People

Penn IUR is affiliated with more than 200 experts in the field of urbanism. Its Faculty Fellows program identifies faculty at the University of Pennsylvania with a demonstrated interest in urban research; the Penn IUR Scholars program identifies urban scholars outside of Penn; and the Penn IUR Fellows program identifies expert urban practitioners. Together, these programs foster a community of scholars and encourage cross-disciplinary collaboration.

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Emerging Scholar

Seung Ah Byun

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Senior Planner for Water Resources, Brandywine Conservancy’s Municipal Assistance Program

About

Seung Ah Byun is the Senior Planner for Water Resources with the Brandywine Conservancy’s Municipal Assistance Program. Her responsibilities involve developing and managing innovative stormwater management practices, green infrastructure tools, and source water protection projects at the watershed and local scales. She also provides technical expertise to municipalities on compliance with state and federal water quality regulations such as MS4 and TMDL requirements. Previously, Seung Ah was a water resources engineer at CDM Smith, primarily consulting for the City of Philadelphia’s Office of Watersheds and CSO Program.  Seung Ah received her doctorate and a master’s degree from the University of Pennsylvania, School of Design’s Department of City and Regional Planning. She also obtained a master’s degree in environmental engineering from Drexel University and a bachelor’s of science in systems engineering from the University of Pennsylvania. Seung Ah is a licensed Professional Engineer and is a LEED Accredited Professional. 

Selected Publications

Byun, Seung Ah. James T. Smullen, Mark Maimone, Robert E. Dickinson, and Christopher S. Crockett. (2003) “Overcoming Obstacles for the Application of SWMM to Large-scale Watersheds.” Practical Modeling of Urban Water Systems, Monograph 11. Edited by James, William. CHI, Guelph, Ontario, Canada.

Penn IUR Scholar

Daniel Campo

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Associate Professor, Department of Graduate Built Environment Studies, School of Architecture and Planning, Morgan State University

About

Daniel Campo is Associate Professor in the School of Architecture and Planning at Morgan State University in Baltimore. Campo’s research explores informal, insurgent and do-it-yourself development practices and their intersection with professional urban planning, design and preservation. His book, The Accidental Playground: Brooklyn Waterfront Narratives of the Undesigned and Unplanned was named by the New York Times as one of a ten book “urban canon” of suggested reading for the New York City Mayor. Campo has also published articles on a range of urban topics, including public space studies, downtown and waterfront revitalization, historic preservation, history of the built environment, shrinking cities, and urban arts and culture. His current research examines sub-professional and grassroots efforts to preserve, reuse and enjoy iconic but decaying industrial complexes across the North American Rustbelt. 

Selected Publications

Campo, Daniel, “Iconic Eyesores: Exploring Do-it-yourself Preservation and Civic Improvement at Abandoned Train Stations in Buffalo and Detroit,” Journal of Urbanism 7-4 (2014).

Campo, Daniel, “Postindustrial Futures: Adaptive Reuse versus ‘as is’ Preservation,” in Schwarz, Terry, ed., Historic Preservation and Urban Change (Cleveland: Kent State University, 2014).

Campo, Daniel, The Accidental Playground: Brooklyn Waterfront Narratives of the Undesigned and Unplanned (New York: Fordham University Press, 2013).

Ryan, Brent D. and Daniel Campo, “Autotopia’s End: The Decline and Fall of Detroit’s Automotive Manufacturing Landscape,” Journal of Planning History 12-2 (2013).

Campo, Daniel, “In the Footsteps of the Federal Writers’ Project: Revisiting the Workshop of the World,” Landscape Journal 29-2 (2010).

Campo, Daniel and Brent D. Ryan, “The Entertainment Zone: Unplanned Nightlife and the Revitalization of the American Downtown,” Journal of Urban Design 13-3 (2008).

Faculty Fellow

Carolyn Cannuscio

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Assistant Professor

About

Carolyn Cannuscio is Assistant Professor in the Department of Family Medicine and Community Health at the Perelman School of Medicine. She is a social epidemiologist with substantial experience studying aging, chronic disease, health disparities, and material hardship. Her current work concentrates in two ares: the material and social causes of later-life health disparities, and the preventable causes of urban health disparities. To advance the use of visual methods in health disparities research, she collaborates with David Asch, Eve Weiss, and a strong interdisciplinary team of student research assistants. 

Selected Publications

Hailu, T., C.C. Cannuscio, R. Dupuis, and J. Karlawish. 2017. “A typical day with mild cognitive impairment.” American Journal of Public Health 107(6): 927-928. 

Morgan, A.U.; R. Dupuis, E.D. Whiteman, B. D'Alonzo, and C.C. Cannuscio. 2017. “Our Doors Are Open to Everybody: Public Libraries as Common Ground for Public Health.” Journal of Urban Health-Bulletin of the New York Academy of Medicine 94(1).

Golinkoff, A., Moriah Hall; Willie Baronet, Carolyn Cannuscio, and Rosemary Frasso. 2016. “Cardboard Commentary: A Qualitative Analysis of the Signs From America’s Streets.” American Journal of Public Health 106(11).

Penn IUR Scholar

Anthony P. Carnevale

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Director and Research Professor, Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce

Areas of Interest

    About

    Anthony P. Carnevale is Director and Research Professor at the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce, and an internationally renowned authority and scholar on education, training and employment. Earlier in his career, Carnevale founded and became President of the Institute for Workplace Learning, where he remained for ten years. Carnevale also was Director of Human Resource and Employment Studies at the Committee for Economic Development where he was appointed by President Clinton to Chair the National Commission on Employment Policy. Carnevale co-authored the principal affidavit in Rodriguez v. San Antonio, a national Supreme Court action to reform unequal tax burdens and education benefits. This historic case resulted in significant fiscal reforms in a wide variety of important states, and remains prevalent to this day.

    Selected Publications

    Carnevale, Anthony P., Nicole Smith, and Jeff Strohl. 2012. Postsecondary Education and Economic Opportunity. In Preparing Today’s Students for Tomorrow’s Jobs in Metropolitan America, 93-120. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.

    Carnevale, Anthony P. and Susan Carol Stone. 1995. The American Mosaic: An In-Depth Report on the Future of Diversity at Work. New York: McGraw-Hill.

    Carnevale, Anthony P. and Leila J. Gainer and Ann S. Meltzer. 1990 (1st ed). Workplace Basics: The Essential Skills Employers Want. Jossey-Bass Business and Management Series. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

    Carnevale, Anthony P. 1991 (1st ed). America and New Economy: How New Competitive Standards are Radically Changing American Workplaces. Jossey-Bass Business and Management Series. New York: Wiley.

    Penn IUR Scholar

    Robert Cervero

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    Friesen Chair of Urban Studies, Professor of City and Regional Planning, College of Environmental Design, University of California – Berkeley

    About

    Robert Cervero is Friesen Chair of Urban Studies and Professor of City and Regional Planning in the College of Environmental Design at the University of California – Berkeley. He is also the Director of both the Institute of Urban and Regional Development and the University of California Transportation Center. Cervero’s research and teaching focus on transportation planning, transportation and land use, infrastructure planning, and international development. His research on transportation focuses on how new urban developments and transformations impact travel behavior. In 2004, Cervero was the first-ever recipient of the Dale Prize for Excellence in Urban Planning Research. He has won the Article of The Year award for two separate articles from the Journal of the American Planning Association.

    Selected Publications

    Cervero, Robert. 1998 (1st ed). The Transit Metropolis: A Global Inquiry. Washington, DC: Island Press.

    Ewing, Reid and Robert Cervero. 2010. Travel and the Built Environment: A Meta-Analysis. Journal of the American Planning Association, 76(3): 265-294.

    Cervero, Robert. 2013 (reprint edition). Suburban Gridlock. New Brunswick, NJ: Center for Urban Policy Research.

    Cervero, Robert. 1997. Paratransit in America: Redefining Mass Transportation. New York: Prager.

    Faculty Fellow

    Camille Zubrinsky Charles

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    Professor of Sociology; Walter H. and Leonore C. Anneberg Professor in the Social Sciences

    Chair, Department of Africana Studies

    About

    Camille Z. Charles is Walter H. and Leonore C. Anneberg Professor in the Social Sciences, Professor of Sociology, Africana Studies, and Education, and Director of the Africana Studies in the School of Arts and Sciences. Her research interests are in the areas of urban inequality, racial attitudes and intergroup relations, racial residential segregation, minorities in higher education, and racial identity. 

    Selected Publications

    Kramer, Rory A., Brianna Remster, and Camille Z. Charles. In Press. “Black Lives and Police Tactics Matter.” Contexts, Summer: 20-25. (https://contexts.org/articles/black-lives-and-police-tactics-matter/).

    Charles, Camille Z, Rory Kramer, Kimberly Torres, Rachelle Brunn-Bevel. 2015. “Intragroup Heterogeneity and Blackness: Effects of Racial Classification, Immigrant Origins, Social Class, and Social Context on the Racial Identity of Elite College Students.” Race and Social Problems 7(4).
    Kramer, Rory, Ruth Burke, sand Camille Z. Charles. 2015. “When Change Doesn’t Matter: Racial Identity (In)consistency and Adolescent Well-being.” Sociology of Race and Ethnicity 1(2).

    Charles, Camille Z., Douglas S. Massey, Mary J. Fischer, and Margarita Mooney, with Brooke A. Cunningham, and Gniesha Y. Dinwiddie. 2009. Taming the River: Negotiating the Academic, Financial and Social Currents in Selective Colleges and Universities. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.

    Charles, Camille Zubrinsky. 2006. Won’t You Be My Neighbor? Race, Class and Residence in Los Angeles. New York: Russell Sage. 

    Emerging Scholar

    Shahana Chattaraj

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    Visiting Professor, Urban Studies Program and Department of City and Regional Planning, School of Design, University of Pennsylvania

      About

      Shahana Chattaraj is a Research Fellow in Urban Studies and Planning at Sheffield University. She was previously a Post-Doctoral Scholar in Global Cities at University of Pennsylvania's Lauder Institute. Prior to her doctoral studies, Chattaraj worked with the United Nations Population Fund and the World Bank as well as community development organization in New Delhi. She is currently working on a manuscript based on her dissertation, which compares urban restructuring in the context of globalization in Mumbai and Shanghai, with a focus on the role of the sub-national state. Chattaraj’s research interests are located broadly at the intersection of globalization and economic development and urbanization in emerging economies, with a particular interest in state-business-civil society relations in globalizing cities, the informal economy, and emerging patterns of socio-economic and socio-spatial inequality in urban centers. Her areas of expertise include globalization and urban change, political economy of development, urban governance and politics, and urbanization in developing regions. 

      Selected Publications

      Wachter, Susan, Shahana Chattaraj, and Eugénie Birch. Forthcoming. Informal Real-Estate Markets.

      Chattaraj, Shahana. Forthcoming. Cities in Globalization. The Lauder Institute.

      Chattaraj, Shahana. 2012. Shanghai Dreams: Urban Restructuring in Globalizing Mumbai (PhD Dissertation, Princeton University).

      Emerging Scholar

      Mengke Chen

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      Doctoral Candidate in City and Regional Planning, University of Pennsylvania

      About

      Mengke Chen recently received her PhD in City and Regional Planning at PennDesign. Her research interests include economic development, transportation investment (high-speed rail investment), and transportation and land use. Chen is particularly interested with regards to the impact of high speed rail development on urban economics in Chinese cities, as well as in Europe. The profound societal and economic impact of high-speed rail in contemporary society also constitutes a chief focus of her research. Chen received her Master’s in Urban Spatial Analytics from the University of Pennsylvania and her B.S. and G.I.S. from Peking University in Beijing, China.

      Selected Publications

      Chen, Mengke and Matthias N. Sweet. “Does regional travel time unreliability influence mode choice?” Transportation. Springer Science+Business Media, LLC. 2011.

      Emerging Scholar

      Caroline Cheong

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      Assistant Professor, Department of History, University of Central Florida

      About

      Caroline Cheong is an assistant professor in the History Department at the University of Central Florida. Her research focuses on the relationship between urban heritage conservation and economic development, values-based conservation management, conservation economics and poverty reduction. She earned her PhD from the University of Pennsylvania in City and Regional Planning, her MS in Historic Preservation from the University of Pennsylvania and her BS in Anthropology from the University of Chicago. She was a US/ICOMOS International Exchange Intern in Al Houson, Jordan and a Graduate Intern at the Getty Conservation Institute where she evaluated the challenges and opportunities facing historic cities.  Previously, Caroline was the Director of Research for Heritage Strategies International and PlaceEconomics through which she published numerous research reports and professional publications focusing on the economic impacts of historic preservation with Donovan Rypkema.

      Selected Publications

      Macdonald, Susan and Caroline Cheong. The Role of Public-Private Partnerships in Conserving Heritage Buildings, Sites and Historic Urban Areas: A Literature Review. Los Angeles, CA: Getty Publications, 2014

      Cheong, Caroline. Instruments for urban regeneration: Mixed-capital companies. (2014). Manuscript submitted for publication. Prepared for Eduardo Rojas.

      Cheong, Caroline. Creative Cities and Place. (2013). Manuscript submitted for publication. Prepared for Donovan Rypkema, Erasmus University and the Ministry of Education, Culture and Science of the Netherlands.

      Cheong, Caroline. Cruise Ship Tourism: Issues and Trends. Prepared for the World Monuments Fund for “Harboring Tourism: A Symposium on Cruise Ships in Historic Port Communities,” 2012.

      Penn IUR Scholar

      Carolyn Chernoff

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      Visiting Assistant Professor of Sociology, Skidmore College

      About

      Carolyn Chernoff is a Visiting Assistant Professor of Sociology at Skidmore College. She is an urban and cultural sociologist specializing in the role of culture in reproducing and transforming urban inequality. While a doctoral student at the University of Pennsylvania, Chernoff received the 2013 Arnold Award for Outstanding Contribution by a Doctoral Student from the Graduate School of Education, the Dean's Scholarship (GSE), and served as a 2012-2013 Graduate Fellow for Teaching Excellence at Penn's Center for Teaching and Learning. Chernoff’s work focuses on cities, arts, and social change, particularly on the level of social interaction and the production of community. Her dissertation, “Imagining the City: Ritual and Conflict in the Urban Art Democracy,” is based on ethnographic research conducted over a period of eight years at three different community-arts organizations in a major Mid-Atlantic city. 

      Selected Publications

      Chernoff, Carolyn. 2013. Spelling It Out: Difference and Diversity in Public Conversation. Michigan Sociological Review, 27.

      Chernoff, Carolyn. 2013. “Conflict Theory in Education.” In Sociology of Education, James Ainsworth and Geoffrey J. Golson, eds. Sage Publications.

      Chernoff, Carolyn. 2013. “Waldorf Education.” In Sociology of Education, James Ainsworth and Geoffrey J. Golson, eds. Sage Publications.

      Chernoff, Carolyn. 2010. Objectifying Measures: The Dominance of High-Stakes Testing and the Politics of Schooling – By Amanda Walker Johnson. Anthropology & Education Quarterly, 41: 212–213.

      Chernoff, Carolyn.  2009. On Culture, Art, and Experience. Perspectives on Urban Education (Penn GSE electronic journal), 6(2): 77-78.

      Emerging Scholar

      Ben Chrisinger

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      Pos-Doctoral Research Fellow, School of Medicine, Stanford University

      About

      Ben Chrisinger is a postdoctoral research fellow with Stanford University’s School of Medicine.  He is committed to research that helps explain relationships between the built environment and health, especially health disparities.  His dissertation research examined efforts to open new supermarkets in underserved areas ("food deserts") by considering development processes, store-level outcomes, and community and customer experiences. With his former advisor, Dr. Amy Hillier, Ben is helping analyze interactions between the food environment and healthy purchasing within the federal Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), and has also written about the role of SNAP in community development.

      Ben completed his Ph.D. in City and Regional Planning at the University of Pennsylvania in 2015.  He is a former fellow with the Emerging Leaders in Science and Society (ELISS) Program at the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and Graduate Research Fellow with the National Science Foundation.  He received his undergraduate and graduate degrees in Urban and Environmental Planning from the University of Virginia.  

      Selected Publications

      Chrisinger, B. (2015). Reconsidering the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program as Community Development. Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, 47(3): 273-277. DOI:10.1016/j.jneb.2014.10.005. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25467214.

      Chrisinger, B. Changing food stamp distribution to attract new grocers. The Baltimore Sun. 22 July 2015. http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/opinion/oped/bs-ed-food-desert-20150722-story.html

      Brinkley, C., Chrisinger, B., and A. Hillier (2013). Tradition of Healthy Food Access in Low-Income Neighborhoods: Price and Variety of Curbside Produce Vending Compared to Conventional Retailers. Journal of Agriculture, Food Systems, and Community Development, 4(1):155-169. http://dx.doi.org/10.5304/jafscd.2013.041.011. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4274600/.

      Chrisinger, B. “Food Stamps and Place: New Cuts Could Dry Up Food Desert Improvements.” Planetizen. December 2013. http://www.planetizen.com/node/66580

      Chrisinger, B., & S. Golden (forthcoming). Urban Agriculture & Health: What Is Known, What Is Possible. In, Morales, A., and Dawson, J. (Eds.) Cities of Farmers: Problems, Possibilities, and Processes of Producing Food in Cities. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press. (forthcoming).

      Chrisinger, B. “Planner on Wheels: Perspectives on Affordable Housing in America, by Bicycle.” American Planning Association's Planning Magazine. November 2012. https://www.planning.org/planning/2012/nov/planneronwheels.htm

      Fellow

      James Cloar

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      Downtown Advisory Services

      Areas of Interest

        About

        Jim Cloar is an expert on downtown development and non-profit management structures. His recent projects include consulting for Wichita, KS, Tulsa, OK and Burlington VT on their downtown management structures. He is on the Board of Commissioners of the Tampa Housing Authority, the Board of Directors of the National Civic League and the Henry B. Plant Museum.  Cloar previously served as the President and CEO of the Partnership for Downtown St. Louis and chaired the City’s Downtown Economic Stimulus Authority. He also headed downtown associations in Dallas, TX and Tampa, FL. Cloar served nineteen years on the Board of Directors of the International Downtown Association (IDA) and is a former Chair of the organization. He has also been the President of the Urban Land Institute (ULI) and is a former Chair of ULI’s Public-Private Partnership Council. He is the recipient of several awards, including the St. Louis Mayor’s “Quality of Life” Award, and the Dan E. Sweat “Lifetime Achievement in Downtown Leadership” Award” from the IDA. 

        Selected Publications

        Cloar, James A. 1990. Centralized Retail Management: New Strategies for Downtown. Washington, DC: Urban Land Institute. 

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