People

Penn IUR is affiliated with more than 200 experts in the field of urbanism. Its Faculty Fellows program identifies faculty at the University of Pennsylvania with a demonstrated interest in urban research; the Penn IUR Scholars program identifies urban scholars outside of Penn; and the Penn IUR Fellows program identifies expert urban practitioners. Together, these programs foster a community of scholars and encourage cross-disciplinary collaboration.

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Penn IUR Scholar

George Galster

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Clarence Hilberry Professor of Urban Affairs, Department of Urban Studies Planning, Wayne State University

About

George Galster is the Clarence Hilberry Professor of Urban Affairs at the Department of Urban Studies and Planning at Wayne State University. Galster has been a consultant to the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, U.S. Department of Justice, numerous municipalities, community organizations, and civil rights groups.  He has provided housing policy consultations to governments in Australia, China, France, Scotland and the United States. Galster’s areas of interest are metropolitan housing markets, racial discrimination and segregation, neighborhood dynamics, residential reinvestment, community lending and insurance patterns, and the interrelationship between neighborhood contexts and social inequality. He has published more than 130 peer-reviewed articles on a variety of urban issues. 

 

Selected Publications

Raleigh, Erica and George Galster. Forthcoming. Neighborhood Deterioration, Abandonment and Crime Dynamics. Journal of Urban Affairs.

Hedman, Lina and George Galster. 2013. Neighborhood Income Sorting and the Effects of Neighborhood Income Mix on Income: A Holistic Empirical Exploration. Urban Studies, 50(1): 107-127.

Galster, George. 2012. Driving Detroit: The Quest for Respect in the Motor City. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.

Price, Gwylim, Yu Chen, and George Galster. 2011. The Impact of Floods on House Prices: An Imperfect Information Approach with Myopia and Amnesia. Housing Studies 26(2): 259-279.

Galster, George. 2008. Quantifying the Effect of Neighborhood on Individuals: Challenges, Alternative Approaches, and Promising Directions. Schmollers Jahrbuch, 128: 1-42.

Galster, George, Peter Tatian, and John Accordino. 2006. Targeting Investments for Neighborhood Revitalization. Journal of the American Planning Association, 72(4): 457-474.

 

Affiliated PhD Student

Samuel Geldin

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PhD Candidate, City and Regional Planning, School of Design, University of Pennsylvania

About

Sam Geldin is a doctoral student in the Department of City and Regional Planning with interests in climate adaptation, disaster risk reduction, and urban governance in the Global South. He is particularly passionate about enhancing subnational climate action efforts through policy, planning, and comparative urban studies. Sam previously supported two transnational climate action networks, policy formulation in the California Governor’s Office of Planning, and a research initiative facilitated by the UNFCCC Secretariat. He holds an MSc in Environmental Science from Yale, where his master’s thesis investigated the diffusion of adaptation practices through city networks in Indonesia. He also holds a BS in Environmental Science and a BA in Geography from UCLA.

 

Fellow

Alan Greenberger

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Executive Director, Philadelphia City Planning Commission

Mayor for Planning and Economic Development and Director of Commerce, City of Philadelphia

About

Alan Greenberger is the Executive Director of the Philadelphia City Planning Commission and Deputy Mayor for Planning and Economic Development and Director of Commerce for Philadelphia. Prior to his position as Deputy Mayor, Greenberger worked for several years with Mitchell/Giurgola Architects, practicing as a partner through 2008. In 2009, he became the Executive Director of the Philadelphia Zoning Code Commission. Greenberger currently serves on the faculty of the Department of Architecture at Drexel University and the Department of City and Regional Planning at the University of Pennsylvania. Among Greenberger’s notable projects are the renovation of Lehigh University’s Lindeman Library, the Mann Center for the Performing Arts, the America on Wheels Museum in Allentown, and the Master Plan for the Centennial District in Fairmount Park. 

 

Faculty Fellow

Erick Guerra

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Assistant Professor

About

Erick Guerra is Assistant Professor in City and Regional Planning in the School of Design, where he teaches courses in transportation planning and quantitative planning methods. His research focuses on the relationship between land use, transportation systems, and travel behavior with an emphasis on rapidly motorizing cities, public health outcomes, and transportation technologies. He has published recent articles on land use and transportation in Mexico and Indonesia, public transport policy, land use and traffic safety, and contemporary planning for self-driving vehicles.

As a practicing researcher and consultant, Guerra has ongoing or recently completed projects on accessibility and transportation affordability for the Brookings Institution, the World Bank, the OECD, and the Lincoln Institute of Land Policy. He holds a Ph.D. in City and Regional Planning from the University of California Berkeley, a Master’s in Urban Planning from Harvard University, and a BA in Fine Arts and French from the University of Pennsylvania. He served as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Gabon from 2002 to 2004.

 

Selected Publications

Dong, Xiaoxia, Matt DiScenna, and Erick Guerra. 2017. “Transit User Perception of Driverless Buses.” Transportation May: 1–16.

Landis, John, Erick Guerra, and David Hsu. 2017. “Intersecting National Climate Change Policy with Local Development Trends, Travel Patterns, and Building Forms.” Journal of Planning Education and Research.

Guerra, Erick and Adam Millard-Ball. 2017. “Getting around a license-plate ban: Behavioral responses to Mexico City’s driving restriction.” Transportation Research Part D: Transport and Environment 55: 113-126.

Guerra, Erick. 2017. “Electric vehicles, air pollution, and the motorcycle city: A stated preference survey of consumers’ willingness to adopt electric motorcycles in Solo, Indonesia.” Transportation Research Part D: Transport and Environment. 

Guerra, Erick. 2017. “Does Where You Live Affect How Much You Spend on Transit? The Link between Urban Form and Household Transit Expenditures in Mexico City.” The Journal of Transport and Land Use 10(1): 1–24.

 

Faculty Fellow

Joseph Gyourko

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Martin Bucksbaum Professor of Real Estate, Finance, and Business and Public Policy

Nancy Nasher and David Haemiseggar Director, Zell/Lurie Real Estate Center

About

Joe Gyourko is the Martin Bucksbaum Professor of Real Estate, Finance and Business & Public Policy at The Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. He also serves as the Nancy Nasher and David Haemiseggar Director of the Zell/Lurie Real Estate Center at Wharton. Professor Gyourko’s research interests include real estate finance and investments, urban economics, and housing markets, in the United States and China. He is a Research Associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) and served as Co-Director of the special NBER Project on Housing Markets and the Financial Crisis. Professor Gyourko served as co-editor of the Journal of Urban Economics, is a past Trustee of the Urban Land Institute (ULI) and Director of the Pension Real Estate Association (PREA), and consults to various private firms on real estate investment and policy matters. He received his B.A. from Duke University and a Ph.D. in Economics from the University of Chicago.

 

Selected Publications

Gyourko, Joseph and Edward Glaeser. Forthcoming. “The Economics of Housing Supply.” Journal of Economic Perspectives.

Wu, Jing, Joseph Gyourko, and Yongheng Deng. 2016. “Evaluating the Risk of Chinese Housing Markets: What We Know and What We Need to Know.” China Economic Review 39: 91-114.

Gyourko, Joseph and Raven Molloy. 2015. “Regulation and Housing Supply.” In Handbook of Regional and Urban Economics Vol 5A, edited by Gilles Duranton, J. Vernon Henderson, and William Strange. Amsterdam, The Netherlands: Elsevier.

Gyourko, Joseph, Chris Mayer, and Todd Sinai. 2013. “Superstar Cities.” American Economic Journal-Economic Policy 5(4): 167-199.

 

Emerging Scholar

Albert T. Han

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Faculty of Environmental Design, University of Calgary

About

Albert Tonghoon Han is currently a postdoctoral research fellow with the University of Calgary’s Faculty of Environmental Design. His research focuses on studying how growth management, land use planning, and environmental policies affect the natural environment in metropolitan areas in the North America and other fast-growing cities around the world. He is also interested in studying how planning efforts based on market-based approaches can mitigate the impacts of climate change, particularly in regards to improving building energy efficiency in cities. Albert received his Ph.D. in City and Regional Planning from University of Pennsylvania in 2015. Prior to Penn, he worked on various global environmental projects at the Korea Environment Institute from 2011 to 2012. He obtained his master’s degree in Urban and Regional Planning from the University of Iowa in 2011 with specialization in environmental planning and spatial analysis. His devotion to studying land use and environmental planning originated from his background in Life Science and Biotechnology from Korea University where he received his bachelor’s degree in 2009.

 

Affiliated PhD Student

Sa Min Han

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Doctoral Student, City and Regional Planning, University of Pennslyvania

About

Sa Min Han is a doctoral student in the Department of City and Regional Planning at the University of Pennsylvania. She has a BA degree in Landscape Architecture from the Seoul National University and a Master of Landscape Architecture degree from the University of Pennsylvania. Prior to her arrival, she worked as a certificated landscape architect and urban planner at Samsung C&T in Korea for 8 years. She also interned at AECOM in Hong Kong. Ms. Han’s research interest lies in resilient and sustainable planning. She eagerly hopes to study mapping process related to vulnerability indexes and regional assessment, for use when engaging in site prioritization and preparations for natural hazards caused by climate change. Her goal is to support policymakers, planners, and urban designers hoping to better understand how coastal cities should respond to natural hazards caused by climate change and to help them to establish appropriate policies for mitigation and adaptation.

 

Selected Publications

Korea Water Resources Corporation. “Application and Management Plans for the Flood Control Plains in Korea” (2007)

PennDesign Urban Planning Studio. “Alternative Futures for the New Jersey Shore: Climate Change Adaptation & Natural Hazard Mitigation Strategies”, IFLA World Congress (2014)

11st ULI / Gerald D. Hines Student Urban Design Competition, honorable mention (2013)

 

Faculty Fellow

Amy Hillier

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Associate Professor

About

Amy Hillier is Associate Professor in the Department of City and Regional Planning in the School of Design, with a secondary faculty appointment in the School of Social Policy & Practice. She teaches courses relating to GIS, built environment and public health, and community development in city planning, urban studies, public health, and social work. Her research focuses on issues of geographic disparities and access to services and resources in disadvantaged communities and has included GIS applications in redlining and housing discrimination, affordable housing, and public health. Her dissertation, funded by the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), considered the impact of the Home Owner’s Loan Corporation on lending in Philadelphia. With her focus on public health and the built environment, she frequently collaborates with colleagues at the Perelman School of Medicine and at The Food Trust.

 

Selected Publications

Hillier, Amy and Benjamin Chrisinger. 2017. “The Reality of Urban Food Deserts and What Low-Income Food Shoppers Need.” In Social Policy and Social Justice, edited by John L Jackson, Jr. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.

Lapham, Sandra C, Deborah A Cohen, Bing Han, Stephanie Williamson, Kelly R Evenson, Thomas L McKenzie, Amy Hillier, and Phillip Ward. 2016. “How important is perception of safety to park use? A four-city survey.” Urban Studies 53(12).

Cannuscio, CC, A Hillier, A Karpyn, and K Glanz. 2014. “The social dynamics of healthy food shopping and store choice in an urban environment.” Social Science and Medicine 122.

Mayer, Victoria L, Amy Hillier, Marcus A Bachhuber, Judith A Long. 2014. “Food Insecurity, Neighborhood Food Access, and Food Assistance in Philadelphia.” Journal of Urban Health 91(6).

 

Faculty Fellow

Mark Alan Hughes

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Professor of Practice

Faculty Director, Kleinman Center for Energy Policy

About

Mark Alan Hughes is Professor of Practice in the School of Design and founding Faculty Director of Penn’s Kleinman Center for Energy Policy. He is also the founding Faculty Director of the Fels Policy Research Initiative in the School of Arts and Sciences, a Senior Fellow of the Wharton School’s Initiative for Global Environmental Leadership, and a Distinguished Scholar in Residence at Penn’s Fox Leadership Program. Hughes has published in the leading journals of economic geography, urban economics, political science, policy analysis, and won the National Planning Award for his research in city and regional planning. He was Chief Policy Adviser to Mayor Michael Nutter and the founding Director of Sustainability for the City of Philadelphia, where he led the creation of the city’s Greenworks Plan. He has designed and fielded national policy research projects in a variety of areas including the Bridges to Work program in transportation, the Transitional Work Corporation in job training and placement, the Campaign for Working Families in EITC participation, and the Energy Efficient Buildings Hub in regional economic development. 

 

Selected Publications

Hughes, Mark Alan, Cornelia Colijn, and Oscar Serpell. 2017. “Comparative Pathways to Regional Energy Transition.” Kleinman Policy Digest available at http://kleinmanenergy.upenn.edu/pathways.

Hughes, Mark Alan, Cornelia Colijn, and Oscar Serpell. 2017. “Managing Risk in the Energyshed.” LA+ Journal 6(Fall).

Hughes, Mark Ala. 2017. “No Acceptable Alternative to Paris.” The Philadelphia Inquirer, June 15. http://kleinmanenergy.upenn.edu/blog/2017/06/12/there-no-acceptable-alternative-paris.

 

Faculty Fellow

John Keene

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Professor Emeritus of City and Regional Planning

About

John Keene is Professor Emeritus of City and Regional Planning in the Department of City and Regional Planning in the School of Design. His teaching and research interests focus on the legal aspects of city and regional planning, land development regulation, strategies for sustainable development, environmental planning and law, legal and policy issues relating to brownfield remediation, and management of urban growth. Keene has advised local governments on the legal aspects of environmental and farmland protection. Keene chaired the Department of City and Regional Planning from 1988 to 1992 and served two terms as Chair of the Graduate Group in City and Regional Planning. During 1999, 2000, and 2001, he served consecutively as Chair-Elect, Chair, and past Chair of the Faculty Senate of the University of Pennsylvania. He served as University Ombudsman from 1978-84 and 2006-09.

 

Selected Publications

Daniels, Thomas, and John C. Keene. 2018 (forthcoming). The Law of Agricultural Land Preservation. American Bar Association.

Keene, John. 2015. “Environmental Planning.” In The International Encyclopedia of the Social and Behavioral Sciences 7. Amsterdam: Elsevier.

Keene, John. 2006. “When Does Regulation Go Too Far? The Supreme Court’s Analytical Framework for Drawing the Line Between an Exercise of the Police Power and an Exercise of the Power of Eminent Domain.” Penn State Environmental Law Review 14.

Keene, John. et al. 1997. Saving American Farmland: What Works? American Farmland Trust Publications Division.

Coughlin, Robert E. and John C. Keene, senior authors and editors. 1981. The Protection of Farmland: A Reference Guidebook for State and Local Governments. National Agricultural Lands Study.

 

Affiliated PhD Student

Maryam Khojasteh

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PhD Candidate, City and Regional Planning, School of Design, University of Pennslyvania

About

Maryam is a PhD student in the City and Regional Planning program at PennDesign. She is interested in community-based research that explores the intersection of public health, community food system and community economic development. She received her master degree in Urban Planning from SUNY at Buffalo. Prior to coming to Penn, she worked as a research associate at the Food Systems Planning and Healthy Communities Lab in Buffalo NY. She worked toward building the capacity of non-profit organizations and local governments to strengthen community food systems as well as coordinating on the ground health interventions to promote active living among school-aged children. Her current project explores the ways that immigrant food entrepreneurs impact the health and well-being of immigrants and receiving communities. 

 

Selected Publications

Khojasteh, Maryam, and Samina Raja. 2016. “Agents of Change: Role of Immigrants in Creating Healthier Food Environments.” Journal of Hunger and Environmental Nutrition. 1-29

Baek, So-Ra, Samina Raja, Nathan Attard, and Maryam Khojasteh. 2016. “Acculturating into (In)active Commuting to School: Differences among Children of Foreign-born and US-born parents.” Children, Youth, and Environment 26 (1):37-55

 

Affiliated PhD Student

Chaeri Kim

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Doctoral Student, City and Regional Planning, School of Design, University of Pennsylvania.

About

Chaeri Kim is a doctoral student in City and Regional Planning at the University of Pennsylvania. Her research focuses on sustainable design. Prior to coming to the University of Pennslyvania, she worked at an architectural design firm and as a real estate investment analyst. She received her Master of Science in Real Estate from New York University and her B.A. in English Literature, Hankuk University of Foreign Studies.

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