public Housing Policy by Edward G. Goetz (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 2013). Journal of Urban Affairs 36, no. 3 (2014): 540-541.

 

Emerging Scholar

Theodore Eisenman

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Assistant Professor of Landscape Architecture, University of Massachusetts Amherst

About

Theodore Eisenman, Ph.D., MLA, is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Landscape Architecture and Regional Planning at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. He was previously an Andrew W. Mellon Fellow in the Humanities Institute at the New York Botanical Garden, and his principal scholarly interest concerns the historical, scientific, cultural, and design bases of urban greening – defined here as the introduction or conservation of outdoor vegetation in cities. Theodore’s career spans research and practice with a range of federal, municipal, and nonprofit organizations. He has been a regular contributor to Landscape Architecture Magazine on ecological design topics and is currently a review editor for the urban ecology section of Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution. Raised in Sweden and the United States, and having worked as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Senegal, he is also interested in international affairs.

 

Selected Publications

Eisenman, T. S. (2016). Greening Cities in an Urbanizing Age: The Human Health Bases in the 19th and Early 21st Centuries. Change Over Time, In Press.

Eisenman, T. S. (2016) [Review of The Ecological Design and Planning Reader, by F. O. Ndubisi]. Journal of Planning Education and Research, OnlineFirst.

Eisenman, T. S. (2013). Frederick Law Olmsted, Green Infrastructure, and the Evolving City. Journal of Planning History, 12(4), 287–311.

Eisenman, T. S. (2013). [Review of Greening Berlin: The Co-production of Science, Politics, and Urban Nature, by J. Lachmund]. Journal of Planning Literature, 28(3), 258–259.

Eisenman, T. S. Anzevino, J., Rosenberg, S., & Spector, S. (Eds.). (2010). Revitalizing Hudson Riverfronts: Illustrated Conservation & Development Strategies for Creating Healthy, Prosperous Communities. Poughkeepsie, NY: Scenic Hudson.

 

Fellow

Brian English

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Director, Office of Program Innovation, Global Communities (formerly CHF International)

About

Brian English is an urban planner that works at the intersections of sustainability, technology and economics.

Brian is the Director of Program Innovation for Global Communities (formerly CHF International), an international development organization in Washington DC. For the past 10 years, Brian has managed inter-disciplinary teams on urban development projects in Asia, Africa, the Middle East, and the Caribbean. From 2009-2011, Brian was Country Director for CHF International in India and directed a $6 million program called SCALE-UP funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation to reduce urban poverty. After Hurricane Ivan in 2004, Brian managed community revitalization programs in the Eastern Caribbean for the Unites States Agency for International Development. Brian has consulted on a broad range of development projects including special economic zones, innovations clusters, and city master plans.

Brian’s work has been featured in New York Times, Scientific American, Business Week and Harvard Business Review. Brian was an Aspen Scholar at the 2012 Aspen Ideas Festival and presented at a TEDx on Forces of Change in June, 2012. In 2014, Brian was selected as a Resident Fellow by Rockefeller Foundation at their Bellagio Center in Italy.

 

Penn IUR Scholar

Billy Fleming

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Post-Doctoral Fellow, Ian L. McHarg Center, University of Pennsylvania

About

Billy is a post-doctoral fellow at the Ian L. McHarg Center with a background in urban design and policy development. He graduated with a PhD in City and Regional Planning from the University of Pennsylvania and Bachelor of Landscape Architecture from the University of Arkansas where also served as the Student Government President during his final year – the first design student to do so in the University’s 140-year history. Upon graduation, he was presented with the Senior Citation Award, which honors the top undergraduate man and woman across the entire campus. Billy then practiced as a landscape architect in the Middle East, specializing in the development of afforestation strategies in water-scarce environments before returning to graduate school at the University of Texas. While there, he served as a research assistant to Dean Fritz Steiner and was presented with the award for the top master’s thesis within the UT School of Architecture. After graduation, Billy worked in the White House Domestic Policy Council during the first term of President Obama’s Administration and his portfolio included the Sustainable Communities Initiative and the America’s Great Outdoors Initiative (National Parks Service). His dissertation work is focused on the nature of climate change adaptation in coastal cities and it is informed greatly by his work and academic experience.

 

Selected Publications

B. Fleming. 2015. Towards a Megaregional Future: Analysing Progress, Assessing Priorities in the US Megaregion Project. In J. Harrison and M. Hoyler (Eds.), Megaregions: Globalization’s New Urban Form?, (pp. 200-229). London: Edward Elgar Publishing.

B. Fleming. 2015. “Can We Rebuild by Design?“LA+, 1(1): 104-111.

B. Fleming. 2015. “Book Review: Crisis Cities: Disaster and Redevelopment in New York and New Orleans.” Journal of the American Planning Association, 84(2): 158-159.

B. Fleming. 2015 (in-press). “Double-Book Review: The Resilience Dividend: Being Strong in a World Where Things Go Wrong & The Social Roots of Risk: Producing Disasters, Promoting Resilience.” Journal of the American Planning Association, 84(4).

B. Fleming 2016 (in-press). “Lost in Translation: The Authorship Structure and Argumentation of Resilience.” Landscape Journal, 35(1).

 

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