People

Penn IUR is affiliated with more than 200 experts in the field of urbanism. Its Faculty Fellows program identifies faculty at the University of Pennsylvania with a demonstrated interest in urban research; the Penn IUR Scholars program identifies urban scholars outside of Penn; and the Penn IUR Fellows program identifies expert urban practitioners. Together, these programs foster a community of scholars and encourage cross-disciplinary collaboration.

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Faculty Fellow

David Grazian

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Associate Professor of Sociology; Graduate Chair

About

David Grazian is Associate Professor of Sociology and Graduate Chair in the Department of Sociology in the School of Arts and Sciences. His research areas include sociology of culture, popular culture and mass media, urban sociology, symbolic interaction, race and ethnicity, ethnographic methods and social theory. Grazian teaches courses on popular culture, mass media and the arts, cities and urban sociology, social interaction and public behavior, and ethnographic methods. In his research he employs a variety of ethnographic and other qualitative methods to study the production and consumption of commercial entertainment in the urban milieu. He recently received a fellowship from the Institute for Advanced Studies (IAS) in Princeton, New Jersey to pursue his research full time during the 2013-2014 academic year. During his sabbatical year of residence, Grazian will complete a book manuscript on metropolitan zoos as repositories of culture as well as nature. The book is tentatively titled Where the Wild Things Aren’t: City Zoos and the Culture of Nature.

 

Selected Publications

Grazian, David. 2017. Mix it Up: Popular Culture, Mass Media, and Society, 2nd Edition. New York: W.W. Norton.

Grazian, David. 2016. American Zoo: A Sociological Safari. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.

Garner, Betsie and David Grazian. 2016. “Naturalizing Gender through Childhood Socialization Messages in a Zoo.” Social Psychology Quarterly 79(3): 181-198.

Grazian, David. 2011. On the Make: The Hustle of Urban Nightlife. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Grazian, David. 2005. Blue Chicago: The Search for Authenticity in Urban Blues Clubs. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

 

Faculty Fellow

Sara Heller

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Assistant Professor of Criminology,School of Arts and Sciences, University of Pennsylvania

About

Heller, Sara B. “Summer Jobs Reduce Violence among Disadvantaged Youth” (2014). Science, Vol 346 Issue 6214

Heller, Sara B., Anuj K. Shah, Jonathan Guryan, Jens Ludwig, Sendhil Mullainathan & Harold A. Pollack (2015). “Thinking, Fast and Slow? Some Field Experiments to Reduce Crime and Dropout in Chicago.” NBER Working Paper 21178 (Revise & Resubmit)

Heller, Sara, Brian A. Jacob & Jens Ludwig (2011). “Family Income, Neighborhood Poverty, and Crime.” In Controlling Crime: Strategies and Tradeoffs, Eds. Philip J. Cook, Jens Ludwig & Justin McCrary. National Bureau of Economic Research Conference Report, University of Chicago Press

 

Faculty Fellow

Renata Holod

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College of Women Class of 1963 Term Professor in the Humanities

Curator, Near East Section, Penn Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology

About

Renata Holod is College of Women Class of 1963 Term Professor in the Humanities, History of Art Department; and Curator in the Near East Section, Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, both at the University of Pennsylvania. She has carried out archeological and architectural fieldwork in Syria, Iran, Morocco, Turkey, Central Asia, Tunisia, and Ukraine.

She is co-author and co-editor of City in the Desert (1978); Architecture and Community: Building in the Islamic World Today, Aperture, New York, (1983); The Mosque and the Modern World (1997); The City in the Islamic World (2008) and An Island Through Time: Jerba Studies (2009).

She was Convenor, Steering Committee Member, and Chair, Master Jury of the Aga Khan Award for Architecture; and was Director, Assessment Board, Aga Khan Trust for Culture, 2012-2013.

She sits on several advisory boards including the Fondation Max Van Berchem, Muqarnas, Annual in Islamic Art and Visual Culture; International Journal of Islamic Architecture; Ars Asiatiques; and Center for the Study of Material and Visual Cultures of Religion, Yale University. She has served as President, Board of Trustees at The Ukrainian Museum June 2013 - June 2017. 

 

Selected Publications

Jayyuusi, Salma Khadra, Renata Holod, Attilio Petruccioli, Andre Raymond. 2008. The City in the Islamic World. Brill Academic Pub.

Holod, Renata and Hasan-Uddin Khan. 1997. The Mosque and the Modern World: Architects, Patrons, and Designs Since the 1950s. Thames and Hudson.

Holod, Renata, Hmet Evin, and Suha Özkan, eds. 1984. Modern Turkish Architecture, 1st ed. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.

Holod, Renata. 1983. Architecture and Community: Building in the Islamic World Today: The Aga Khan Award for Architecture. New York: Aperture.

Grabar, Oleg, Renata Holod, James Knustad, and William Trousdale. 1978. City in the Desert: An Account of the Archaeological Expedition to Qasr al-Hayr al-Sharqi, Syria. Harvard Middle East Monograph Series 23/24. Cambridge: Harvard University Press.

 

Faculty Fellow

John Jackson, Jr.

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Dean, School of Social Policy & Practice

Richard Perry University Professor

Penn Integrates Knowledge (PIK) Professor

About

ohn L. Jackson, Jr., is Dean of the School of Social Policy & Practice and Richard Perry University Professor at the University of Pennsylvania. Jackson received his BA in Communication (Radio/TV/Film) summa cum laude from Howard University (1993), earned his PhD in Anthropology with distinction from Columbia University (2000), and served as a junior fellow at the Harvard University Society of Fellows (1999-2002). He is the author of Harlemworld: Doing Race and Class in Contemporary Black America (University of Chicago Press, 2001); Real Black: Adventures in Racial Sincerity (University of Chicago Press, 2005); Racial Paranoia: The Unintended Consequences of Political Correctness (Basic Civitas, 2008); Thin Description: Ethnography and the African Hebrew Israelites of Jerusalem (Harvard University Press, 2013); Impolite Conversations: On Race, Politics, Sex, Money, and Religion, co-written with Cora Daniels (Atria/Simon & Schuster, 2014), and Televised Redemption: Black Religious Media and Racial Empowerment (NYU Press, 2016), co-written with Carolyn Rouse and Marla Frederick. His is also editor of Social Policy and Social Justice (2016), distributed by the University of Pennsylvania Press. His most recently completed film, co-directed with Deborah A. Thomas, is Bad Friday: Rastafari after Coral Gardens (Third World Newsreel, 2012). Jackson previously served as Senior Advisor to the Provost on Diversity and Associate Dean of Administration in the Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Pennsylvania. 

 

Selected Publications

Jackson, John L. 2016. Social Policy and Social Justice. Philadelphia, PA: University of Pennsylvania Press.

Jackson, John L., Carolyn Rouse, and Marla Frederick. 2016. Televised Redemption: The Media Production of Black Muslims, Jews, and Christians. New York City: New York University Press.

Jackson, John L. and Cora Daniels. 2014. Impolite Conversations: On Race, Class, Sex, Religion, and Politics. New York City: Atria Books [Simon and Schuster imprint].

Jackson, John L. 2013. Thin Description: Ethnography and the African Hebrew Israelites of Jerusalem. Cambridge: Harvard University Press.

Jackson, John L. 2008. Racial Paranoia: The Unintended Consequences of Political Correctness. New York City: Basic Civitas.

 

Penn IUR Scholar

Devesh Kapur

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Starr Foundation South Asia Studies Professor

Director of Asia Programs

About

Devesh Kapur is Starr Foundation South Asia Studies Professor and Director of Asia Programs for Johns Hopkins University. He is formerly the Director of the Center for the Advanced Study of India and Professor of Political Science in the School of Arts and Sciences at the University of Pennsylvania. Prior to arriving at Penn, Kapur was Associate Professor of Government at the University of Texas at Austin, and before that the Frederick Danziger Associate Professor of Government at Harvard. His research focuses on human capital, national and international public institutions, and the ways in which local-global linkages, especially international migration and international institutions, affect political and economic change in developing countries, especially India. 

 

Selected Publications

Kapur, Devesh, Pratap Bhanu Mehta, and Milan Vaishnav, eds. 2017. Rethinking Public Institutions in India. Oxford University Press.

Kapur, Devesh, and Pratap Bhanu Mehta, eds. 2017. Navigating the Labyrinth: Perspectives on India’s Higher Education. Orient BlackSwan.

Chakravorty, Sanjoy, Devesh Kapur, Nirvikar Singh. 2016. The Other One Percent: Indians in America. Oxford University Press.

Kapur, Devesh, D. Shyam Babu, and Chandra Bhan Prasad. 2014. Defying the Odds: The Rise of Dalit Entrepreneurs.  Random House India. 

Kapur, Devesh. 2010. Diaspora, Development, and Democracy: The Domestic Impact of International Migration from India. Princeton University Press.

 

Faculty Fellow

David Young Kim

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Assistant Professor of Art History

About

David Young Kim is Assistant Professor in the Department of History of Art in the School of Arts and Sciences. He teaches and researches Southern Renaissance art, with a focus on art literature, transcultural exchange, and material culture. He received his B.A. in English and French literature from Amherst College (1999) and his M.A. and Ph.D. from Harvard (2009), in addition to attending the Humboldt University in Berlin and the Université Paris Diderot-Paris 7. Before joining the Penn faculty in 2013, he was a postdoctoral faculty fellow (wissenschaftlicher Assistent) at the University of Zurich in Switzerland (2009-2013) and a visiting faculty member at the Universidade Federal de São Paulo in Brazil (2011-2013). In May 2017, he delivered the Tomàs Harris Lectures at the University College London. He received the 2017 Dean’s Award for Innovation in Teaching for his contributions to undergraduate education.

 

Selected Publications

Kim, David. Forthcoming. Authenticity and Art as Object: A Handbook of Terms. [compilation of keyword entries written by art history grad students as part of Mellon Object-Based Study Initiatives]

Kim, David. Forthcoming. “Stonework and Crack in Giovanni Bellini’s St. Francis in the Wilderness.” In Steinformen. Materialität, Qualität, Imitation, edited by Isabella Augart, Maurice Saß, and Iris Wenderholm. Berlin / Boston: De Gruyter.

Kim, David. Forthcoming. “The Triumph and Pathos of Perspective.” In Urban Artefacts: Triumphal Arches and the Paragone between the Arts, edited by Alina Payne. Pisa: Scuola Normale di Pisa Press.

Kim, David. 2014. The Traveling Artist in the Italian Renaissance. New Haven: Yale University Press.

Kim, David Y, ed. 2013. Matters of Weight: Force, Gravity, and Aesthetics in the Early Modern Period. Berlin: Edition Imorde.

 

Affiliated PhD Student

Austin Lee

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PhD Candidate, Sociology, School of Arts & Sciences, University of Philadelphia

About

Austin Lee is a current Ph.D. student in Sociology at the University of Pennsylvania. She received her Bachelor’s degree in Black Studies from Amherst College. Her research focuses on Black people’s use of digital platforms to discuss changes in their physical communities. She’s also interested in neighborhood change and how Black women navigate public space.

 

Faculty Fellow

Lynn Hollen Lees

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Professor of History Emeritus

About

Lynn Hollen Lees is Professor of History Emeritus, having retired in 2013 from her position as Vice Provost for Faculty after serving for several years as co-director of the Joseph H. Lauder Institute of Management and International Studies. Her teaching was primarily in the fields of British history, European social history, and world history. She has spent time as an exchange Professor at University College London, Catholic University of Leuven, and the University of Diponegoro in Indonesia, and was Chair of the Department of History between 1995 and 2001. Her research centers on European cities, their social organization, and their welfare institutions. 

 

Selected Publications

Crossley, Pamela K., Lynn Hollen Lees, and John W. Servos. 2012. Global Society: The World Since 1900, 3rd edition. Cengage Learning.

Lees, Lynn Hollen. 2008. The Solidarities of Strangers: The British Poor Laws and the People, 1700-1948. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Lees, Lynn Hollen and Andrew Lees. 2007. Cities and the Making of Modern Europe, 1750-1914. Cambridge University Press.

Lees, Lynn Hollen and Paul Hohenberg. 1995. The Making of Urban Europe, 1000-1995. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. 

Lees, Lynn Hollen. 1979. Exiles of Erin: Irish Migrants in Victorian London. Manchester: Manchester University Press. 

 

Faculty Fellow

Walter Licht

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Walter H. Annenberg Professor of History

About

Walter Licht is Walter H. Annenberg Professor of History in the School of Arts and Sciences. His expertise lies in the history of work and labor markets and he teaches courses in American economic and labor history. Licht began teaching at Penn in 1977. He has received the Ira Abrams Memorial Prize for Distinguished Teaching awarded by the School of Arts and Sciences and many grants and fellowships to pursue his scholarly interests. He has previously been Undergraduate Chair of the Department of History, Graduate Chair, and Chair. He also served as Associate Dean in the School of Arts and Sciences for ten years, responsible for graduate education, social science departments, area studies programs, and research and education centers. He is currently Faculty Director of Civic House and the Penn Civic Scholars Program. Licht is now working on a book entitled American Capitalisms: A Global History.

 

Selected Publications

Dublin, Thomas and Walter Licht. 2005. The Face of Decline: The Pennsylvania Anthracite Region in the Twentieth Century. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press.

Licht, Walter. 1995. Industrializing America: The Nineteenth Century. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press.

Licht, Walter. 1992. Getting Work: Philadelphia, 1840-1950. Cambridge: Harvard University Press.

Scranton, Phillip and Walter Licht. 1986. Work Sights: Industrial Philadelphia, 1890-1950. Philadelphia: Temple University Press.

Licht, Walter. 1983. Working For The Railroad: The Organization of Work in the Nineteenth Century. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.

 

Faculty Fellow

John MacDonald

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Professor of Criminology and Sociology

Penny and Robert A. Fox Faculty Director, Fels Institute of Government

About

John M. MacDonald is Penny and Robert A. Fox Faculty Director of Penn’s Fels Institute of Government and Professor of Criminology and Sociology in the Department of Criminology in the School of Arts and Sciences. He focuses primarily on the study of interpersonal violence, race, and ethnic disparities in criminal justice, and the effect of public policy responses on crime. His contributions to public policy research include numerous studies using rigorous, quasi-experimental and experimental designs showing the effects of social policies on crime, of institutional social justice reforms on crime, and more recently, the health effects of various policy interventions. He was awarded the Young Experimental Scholar Award by the Academy of Experimental Criminology for significant contributions to experimental research. He also received the David N. Kershaw Award for distinguished contribution to the field of public policy analysis and management from the American Association of Public Policy Analysis and Management. He is an elected Fellow of the Academy of Experimental Criminology. His latest urban research examines the remediating vacant land and abandoned houses on crime.

 

Selected Publications

Ridgeway, Greg and John M MacDonald. 2017. “Effect of Rail Transit on Crime: A Study of Los Angeles from 1988 to 2014.” Journal of Quantitative Criminology 33 (2): 277-291.

Chirico, Michael, Robert Inman, Charles Loeffler, John MacDonald, and Holger Sieg. 2017 “Procrastination and Property Tax Compliance: Evidence from a Field Experiment.” National Bureau of Economic Research 23243.

Kondo, MC, SH Han, GH Donovan, and JM MacDonald. 2017. “The association between urban trees and crime: Evidence from the spread of the emerald ash borer in Cincinnati.” Landscape and Urban Planning 157: 193-199

MacDonald, JM, N Nicosia, and BD Ukert. 2017. “Do Schools Cause Crime in Neighborhoods? Evidence from the Opening of Schools in Philadelphia.” Journal of Quantitative Criminology 1-24.

Branas, CC, MC Kondo, SM Murphy, EC South, D Polsky, and JM MacDonald. 2016. “Urban blight remediation as a cost-beneficial solution to firearm violence.” American Journal of Public Health 106(12): 2158-2164.

 

Faculty Fellow

Iourii Manovskii

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Associate Professor of Economics

About

Professor Manovskii is Associate Professor of Economics at Penn, Associate Editor of Macroeconomic Dynamics, Research Affiliate at the Center for Economic Policy Research, Faculty Research Fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research, and Research Fellow at the Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) in Bonn. His research encompasses the fields of macroeconomics and labor economics, focusing on the quantitative study of labor markets (employment, unemployment, vacancies, human capital accumulation and destruction, the determination of wages, worker mobility across jobs and occupations, and the behavior of these variables over the business cycle) using dynamic general equilibrium models developed mostly in the field of macroeconomics. These calibrated models are used to study the effects of policies, such as progressive taxes, employer-based health insurance system, and government worker training programs.

 

 

Selected Publications

Hagedorn, Marcus, Tzuo Hann Law, and Iourii Manovskii. 2017. “Identifying Equilibrium Models of Labor Market Sorting.” Econometrica 85(1): 29-65.

Hagedorn, Marcus, Iourii Manovskii, and Sergiy Stetsenko. 2016. “Taxation and Unemployment in Models with Heterogeneous Workers.” Review of Economic Dynamics 19(1): 161-189.

Groess, Fane, Iourii Manovskii, and Philipp Kircher. 2015. “The U-Shapes of Occupational Mobility.” Review of Economic Studies 82(2):  659-692.

Jeong, Hyeok, Yong Kim, and Iourii Manovskii. 2015. “The Price of Experience.” American Economic Review 105(2): 784-815.

Hagedorn, Marcus and Iourii Manovskii. 2013. “Job Selection and Wages Over the Business Cycle.” American Economic Review 103(2): 771-803.

 

Affiliated PhD Student

Samuel Ostroff

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Joint Doctoral Candidate in History and South Asia Studies, University of Pennsylvania

About

Samuel Ostroff is a joint Doctoral Candidate in History and South Asia Studies at Penn. He is currently writing his dissertation on the economic, environmental and imperial aspects of the Indian Ocean pearl trade in the late seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. In the field of urban studies, his work focuses on port-cities and urban networking across oceanic and global spaces in the early modern world. Aside from his dissertation research, Samuel is interested in urban planning, transportation, and policy in the global cities of the 21st century. Prior to Penn, Samuel completed his B.A. in History at Bucknell University and M.A. in Middle East and Asian Languages and Cultures at Columbia University.

 

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