People

Penn IUR is affiliated with more than 200 experts in the field of urbanism. Its Faculty Fellows program identifies faculty at the University of Pennsylvania with a demonstrated interest in urban research; the Penn IUR Scholars program identifies urban scholars outside of Penn; and the Penn IUR Fellows program identifies expert urban practitioners. Together, these programs foster a community of scholars and encourage cross-disciplinary collaboration.

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Affiliated PhD Student

Jane Abell

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Doctoral Candidate in Anthropology, University of Pennsylvania

About

Jane Lief Abell is a second year doctoral student in Anthropology at the University of Pennsylvania. Her research explores Islam in the United States, with a particular focus on how race and religion inform relations among "native" and immigrant Muslim groups. Currently, she is working with Al-Bustan Seeds of Culture, an Arabic language and arts organization based in West Philly, and conducting fieldwork in Northeast Philadelphia. Prior to entering graduate school, Jane held several research and editorial positions at the Center for Middle East Studies at Harvard University; Harvard Divinity School; the Berkman Center for Internet & Society; the Consortium on Gender, Security, and Human Rights; and Law People Management, LLC. Jane holds a BA with High Honors in Sociology & Anthropology and Islamic Studies from Swarthmore College. 

 

Sydney Baloue

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PhD Candidate, Africana Studies, School of Arts & Sciences, University of Pennyslvania

About

Sydney Baloue is a William Fontaine Fellow of Africana Studies at the University of Pennsylvania. His research explores Black dance and music subcultures and Black queer geographies within urban landscapes. He has a particular focus on the usage of oral histories to document genealogies of Black and Latinx LGBT communities in New York City and in Europe, which constitute ball/house culture and voguing. His research methods include oral histories, performance ethnography, data analysis and international/regional comparative research. Prior to entering graduate school at Penn, Sydney was awarded a German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD) Study Scholarship in 2011. He was a Transatlantic Fellow at Ecologic Institute in Berlin from 2012 to 2014. Sydney holds a dual-degree MSc/MA in Urban Policy from the London School of Economics and the Paris Institute of Political Studies (Sciences Po). He graduated magna cum laude with a BA in Political Science and French & Francophone Studies from the University of Pennsylvania in 2011.

Selected Publications

Sydney Baloue, (2016) Black and Latin@ Queer Geographies and Oral Histories of Ballroom Culture in New York City. (London, UK: Masters Thesis, London School of Economics and Politics, 2016).

Haut Conseil d’Egalité Entre Femmes et Hommes – Premier Ministre, (2015) Avis sur le harcèlement sexiste et les violences sexuelles dans les transports en commun. – Report for French Prime Minister’s Office No. 2015-04-16-VIO-16 (Paris, France: Haut Conseil d’Egalité Entre Femmes et Hommes, 2015)

Sydney Baloue and Cecile Moore, Think Tanks in a Time of Crisis and Paralysis: On the Sidelines or Catalysts for Ideas and Actions? (Philadelphia, PA: Think Tanks and Civil Societies Program, 2013).

Ecologic Institute, E.On, Policy Studies Institute (2013): Consumer preferences for smart homes: a comparative study between the United Kingdom, Germany and Italy. – Report for E.On under E.On International Research Initiative 2012.

Faculty Fellow

David Barnes

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Director of Health and Societies Major and Associate Professor

About

David Barnes is Associate Professor and Director of the Health and Societies Major in the Department of History and Sociology of Science in the School of Arts and Sciences, where he teaches the history of medicine and public health. Prior to joining Penn, Barnes taught for a year at the Institute for Liberal arts at Emory University and for seven years in the History of Science Department at Harvard University. His current research is concentrated in the history of infectious disease, epidemiology, and public health; nineteenth-century urban European social and cultural history; and the politics of international disease control programs. He has a forthcoming book on the history of the Lazaretto Quarantine Station, located outside of Philadelphia.

Selected Publications

Barnes, David. 2014. “Cargo, ‘Infection,’ Cargo, and the Logic of Quarantine in the Nineteenth Century.” Bulletin of the History of Medicine 88(1).

Barnes, David. 2010. “Targeting Patient Zero." In Tuberculosis Then and Now: Perspectives on the History of an Infectious Disease, 49-71, edited by Flurin Condrau and Michael Worboys.  Montreal, QC and Kingston, ON: McGill-Queen's University Press.

Barnes, David. 2006. The Great Stink of Paris and the Nineteenth-Century Struggle against Filth and Germs. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press.

Barnes, David. 2002. “Scents and Sensibilities: Disgust and the Meanings of Odors in Late Nineteenth-Century Paris." Historical Reflections/Réflexions historiques 28: 21-49.

Barnes, David. 1 995. The Making of a Social Disease: Tuberculosis in Nineteenth-Century France. University of California Press.

Faculty Fellow

Jere Behrman

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William R. Kenan, Jr. Professor of Economics

About

Jere R. Behrman is W.R. Kenan Jr. Professor of Economics and Sociology in the School of Arts and Sciences. A leading international researcher in empirical microeconomics with a focus on developing economies, Behrman has been Chair of Economics, Research Associate and Director of Penn’s Population Studies Center, Associate Director of the Lauder Institute, and Associate Director of Penn’s Population Aging Research Center, among other positions in the University. He has been an investigator on over 160 research projects, including 42 National Institutes of Health (NIH) and 14 National Science Foundation (NSF) grants, and has published over 400 articles and 35 books. The unifying dimension of much of this research is to improve empirical knowledge of the determinants of and the impacts of human resources given unobserved factors such as innate health and ability, the functioning of various institutions such as households and imperfect markets, and information imperfections. 

Selected Publications

Behrman, Jere R., Susan W. Parker, Petra E. Todd, and Kenneth I. Wolpin. 2015. "Aligning Learning Incentives of Students and Teachers: Results from a Social Experiment in Mexican High Schools." Journal of Political Economy 123(2): 325-64.

Richter, Linda M., Bernadette Daelmans, Joan Lombardi, Jody Heymann, Florencia Lopez Boo, Jere R. Behrman, Chunling Lu, Jane E. Lucas, Rafael Perez-Escamilla, Tarun Dua, Zulfiqar A. Bhutta, Karin Stenberg, Paul Gertler, and Gary L. Darmstadt. "Investing in the Foundation of Sustainable Development: Pathways to Scale up for Early Childhood Development. 2017. " The Lancet.

Allen, Franklin, Jere R. Behrman, Nancy Birdsall, Shahrokh Fardoust, Dani Rodrik, Andrew Steer, and Arvind Subramanian. 2014. Towards a Better Global Economy: Policy Implications for Global Citizens in the 21st Century. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Almedia, Rita, Jere Behrman, and David Robalino, editors. 2012. The Right Skills for the Job? Rethinking Effective Training Policies for Workers. Washington, DC: Social Protection, Human Development Network, World Bank. 

Faculty Fellow

David Brownlee

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Frances Shapiro-Weitzenhoffer Professor of 19th Century European Art

About

David Brownlee is the Frances Shapiro-Weitzenhoffer Professor of 19th Centurey European Art in the History of Art in the School of Arts and Sciences. He is a historian of modern architecture whose interests embrace a wide range of subjects in Europe and America, from the late 18th century to the present. Brownlee has won numerous fellowships and his work has earned three major publication prizes from the Society of Architectural Historians. He is a recipient of the University of Pennsylvania’s Lindback Award for Distinguished Teaching. 

Selected Publications

Brownlee, David, and Derek Gillman. 2012. The Barnes Foundation: Two Buildings, One Mission. New York: Skira Rizzoli.

Brownlee, David, David De Long, and Kathryn Hiesinger. 2001. Out of the Ordinary: Robert Venturi, Denise Scott Brown and Associates: Architecture, Urbanism, Design. Philadelphia: Philadelphia Museum of Art.

Thomas, George and David Brownlee. 2000. Building America’s First University: An Historical and Architectural Guide to the University of Pennsylvania. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.

Brownlee, David. 1997. Making a Modern Classic: The Architecture of the Philadelphia Museum of Art. Philadelphia: Philadelphia Museum of Art.

Brownlee, David B. and David G. De Long. 1991. Louis I. Kahn: In the Realm of Architecture. New York: Rizzoli International Publications.

 

Faculty Fellow

Camille Zubrinsky Charles

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Professor of Sociology; Walter H. and Leonore C. Anneberg Professor in the Social Sciences

Chair, Department of Africana Studies

About

Camille Z. Charles is Walter H. and Leonore C. Anneberg Professor in the Social Sciences, Professor of Sociology, Africana Studies, and Education, and Director of the Africana Studies in the School of Arts and Sciences. Her research interests are in the areas of urban inequality, racial attitudes and intergroup relations, racial residential segregation, minorities in higher education, and racial identity. 

Selected Publications

Kramer, Rory A., Brianna Remster, and Camille Z. Charles. In Press. “Black Lives and Police Tactics Matter.” Contexts, Summer: 20-25. (https://contexts.org/articles/black-lives-and-police-tactics-matter/).

Charles, Camille Z, Rory Kramer, Kimberly Torres, Rachelle Brunn-Bevel. 2015. “Intragroup Heterogeneity and Blackness: Effects of Racial Classification, Immigrant Origins, Social Class, and Social Context on the Racial Identity of Elite College Students.” Race and Social Problems 7(4).
Kramer, Rory, Ruth Burke, sand Camille Z. Charles. 2015. “When Change Doesn’t Matter: Racial Identity (In)consistency and Adolescent Well-being.” Sociology of Race and Ethnicity 1(2).

Charles, Camille Z., Douglas S. Massey, Mary J. Fischer, and Margarita Mooney, with Brooke A. Cunningham, and Gniesha Y. Dinwiddie. 2009. Taming the River: Negotiating the Academic, Financial and Social Currents in Selective Colleges and Universities. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.

Charles, Camille Zubrinsky. 2006. Won’t You Be My Neighbor? Race, Class and Residence in Los Angeles. New York: Russell Sage. 

Faculty Fellow

Daniel Aldana Cohen

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Assistant Professor

About

Daniel Aldana Cohen is Assistant Professor of Sociology in the School of Arts and Sciences. He researches and writes on climate politics, investigating the intersections of climate change, inequalities of race and social class, and the political projects of both elites and social movements in global cities of the North and South. Cohen's work has been published in Nature, Public Culture, Jacobin, Dissent, Public Books, NACLA Report on the Americas, and elsewhere.

Selected Publications

Wachsmuth, David, Daniel Aldana Cohen, and Hillary Angelo. 2016. “Expand the frontiers of urban sustainability: Social equity and global impacts are missing from measures of cities' environments friendliness.” Nature 536(7618): 391-393.

Cohen, Daniel Aldana. 2016. “The Rationed City: The politics of water, housing, and land use in drought-parched São Paulo.” Public Culture 28(2): 261-289.

Affiliated PhD Student

Lee Ann Custer

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Doctoral Candidate, History of Art, University of Pennsylvania

About

Lee Ann Custer is a doctoral student in History of Art at the University of Pennsylvania. Her research interests include the urban vernacular built environment and modern architectural history. Before coming to Penn, Lee Ann worked on a variety of architecture and urban studies initiatives, including the BMW Guggenheim Lab at the Guggenheim Museum and Spontaneous Interventions: Design Actions for the Common Good at the American Pavilion of the 13th Venice Architecture Biennale. Additionally, she has worked for SO – IL architects in New York, as well as for museum planning consultants Lord Cultural Resources. Lee Ann holds a BA in History of Art and Architecture from Harvard University, where she graduated magna cum laude with highest honors. 

Faculty Fellow

John DiIulio

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Frederic Fox Leadership Professor of Politics, Religion, and Civil Society

Director, Robert A. Fox Leadership Program

About

John DiIulio is the Frederic Fox Leadership Professor of Politics, Religion, and Civil Society in the Department of Political Science and Director of Penn's Robert A. Fox Leadership Program for undergraduates. Over the last quarter-century, he has won several major academic and teaching awards including the 2010 Ira Abrams Memorial Award and the 2010 Lindback Award for Distinguished Teaching. He has also chaired his academic association's standing committee on professional ethics. Outside academic life, he has developed programs to mentor the children of prisoners, provide literacy training in low-income communities, reduce homicides in high-crime police districts, and support inner-city Catholic schools that serve low-income children. He has been a Research Center Director at the Brookings Institution, the Manhattan Institute, and Public/Private Ventures. During his academic leave in 2001-2002, he served as first Director of the White House Office of Faith-Based and Community Initiatives. He is the author, co-author, and editor of over a dozen books and several hundred articles.

Selected Publications

DiIulio, John. 2014. Bring Back the Bureaucrats. Templeton Press. 

DiIulio, John, James Q. Wilson, and Meena Bose. American Government: Institutions and Policies, 14th edition. Wadsworth-Cengage.

DiIulio, John. 2007. Godly Republic: A Centrist Blueprint for America’s Faith-Based Future. University of California Press.

Caitlin Gorback

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PhD Candidate, Applied Economics, The Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania

School/Department

Areas of Interest

    About

    Caitlin is a fourth year doctoral student in the applied economics PhD program in the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania. Her interests span household and housing finance, real estate economics, and urban economics. Current work includes transportation infrastructure’s impact on commercial and residential rent gradients, how mortgage lenders incorporate neighborhood information updating into lending models, and the implications of young households’ participation in mortgage markets. More generally, she is interested in urban renewal and gentrification, affordable housing, and the demographic drivers of local housing markets. Prior to Wharton, Caitlin earning a B.S. in Economics from Duke University and worked in capital markets research at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York. 

    Faculty Fellow

    Andrea Goulet

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    Professor of Romance Languages; Graduate Chair, French; French and Francophone Studies

    About

    Andrea Goulet is Professor of Romance Languages in French and Francophone Studies and Graduate Chair of French in the School of Arts and Sciences. Prior to coming to Penn, she served as Associate Professor of French at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. She is the author of two books on French fiction and literature. Her current research interests include 19th and 20th century French fiction, critical theory, science and literature, detective fiction, and nouveau roman literature. She is currently co-chair of the Nineteenth-Century French Studies Association.

    Selected Publications

    Goulet, Andrea. Forthcoming. "Teaching Les Misérables: Crime and the Popular Press." In MLA Approaches to Teaching Hugo's Les Misérables, edited by Michal Ginsburg and Bradley Stephens.

    Goulet, Andrea. 2016. Legacies of the Rue Morgue: Space and Science in French Crime Fiction. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.

    Goulet, Andrea. 2016. "Du massacre de la rue Transnonain aux 'drames de la rue: Politique et théâtre de l'espace." Romantisme 171(2016): 53-64.

    Goulet, Andrea. 2006. Optiques: The Science of the Eye and the Birth of Modern French Fiction. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.

    Faculty Fellow

    David Grazian

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    Associate Professor of Sociology; Graduate Chair

    About

    David Grazian is Associate Professor of Sociology and Graduate Chair in the Department of Sociology in the School of Arts and Sciences. His research areas include sociology of culture, popular culture and mass media, urban sociology, symbolic interaction, race and ethnicity, ethnographic methods and social theory. Grazian teaches courses on popular culture, mass media and the arts, cities and urban sociology, social interaction and public behavior, and ethnographic methods. In his research he employs a variety of ethnographic and other qualitative methods to study the production and consumption of commercial entertainment in the urban milieu. He recently received a fellowship from the Institute for Advanced Studies (IAS) in Princeton, New Jersey to pursue his research full time during the 2013-2014 academic year. During his sabbatical year of residence, Grazian will complete a book manuscript on metropolitan zoos as repositories of culture as well as nature. The book is tentatively titled Where the Wild Things Aren’t: City Zoos and the Culture of Nature.

    Selected Publications

    Grazian, David. 2017. Mix it Up: Popular Culture, Mass Media, and Society, 2nd Edition. New York: W.W. Norton.

    Grazian, David. 2016. American Zoo: A Sociological Safari. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.

    Garner, Betsie and David Grazian. 2016. “Naturalizing Gender through Childhood Socialization Messages in a Zoo.” Social Psychology Quarterly 79(3): 181-198.

    Grazian, David. 2011. On the Make: The Hustle of Urban Nightlife. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

    Grazian, David. 2005. Blue Chicago: The Search for Authenticity in Urban Blues Clubs. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

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