People

Penn IUR is affiliated with more than 200 experts in the field of urbanism. Its Faculty Fellows program identifies faculty at the University of Pennsylvania with a demonstrated interest in urban research; the Penn IUR Scholars program identifies urban scholars outside of Penn; and the Penn IUR Fellows program identifies expert urban practitioners. Together, these programs foster a community of scholars and encourage cross-disciplinary collaboration.

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Affiliated PhD Student

Austin Lee

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PhD Candidate, Sociology, School of Arts & Sciences, University of Philadelphia

About

Austin Lee is a current Ph.D. student in Sociology at the University of Pennsylvania. She received her Bachelor’s degree in Black Studies from Amherst College. Her research focuses on Black people’s use of digital platforms to discuss changes in their physical communities. She’s also interested in neighborhood change and how Black women navigate public space.

Faculty Fellow

Iourii Manovskii

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Associate Professor of Economics

About

Professor Manovskii is Associate Professor of Economics at Penn, Associate Editor of Macroeconomic Dynamics, Research Affiliate at the Center for Economic Policy Research, Faculty Research Fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research, and Research Fellow at the Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) in Bonn. His research encompasses the fields of macroeconomics and labor economics, focusing on the quantitative study of labor markets (employment, unemployment, vacancies, human capital accumulation and destruction, the determination of wages, worker mobility across jobs and occupations, and the behavior of these variables over the business cycle) using dynamic general equilibrium models developed mostly in the field of macroeconomics. These calibrated models are used to study the effects of policies, such as progressive taxes, employer-based health insurance system, and government worker training programs.

 

Selected Publications

Hagedorn, Marcus, Tzuo Hann Law, and Iourii Manovskii. 2017. “Identifying Equilibrium Models of Labor Market Sorting.” Econometrica 85(1): 29-65.

Hagedorn, Marcus, Iourii Manovskii, and Sergiy Stetsenko. 2016. “Taxation and Unemployment in Models with Heterogeneous Workers.” Review of Economic Dynamics 19(1): 161-189.

Groess, Fane, Iourii Manovskii, and Philipp Kircher. 2015. “The U-Shapes of Occupational Mobility.” Review of Economic Studies 82(2):  659-692.

Jeong, Hyeok, Yong Kim, and Iourii Manovskii. 2015. “The Price of Experience.” American Economic Review 105(2): 784-815.

Hagedorn, Marcus and Iourii Manovskii. 2013. “Job Selection and Wages Over the Business Cycle.” American Economic Review 103(2): 771-803.

Faculty Fellow

Rebecca Maynard

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University Trustee Professor of Education and Social Policy

About

Rebecca Maynard is University Trustee Professor of Education and Social Policy in the Education Policy Division of the Graduate School of Education. She is a leading expert in the design and conduct of randomized controlled trials in the areas of education and social policy. She has conducted influential methodological research, recently published open-ware tools to support the efficient design of rigorous impact evaluations, and been a leader in the development and application of methods for conducting systematic reviews of evidence on program effectiveness. She is a Fellow of the American Education Research Association; Past President of the Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management; recipient of the Peter H. Rossi Award for Contributions to the Theory and Practice of Program Evaluation (2009); co-recipient of the Society of Prevention Research Public Service Award (2008); and recipient of the Best Book Award, Society for Research on Adolescents (1998). Her current research projects range from an international comparative study of strategies for preparing secondary school math and science teachers to studies of innovative strategies for preparing low-skilled young adults for the workforce both in the United States and in developing countries. She recently returned to Penn following a two-year leave to serve as Commissioner of the National Center for Education Evaluation and Regional Assistance at the Institute of Education Sciences. 

Selected Publications

Maynard, Rebecca, Naomi Goldstein, and Demetra Smith Nightingale. 2016. “Program and Policy Evaluations in Practice: Highlights from the Federal Perspective.” New Directions for Evaluation Winter (152): 109-135.

Granger, Robert C. and Rebecca Maynard. 2015. “Unlocking the Potential of the ‘What Works’ Approach to Policymaking and Practice.” American Journal of Evaluation 36(4): 558- 569.

Maynard, Rebecca, and Larry Orr. 2015. “Social Experiments.” In International Encyclopedia of the Social and Behavioral Sciences. Amsterdam: Elsevier.

Hoffman, S., and R. Maynard, eds. 2008. Kids Having Kids: Economic Costs and Social Consequences of Teen Pregnancy, 2nd Edition. Washington, DC: Urban Institute Press.

Faculty Fellow

Matthew McHugh

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The Independence Chair for Nursing Education; Professor of Nursing

Associate Director, Center for Health Outcomes and Policy Research

Faculty Director, Nursing and Health Care Management Coordinated Dual Degree Program

School/Department

Areas of Interest

    About

    Matthew McHugh is The Independence Chair for Nursing Education and Professor of Nursing in the Department of Biobehavioral Health Sciences in the School of Nursing; Associate Director of the Center for Health Outcomes and Policy Research; and Faculty Director of the Nursing and Health Care Management Coordinated Dual Degree Program. McHugh is a nursing outcomes and policy researcher as well as a family nurse practitioner and psychiatric–mental health clinical nurse specialist. The fundamental question underlying his research is “How does the organization of nursing influence the achievement of our most important national health policy goals?” He draws on his expertise in nursing, law, public health, and health services research to conduct studies demonstrating nursing’s position as a force for quality, equity, and innovation in health services. 

    Selected Publications

    McHugh, MD, LH Aiken, ME Eckenhoff, LR Burns. 2016. “Achieving Kaiser Permanente quality.” Health Care Management Review 41(3): 178-88.

    Stimpfel, A.W., D.M. Sloane, M.D. McHugh, , and L.H. Aiken. 2016. “Hospitals known for nursing excellence associated with better hospital experiences for patients.” Health Services Research 51: 1120-1134.

    Chau, Janita P. C., Suzanne H. S. Lo, K. C. Choi, Eric L. S. Chan, Matthew D. McHugh, Danny W. K. Tong, Angela M. L. Kwok, W. Y. Ip, Iris F. K. Lee, and Diana T. F. Lee. 2015. “A longitudinal examination of the association between nurse staffing levels, the practice environment and nurse-sensitive patient outcomes in hospitals.” BMC Health Services Research 15: 538.

    Silber, Jeffrey H., Paul R. Rosenbaum, Matthew D. McHugh, Justin M. Ludwig, Herbert L. Smith, Bijan A. Niknam, Orit Even-Shoshan, Lee A. Fleisher, Rachel R. Kelz, and Linda H. Aiken. 2016. “Comparing the value of better nursing work environments across different levels of patient risk.” JAMA Surgery 151(6), 527-536.

    McHugh, M.D., Rochman, M.F., Sloane, D.M., Berg, R.A., Mancini, M.E., Nadkarni, V.M., Merchant, R. M., and Aiken, L.H. for the American Heart Associations Get with the Guidelines-Resuscitation Investigators. 2016. “Better nurse staffing and nurse work environments associated with increased survival of in-hospital cardiac arrest patients.” Medical Care 54: 74-80.

    Faculty Fellow

    Afaf Meleis

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    Dean Emerita and Professor of Nursing and Sociology

    About

    Afaf Meleis is Dean Emeritus and Professor of Nursing and Sociology in the Department of Family and Community Health in the School of Nursing. Her scholarship is focused on global health, immigrant and international health, women’s health, and on the theoretical development of the nursing discipline. She is the author of more than 175 articles about women’s health in developing countries, transitions theory, doctoral education in nursing, and interprofessional education in social sciences, nursing, and medical journals; over forty chapters; seven books; and numerous monographs and proceedings.

    Meleis is a sought-after keynote speaker for national and international conferences on women’s health and development, disparities in healthcare, and international health. She has been invited for visiting professorships, and to conduct symposia, present keynote addresses, serve on boards, plan conferences, and consult on women’s health research and doctoral education nationally and internationally (in Asia, Africa, Europe, Australia, South America and North America). Prior to coming to Penn, Meleis was on the nursing faculty of at the University of California, Los Angeles and the University of California, San Francisco for thirty-four years.

    She is a Fellow of the Royal College of Nursing in the UK, the American Academy of Nursing, and the College of Physicians of Philadelphia; a member of the Institute of Medicine, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Nurse Faculty Scholar National Advisory Committee, the Josiah Macy Jr. Foundation Macy Faculty Scholars program, and the George W. Bush Presidential Center Women’s Initiative Policy Advisory Council; and the National Institutes of Health Advisory Committee on Research on Women’s Health; a Board Member of CARE, and the Consortium of Universities for Global Health; co-chair of the IOM Global Forum on Innovation for Health Professional Education and the Harvard School of Public Health-Penn Nursing-Lancet Commission on Women and Health. Meleis is also President Emerita and Counsel General Emerita of the International Council on Women's Health Issues (ICOWHI) and the former Global Ambassador for the Girl Child Initiative of the International Council of Nurses (ICN).  

    Selected Publications

    Meleis, A.I., and C.G. Glickman. 2014. “A passion in nursing for justice and equity: Thoughts for the future using our past.” In Philosophies and Practices of Emancipatroy Nursing: Social Justice as Praxis, edited by P.N. Kagan, M.C. Smith, and P. Chinn. New York: Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group.

    Meleis, A.I., and M. Meleis. 2012. “People of Egyptian heritage.” In Transcultural health care: A culturally competent approach, 4th Edition, edited by L.D. Purnell and B.J. Paulanka. Philadelphia, PA: F.A. Davis.

    Meleis, A.I., and K.L. Schumacher. 2011. “Transitions and health.” In Encyclopedia of Nursing Research, 3rd Edition, edited by J.J. Fitzpatrick and M. Wallace Kazer. New York, NY: Springer.

    Meleis, A.I., E. Birch, and S. Wachter, eds. 2011. Women's Health and the World's Cities. Philadelphia, PA: University of Pennsylvania Press.

    Fellow

    Rose Molokoane

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    Deputy President, Shack/Slum Dwellers International (SDI)

    National Coordinator, South African Alliance and the Federation of the Urban Poor (FEDUP)

    About

    Rose Molokoane is a National Coordinator of the South African Alliance and the Federation of the Urban Poor (FEDUP), and Deputy President of Shack/Slum Dwellers International (SDI), a global network of slum dweller federations in 33 countries across the Global South. In addition, she serves as Chair of the World Urban Campaign and co-Chair of the Grassroots Constituency Group of the General Assembly of Partners. She is a resident and member of the Oukasie savings scheme in a slum settlement outside Pretoria, South Africa. A veteran of the anti-apartheid struggle, she is one of the most internationally recognized grassroots activists involved in land tenure and housing issues. FEDUP has helped more than 150,000 slum dwellers, the vast majority of whom are women, to pool their savings and improve their lives. This has won them sufficient standing to negotiate with government for a progressive housing policy that has already produced 15,000 new homes and secured more than 1,000 hectares of government land for development. Molokoane has initiated federations of savings schemes throughout Africa, Asia, and Latin America. She was awarded the UN-Habitat Scroll of Honor in 2005 for her struggle to bring land and homes to the poor.

    Affiliated PhD Student

    Kimberly Noronha

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    PhD Candidate, City and Regional Planning, School of Design, University of Pennsylvania

    About

    Kimberly M. Noronha is a doctoral student in City and Regional Planning at the University of Pennsylvania School of Design. Prior to her arrival at Penn, Kimberly worked extensively in India on a wide variety of urban issues including: urbanization policy, poverty, livelihoods, education and water and sanitation. In more than 15 years in the development sector, she has worked with governments, NGOs, implementing agencies and research institutes to formulate policy, coordinate programs and conduct research. She has an MPhil in African Studies from the University of Delhi and an MSc in Development Studies from the School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London.

    Selected Publications

    Noronha, Kimberly and Shubhagato Dasgupta. 2016. Monitoring Open Discharge-Free India: A Comprehensive Sanitation Matrix. CPR Research Report. New Delhi: Centre for Policy Research. Available from: http://cprindia.org/research/reports/ monitoring-open-discharge-free- india-comprehensive-sanitation-matrix. [DOI: 10.13140/RG.2.2.33228.41607]

    Naik, Mukta and Kimberly M. Noronha. 2016. “Leveraging National Schemes to Support a Heritage Agenda in India”. Context: Special Issue on Asia and Urban Heritage XII:79-81

    Shubhagato Dasgupta, DTV Raghu Ramaswamy, Kimberly Noronha, Smitha Rao, Seetharaman R., Nikhil George, Amandeep Singh, Tripti Singh, Swati Dhiman, Aditya Bhol. 2015. Swachh Bharat: Industry Engagement – Scope & Examples. SCI-FI: Sanitation Initiative, Research Report. New Delhi: Centre for Policy Research [DOI: 10.13140/RG.2.1.4724.3287]

    Fellow

    Sheela Patel

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    Founder Director, Society for Promotion of Area Resource Centres (SPARC)

    About

    Sheela Patel is Founder Director of the Society for Promotion of Area Resource Centres (SPARC), a Mumbai-based NGO that has been working on housing and infrastructure rights for the urban poor for since 1984. She also played a key role in the expansion of Mahila Milan, a federation of collectives of women living in slums across India. Patel is also the Chair of Slum/Shack Dwellers International (SDI), an international network of poor people's organizations and supporting NGOs, active in Asia and Africa. She has represented Sdi as member or advisor in many national and international task forces and committees.  Patel has received the David Rockefeller Bridging Leadership Award from the Synergos Institute in recognition of her extensive efforts to ameliorate urban poverty, and Padmashree a national award from the Indian government for her work on urban poverty issues.

    Selected Publications

    Patel, Sheela. 2013. Upgrade, Rehouse or Resettle? An Assessment of the Indian Government’s Basic Services for the Urban Poor (BSUP) Programme. Environment & Urbanization, 25(1): 177-188.

    Patel, Sheela, Carrie Baptist, Celine D’Cruz. 2012. Knowledge is power – Informal Communities Assert Their Right to the City through SDI and Community-led Enumerations. Environment & Urbanization, 24(1).

    Patel, Sheela. 2011. “Are Women Victims, or Are They Warriors?” In Women’s Health and the World’s Cities, chapter 6, Afaf Ibrahim, Meleis, Eugénie L. Birch, Susan M. Wachter, eds. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.

    Patel, Sheela and Diana Mitlin. 2010. Gender Issues and Slum/Shack Dweller Federations (report). International Institute for Environment and Development.

    Patel, Sheela, Shaaban Sheuya, Philippa Howden-Chapman. 2007.  The Design of Housing and Shelter Programs: The Social and Environmental Determinants of Inequalities. Journal of Urban Health, 84(1): 98-108.

    Fellow

    Janice Perlman

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    Founder and President, The Mega-Cities Project

    About

    Janice Perlman is Founder and President of The Mega-Cities Project: Innovations for Urban Life, a global non-profit network designed to shorten the lag time between ideas and implementation in urban problem solving. Perlman’s most recent book, Favela: Four Decades of Living on the Edge in Rio de Janeiro is based on her longitudinal study tracing changes over four generations in Rio’s favelas. She first lived in the favelas in 1968-’69 and challenged prevailing stereotypes with her first book, The Myth of Marginality.  She was formerly a professor in the Department of City and Regional Planning at the University of California, and has received many major awards, including a Guggenheim, the C Wright Mills Award, the Chester Rapkin Award, the American Publishers’ PROSE Award and the Global Citizens Award.  

    Selected Publications

    Perlman, Janice. 2010. Favela: Four Decades of Living on the Edge in Rio de Janeiro. New York: Oxford University Press.

    Perlman, Janice. 2004. From the Marginality of the 1960s, to the 'New Poverty’ of Today: A LARR Research Forum, Latin American Research Review, Peter Ward (ed.) 39: 1.

    Perlman, Janice. 1990. A Dual Strategy for Deliberate Social Change in Cities. Cities: The International Quarterly of Urban Policy, 3-15.

    Perlman, Janice. 1987. Misconceptions about the Urban Poor and the Dynamics of Housing Policy Evolution. Journal of Planning Education and Research, 6(3): 187-196.

    Perlman, Janice. 1976. The Myth of Marginality: Urban Poverty and Politics in Rio de Janeiro. Berkeley: University of California Press.

    Perlman, Janice. 1976. Grassrooting the System. Social Policy, VII(2): 4-20. 

    Penn IUR Scholar

    Steven Raphael

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    Professor of Public Policy, Richard and Rhonda Goldman School of Public Policy, University of California, Berkeley

    About

    Steven Raphael is Professor of Public Policy at the Richard and Rhonda Goldman School of Public Policy at the University of California, Berkeley. His areas of expertise are labor and employment, race and ethnicity, criminal justice, employment discrimination, labor economics, racial inequality, and urban economics. Raphael has authored several research projects investigating the relationship between racial segregation in housing markets and the relative employment prospects of African Americans. He has also written theoretical and empirical papers on the economics of discrimination, the role of access to transportation in determining employment outcomes, the relationship between unemployment and crime, the role of peer influences on youth behavior, the effect of trade unions on wage structures, and homelessness.

    Selected Publications

    Raphael, Steven, and R.G. Gonzales Gonzales. 2017. Undocumented Immigrants and
    Their Experience with Illegality, Russell Sage Foundation, Journal of Social Sciences,
    Volume 3 Number 4.

    Raphael, Steven. 2014. The New Scarlet Letter? Negotiating the U.S. Labor Market with a
    Criminal Record, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research, Kalamazoo, MI. 

    Card, David and Steven Raphael, eds. 2013. Immigration, Poverty, and Socioeconomic Inequality. New York: Russell Sage Foundation.

    Raphael, Steven and Michael Stoll. 2013. Why Are So Many Americans in Prison? New York: Russell Sage Foundation.

    Johnson, Rucker and Steven Raphael. 2012. How Much Crime Reduction Does the Marginal Prisoner Buy? Journal of Law and Economics, 55(2): 275-310.

    Raphael, Steven and Michael Stoll, eds. 2009. Do Prisons Make Us Safer? The Benefits and Costs of the Prison Boom. New York: Russell Sage Foundation.

    Penn IUR Scholar

    Stephen L. Ross

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    Professor of Economics, Department of Economics, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, University of Connecticut

    Areas of Interest

      About

      Stephen L. Ross is Professor of Economics at the University of Connecticut. His general areas of expertise are urban economics, public finance, and labor economics. He focuses his research largely on housing and mortgage lending discrimination, residential and school segregation, neighborhood and peer effects, and state and local governments. Ross has been published in a number of distinguished scholarly journals including the Journal of Political Economy, Review of Economics and Statistics, The Economic Journal, and The American Economic Journal. His research has earned him a variety of honors and positions, and he is currently a member of the editorial board on the Journal of Housing Economics, the Regional Science and Urban Economics, and the Journal of Urban Economics. He is also a Councilor at Large for the North American Regional Science Council. 

      Selected Publications

      Turner, M.S., and Stephen L. Ross. 2004. Discrimination in Metropolitan Housing Markets: Phase III – Native Americans. Washington, DC: Department of Housing and Urban Development.

      Turner, M.S., and Stephen L. Ross. 2003. Discrimination in Metropolitan Housing Markets: Phase II – Asians and Pacific Islanders. Washington, DC: Department of Housing and Urban Development.

      Turner, M.S., Stephen L. Ross, George C. Galster, and John Yinger. Discrimination in Metropolitan Housing Markets: National Results from Phase 1 of HDS 2000.  Washington, DC: Department of Housing and Urban Development.

      Kristopher Gerardi , Stephen L. Ross, and Paul Willen. 2011. Understanding the Foreclosure Crisis, and Decoding Misperceptions: The Role of Underwriting and Appropriate Policy Responses. Journal of Policy, Analysis and Management: Point-Counterpoint, 30: 382-388 and 396-398.

      Affiliated PhD Student

      Edward Smith

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      Doctoral Candidate, Graduate School of Education, University of Pennsylvania

      About

      Edward J. Smith is a Ph.D. student at Penn GSE. He previously worked as a Senior Policy Analyst in the Research and Policy Institute at NASPA, an association comprised of 13,000 higher education professionals in all 50 states, eight U.S. Territories, and 25 countries. Ed has also worked as a Research Analyst at the Institute for Higher Education Policy in Washington and taught English for three years at the University of the District of Columbia Community College. His research focuses on building and sustaining education attainment efforts in metropolitan areas, with a particular emphasis on better understanding the effects of municipal, institutional, and community practices and policies on educational outcomes. Ed earned his bachelor’s degree in Economics and master’s degree in College Student Affairs from The Pennsylvania State University.

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