People

Penn IUR is affiliated with more than 200 experts in the field of urbanism. Its Faculty Fellows program identifies faculty at the University of Pennsylvania with a demonstrated interest in urban research; the Penn IUR Scholars program identifies urban scholars outside of Penn; and the Penn IUR Fellows program identifies expert urban practitioners. Together, these programs foster a community of scholars and encourage cross-disciplinary collaboration.

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Penn IUR Scholar

Nisha Botchwey

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Associate Professor of City and Regional Planning, Georgia Institute of Technology

Areas of Interest

    About

    Nisha Botchwey is an Associate Professor of City and Regional Planning at the Georgia Institute of Technology.  An expert in health and the built environment as well as community engagement, she holds graduate degrees in both urban planning and public health.  Dedicated to effective pedagogy, Dr. Botchwey spent eight years as a professor at the University of Virginia, jointly appointed to the Department of Urban and Environmental Planning and the Department of Public Health Sciences, before arriving at Georgia Tech. Dr. Botchwey has published and researched widely, and currently focuses on topics including health and the built environment, public engagement methodologies, faith-based and secular organizations, and health equity.  She is co-author of Health Impact Assessment in the USA (in press), convener of a national expert panel on interdisciplinary workforce training between the public health and community design fields, and author of numerous articles.  Dr. Botchwey has won distinctions including an NSF ADVANCE Woman of Excellence Faculty Award, a Hesburgh Award Teaching Fellowship from Georgia Tech, and a Rockefeller-Penn Fellowship from the University of Pennsylvania’s School of Nursing. She also serves on the Advisory Board to the Director of the Centers of Disease Control Prevention and is co-Director of the National Academy of Environmental Design's Research Committee.

    Selected Publications

    Botchwey, N., C. Ross, M. Orenstein. Health Impact Assessments in the USA. New York: Springer, 2014.

    Botchwey, N., T. Fisher, M. Trowbridge. (2013). Green Health. Journal of Planning Education Research, in press.

    Botchwey, N., Guhathakurta, S., Lee, S. & Leous, A. (forthcoming). Quality of Life and Health in Atlanta. In H. Etienne and B. Faga (editors) Planning Atlanta. Chicago, IL: Planners Press.

    Trowbridge, M., T. Huang, N. Botchwey, T. Fisher, C. Pyke, A. Rodgers, R. Ballard-Barbash. (2013). Green Building and Childhood Obesity Prevention: Toward and Integrated ‘Green Health’ Environmental Design Research Framework. American Journal of Preventative Medicine, Forthcoming, in press.

    Dyjack, D.T., N. Botchwey, E. Marziale. (2013). Cross-sectoral Workforce Development: Examining the Intersection of Public Health and Community Design. Journal of Public Health Management and Practice 19(1): 97-99. 

    Penn IUR Scholar

    Charles Branas

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    Anna Cheskis Gelman and Murray Charles Gelman Professor Epidemiology, Chair, Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University

    Areas of Interest

      About

      Dr. Branas has conducted research that extends from urban and rural areas in the US to communities across the globe, incorporating place-based interventions and human geography. He has led win-win science that generates new knowledge while simultaneously creating positive, real-world changes and providing health-enhancing resources for local communities. His pioneering work on geographic access to medical care has changed the healthcare landscape, leading to the designation of new hospitals and a cottage industry of national scientific replications in the US and other countries for many conditions: trauma, cancer, stroke, etc. His research on the geography and factors underpinning gun violence has been some of the most impactful work of the past decades, being cited by landmark Supreme Court decisions, Congress, and the NIH Director. Dr. Branas has also led groundbreaking scientific work to transform thousands of vacant lots, abandoned houses and other blighted spaces in improving the health and safety of entire communities. These are the very first citywide randomized controlled trials of urban blight remediation and have shown this intervention to be a highly cost-effective solution to persistent urban health problems like gun violence. He has also worked internationally on four continents and led multi-national efforts, producing dozens of developing nation scientists, health programs for entire nations, citations from the WHO, the EU, and worldwide press coverage.

      Selected Publications

      Hohl BC, Wiley S, Wiebe DJ, Culyba AJ, Drake R, Branas CC. Association of drug and alcohol use with adolescent firearm homicide at individual, family, and neighborhood levels. JAMA Internal Medicine: 1-7, 2017.
       
      Branas CC, Kondo MC, Murphy SM, South EC, Polsky D: Urban blight remediation as a cost-beneficial solution to firearm violence. American Journal of Public Health 106: 1-7, 2016.
       
      Branas CC, Han S, Wiebe DJ: Alcohol use and firearm violence. Epidemiologic Reviews 38(1): 32-45, 2016.
      Fellow

      Monica Brezzi

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      Head of the Regional Analysis and Statistics Unit, OECD Directorate for Public Governance and Territorial Development

      Areas of Interest

        About

        Monica Brezzi is Head of the Regional Analysis and Statistics Unit in the OECD Directorate for Public Governance and Territorial Development. Her current activities focus on the analysis of regional comparative advantages and the assessment of policies to reduce inequalities in the access to key services for citizens. She has recently contributed to design a web mapping tool to help decision makers and citizens develop a better knowledge of their society using statistical information. Before joining OECD, she worked for the Ministry of Economic Development in Italy where she contributed to design and launch a performance-based policy to measure the efficiency of local public services. 
        Emerging Scholar

        Catherine Brinkley

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        Ph.D., Regional Planning, University of Pennsylvania

        Veterinary (VMD) student, University of Pennsylvania Veterinary School

        MS in Virology, Gothenburg University, Sweden

        Areas of Interest

          About

          Katie Brinkley completed her Ph.D. in Regional Planning at PennDesign in December 2013 and recently finished her last clinical year in the VMD program at the University of Pennsylvania Veterinary School. Brinkley’s Ph.D. in Regional Planning and Master’s degree in Virology, along with her current work as a Veterinary student, inform her research in ecosystem management; this research concentrates particularly on the prevention of animal-to-human disease and sustainable resource planning. Her research interests include public health, the rural-urban interface, animal agriculture, and food security. Brinkley’s dissertation uses GIS and spatial analytics to explore urban development morphologies as they impact the agricultural sector, regional economies and food distribution. She has worked with the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations to assess food access and waste management in low-income nations and is a former Fulbright Fellow.

          Selected Publications

          Brinkley, C. (2012). "Evaluating the Benefits of Peri-Urban Agriculture." Journal of Planning 

          Literature. 27(3): 259-269.

          Brinkley, C. (2013). "Avenues into Food Planning: a Review of Scholarly Food System Research." International Journal of Planning Studies. 18(2): 243-266.

          Brinkley, Catherine, Eugenie Birch, and Alexander Keating. (2013) "Feeding cities: Charting a research and practice agenda toward food security." Journal of Agriculture, Food Systems and Community Development.

          Brinkley, C. forthcoming. "Decoupled: successful planning policies in countries that have reduced per capita GHG emissions with continued economic growth," Environment and Planning C: Government and Policy.

          Fellow

          Paul C. Brophy

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          Principal, Brophy & Reilly, LLC

          Senior Fellow, Metropolitan Policy Program, Brookings Institution

          Senior Fellow, Center for Community Progress, Senior Scholar, George Warren School of Social Work, Washington University in St. Louis

          Areas of Interest

            About

            Paul C. Brophy is a principal with Brophy & Reilly, LLC – a consulting firm specializing in economic development, housing and community development, and the management of complex urban redevelopment projects – and a Nonresident Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution, a Senior Advisor to the Center for Community Progress, and a Senior Scholar at the Brown School at Washington University in St. Louis. One of Brophy’s specialties is the improvement of older industrial cities and the neighborhoods within those cities. He is also Senior Advisor to Enterprise Community Partners. Prior to his forming Brophy & Reilly, LLC in 1993, Brophy was President and Co-CEO of the Enterprise Foundation and Executive Director of ACTION-Housing Inc., a nonprofit housing development and neighborhood enhancement organization located in Pittsburgh. He was Director of the first Department of Housing for the City of Pittsburgh, and the Executive Director of the City’s Urban Redevelopment Authority, responsible for downtown and neighborhood improvement.

            Selected Publications

            Brophy, Paul C. 2013. A Market-Oriented Approach to Neighborhoods. In Revitalizing American Cities, Susan M. Wachter and Kimberly Zeuli, eds. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.

            Brophy, Paul C., and Alice Shabecoff. 2001. A Guide to Careers in Community Development. Washington, DC: Island Press.

            Nenno, Mary K., Paul Brophy, Michael Barker. 1982. Housing and Local Government. Washington, DC: International City Management Association.

            Ahlbrandt, Roger S. and Paul C. Brophy. 1975. Neighborhood Revitalization: Theory and Practice. Boston: Lexington Books.

            Faculty Fellow

            Lawrence Brown

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            Miers Busch Professor of Statistics

            About

            Lawrence Brown is the Miers Busch Professor of Statistics in the Department of Statistics at The Wharton School. His research areas include statistical decision theory, statistical inference, nonparametric function estimation, foundations of statistics, sampling theory, and empirical queuing science.

            Selected Publications

            Brown, Lawrence D., National Research Council (U.S.) Panel on the Design of the 2010 Census Program of Evaluations and Experiments. 2010. Envisioning the 2020 Census. Washington, DC: National Academies Press.

            Brown, L. D., T. J. Plewes, and M. A. Gerstein. 2005. Measuring Research and Development in the United States Economy. Washington, DC: National Academies Press.

            Brown, L. D., N. Gans, A. Mandelbaum, A. Sakov, H. Shen, S. Zeltyn, and L. H. Zhao. 2005. “Statistical Analysis of a Telephone Call Center: a Queuing Science Perspective.” Journal of American Statistical Association 100.

            Brown, L. D., T. T. Cai, and A. DasGupta. 1999. “Interval Estimation for a Binomial Proportion.” Statistical Science 16.

            Brown, L. D. and M. G. Low. 1996. “Asymptotic Equivalence of Nonparametric Regression and White Noise.” Annals of Statistics 24.

            Penn IUR Scholar

            Peter Hendee Brown

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            Urban Development Consultant; Lecturer, Humphrey School of Public Affairs, University of Minnesota

            About

            Peter Hendee Brown is an urban development consultant to public, private, and nonprofit organizations including the City of Minneapolis and Target Corporation. He teaches private sector development at the University of Minnesota’s Humphrey School of Public Affairs and he has also taught urban design and site planning.  Brown’s research program draws upon his multi-disciplinary background in architecture, planning, government administration, and real estate development, connecting his experience as a practitioner with teaching and writing about urban redevelopment from multiple viewpoints. In 2009, Brown published his acclaimed book America’s Waterfront Revival: Port Authorities and Urban Redevelopment. The book focuses on four major port-based cities in the United States, analyzes their history, and considers the challenges and opportunities of waterfront redevelopment. Brown is currently completing a book about how real estate developers think for people who study them and work with them, from planners and architects to elected officials, city staff, and members of the community.

            Selected Publications

            Brown, Peter Hendee. 2014, forthcoming. Selling Dreams:  How Real Estate Developers Think About Design, Profits, and the Community. Philadelphia, PA: The University of Pennsylvania Press.

            Brown, Peter Hendee and Peter V. Hall. 2013. “Ports and Waterfronts.” In Infrastructure Planning and Finance: A Smart and Sustainable Guide, Vicki Elmer and Adam Liegland, eds. New York: Routledge Press.

            Brown, Peter Hendee. 2013. “The Delaware River Port Authority.” In The Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia, Charlene Mires, Howard Gillette, and Randall Miller, eds. Mid-Atlantic Regional Center for the Humanities at Rutgers-Camden. Available online; Print volume to be published by The University of Pennsylvania Press (forthcoming).

            Brown, Peter Hendee. 2011. “The Diversified Waterfront and the New Port Authority.” In The Port City in the XXI Century: New Challenges in the Relationship between Port and City, Rinio Bruttomesso and Joan Alemany, eds. Venice: RETE.

            Brown, Peter Hendee. 2008. America’s Waterfront Revival: Port Authorities and Urban Redevelopment. Philadelphia, PA: The University of Pennsylvania Press.

            Faculty Fellow

            David Brownlee

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            Frances Shapiro-Weitzenhoffer Professor of 19th Century European Art

            About

            David Brownlee is the Frances Shapiro-Weitzenhoffer Professor of 19th Centurey European Art in the History of Art in the School of Arts and Sciences. He is a historian of modern architecture whose interests embrace a wide range of subjects in Europe and America, from the late 18th century to the present. Brownlee has won numerous fellowships and his work has earned three major publication prizes from the Society of Architectural Historians. He is a recipient of the University of Pennsylvania’s Lindback Award for Distinguished Teaching. 

            Selected Publications

            Brownlee, David, and Derek Gillman. 2012. The Barnes Foundation: Two Buildings, One Mission. New York: Skira Rizzoli.

            Brownlee, David, David De Long, and Kathryn Hiesinger. 2001. Out of the Ordinary: Robert Venturi, Denise Scott Brown and Associates: Architecture, Urbanism, Design. Philadelphia: Philadelphia Museum of Art.

            Thomas, George and David Brownlee. 2000. Building America’s First University: An Historical and Architectural Guide to the University of Pennsylvania. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.

            Brownlee, David. 1997. Making a Modern Classic: The Architecture of the Philadelphia Museum of Art. Philadelphia: Philadelphia Museum of Art.

            Brownlee, David B. and David G. De Long. 1991. Louis I. Kahn: In the Realm of Architecture. New York: Rizzoli International Publications.

             

            Affiliated PhD Student

            Veronica Brownstone

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            Phd Candidate, Hispanic Studies, School of Arts & Sciences, University of Pennsylvania

            About

            Veronica Brownstone is a fourth year doctoral student in Hispanic Studies at the University of Pennsylvania. Her dissertation explores how contemporary Central American cultural production deals with the current crisis of disposable labor power. Drawing on the intersections of political economy, critical race theory, and class politics, her research asks what literature and film tell us about the political textures of today’s surplus populations. Of particular interest to her work are the dynamics of the informal, service, and migrant sectors as they relate to subject formation and collectivity. Veronica holds a BA with Honors in Latin American and Caribbean Studies from McGill University. 

            Penn IUR Scholar

            Robert Buckley

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            Julien Studley Fellow, Milano School of International Affairs, The New School

            About

            Bob is the Julien Studley Fellow in the Graduate Program in International Affairs at The New School.  Previously, he was Managing Director at the Rockefeller Foundation, and Advisor at the World Bank.  His work has focused on urbanization in developing countries.  A significant part involved preparing projects and grants related to urban development issues.  He has worked in more than 55 countries and has written widely on urbanization, housing, and development issues in the popular press, such as the Financial Times, the New York Times, and the Washington Post, as well as in academic journals such as the Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Nature, the Journal of Money,Credit and Banking, and Economic Development and Cultural Change.  His most recent book, Urbanization and Economic Growth, was co-edited with Michael Spence and Patricia Annez. Buckley has also taught at Syracuse University, Johns Hopkins University, and the University of Pennsylvania—and served as the chief economist of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development.  Finally, he has been a Fulbright Scholar, awarded a Regent's Fellowship at the University of California, and been supported by the Marshall Fund, the Gates Foundation, the National Science Foundation, and the International Growth Centre of Oxford University.

            Selected Publications

            Selected Publications

            Buckley, Robert and Achilles Kallergis. 2014. Does African Urban Policy Provide a Platform for Sustained Economic Growth? In The Handbook on Cities in the Global South, S. Parnell and S. Oldfield, (eds.) New York: Routledge.

            Buckley, Robert, Patricia Annez and Michael Spence. 2009. Urbanization and Economic Growth. The World Bank on behalf of the Commission on Growth and Development, Washington D.C.

            Buckley, Robert, Glumira Karaguishiyeva, Robert Van Order, and Laura Vecvagare. March 2006. Mortgage Credit Risk in EU Countries: Constraints on Exploiting the Single Currency Market, The European Journal of Law and Economics.  

            Buckely, Robert and Jerry Kalarickal. Sept. 2005. Housing Policy in Developing Countries: Conjectures and Refutations, World Bank Research Observer.

             

            Penn IUR Scholar

            Raymond J. Burby

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            Professor Emeritus, City and Regional Planning, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

            About

            Raymond Burby is Professor Emeritus in City and Regional Planning at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, a member of the College of Fellows of the American Institute of Certified Planners, and a member of various other organizations concerned with urban planning. He has been the author or editor of fourteen books and written numerous articles, including papers published in the Journal of the American Planning Association, Public Administration Review, Journal of Planning Education and Research, and Land Economics. Burby’s research and publications encompass many topics and incorporate his work on mitigation of natural hazards, land-use and environmental planning, housing and community development, and planning processes and administration.

            Selected Publications

            Burby, Raymond J. and Peter J. May. 2009. Command or Cooperate: Rethinking Traditional Central Governments' Hazard Mitigation Policies. In Building Safer Communities 58, NATO Science for Peace and Security Series, Urbano Fra Paleo, ed. Amsterdam: IOS Press.

            Burby, Raymond J. 2006. Hurricane Katrina and the Paradoxes of Government Disaster Policy: Bringing About Wise Governmental Decisions for Hazardous Areas. The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 604(1): 171-191.

            Burby, Raymond J. 2005. Have State Comprehensive Planning Mandates Reduced Insured Losses in Natural Disasters? Natural Hazards Review, 6: 67-81.

            Nelson, Arthur C., Raymond J. Burby, Edward Feser, Casey J. Dawkins, Emil E. Malizia, and Roberto Quercia. 2004. Urban Containment and Central City Revitalization. Journal of the American Planning Association, 70: 411-425.

            Burby, Raymond J. 2003. Making Plans that Matter: Citizen Involvement and Government Action. Journal of the American Planning Association, 69(1): 33-49.

            Burby, Raymond J., Laura J. Steinberg, and Victoria Basolo. 2003. The Tenure Trap: The Vulnerability of Renters to Joint Natural and Technological Disasters. Urban Affairs Review, 39: 32-59.

            Faculty Fellow

            William Burke-White

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            Richard Perry Professor, Professor of Law; Inaugural Director, Perry World House

            School/Department

            Areas of Interest

              About

              William Burke-White is Richard Perry Professor and Professor of Law at Penn Law and Inaugural Director of Perry World House. An expert on international law and global governance, Burke-White served in the Obama Administration from 2009-2011 on Secretary Clinton’s Policy Planning Staff, providing the Secretary direct policy advice on multilateral diplomacy and international institutions. He was principal drafter of the Quadrennial Diplomacy and Development Review (QDDR), Secretary Clinton’s hallmark foreign policy and institutional reform effort. Burke-White has written extensively in the fields of international law and institutions, with a focus on international criminal and international economic law. His work has addressed issues of post-conflict justice; the International Criminal Court; international human rights, and international arbitration. His current research explores gaps in the global governance system and the challenges of international legal regulation in a world of rising powers and divergent interests. In 2008 he received the A. Leo Levin Award and in 2007 the Robert A. Gorman award for Excellence in Teaching.

              Selected Publications

              Burke-White, William. 2015. “Power Shifts in International Law: Structural Realignment and Substantive Pluralism.” Harvard International Law Journal 56(1): 1-79.
              Burke-White, William. 2014. “Crimea and the International Legal Order,” 56 Survival 65 (2014).
              Burke-White, William. 2011. “The Adoption of the Responsibility to Protect.” In The Responsibility to Protect the Promise of Stopping Mass Atrocities in our Time. edited by Jared Genser and Irwin Cotler. Oxford.
              Burke-White, William and Andreas von Staden. 2010. “Private Litigation in a Public Law Sphere: The Standard of Review in Investor State Arbitration.” 35 Yale International Law Journal 283.
              Burke-White, William. 2010. “Reframing Positive Complementarity: Reflections on the First Decade and Insights from the US Federal Criminal Justice System.” In The International Criminal Court and Complementarity: From Theory to Practice. Cambridge University Press.

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