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Through the Faculty Fellows Program, the Institute fosters an environment that encourages cross-disciplinary connections and nurtures a collaborative spirit among faculty across the 12 schools. This program identifies faculty with a demonstrated interest in urban research and provides research and communication services.

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Faculty Fellow

Domenic Vitiello

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Associate Professor

Assistant Chair

About

Domenic Vitiello is Associate Professor and Assistant Chair in the Department of City and Regional Planning in the School of Design. He researches the history and contemporary practice of community and economic development; immigrant communities; and urban agriculture and food system planning. His recent and current projects focus on immigration and civil society in Philadelphia, including a book titled The Sanctuary City that examines Central American, Southeast Asian, Liberian, Arab, and Mexican immigration since the 1970s; urban agriculture and poverty in the global North and South, including comparative research on the community economic development impacts of urban farming and gardening around the world, and a book on the social impacts of community gardening in Camden, Chicago, and Philadelphia; and the planned destruction and preservation of Chinatowns in the U.S. and Canada since c.1900.

Selected Publications

Vitiello, Domenic and Thomas J. Sugrue, editors. 2017. Immigration and Metropolitan Revitalization in the United States. Philadelphia, PA: University of Pennsylvania Press.

Vitiello, Domenic and Arthur Acolin. 2017. “Institutional Ecosystems of Housing Support in Chinese, Southeast Asian, and African Philadelphia.” Journal of Planning Education and Research 37(2): 195-206.

Acolin, Arthur and Domenic Vitiello. 2017. "Who Owns Chinatown: Neighborhood Change and Preservation in Boston and Philadelphia" Urban Studies.

Vitiello, Domenic. 2017. “Infrastructure: Lifelines, Mobility, and Urban Development.” In Planning History Handbook, edited by Carola Hein. Routledge.

Vitiello, Domenic, Jeane Ann Grisso, Rebecca Fischman, and K. Leah Whiteside. 2015. “From Commodity Surplus to Food Justice: Food Banks and Local Agriculture in the United States.” Agriculture and Human Values 32(3): 419-430.

x

Associate Professor

Assistant Chair

About

Domenic Vitiello is Associate Professor and Assistant Chair in the Department of City and Regional Planning in the School of Design. He researches the history and contemporary practice of community and economic development; immigrant communities; and urban agriculture and food system planning. His recent and current projects focus on immigration and civil society in Philadelphia, including a book titled The Sanctuary City that examines Central American, Southeast Asian, Liberian, Arab, and Mexican immigration since the 1970s; urban agriculture and poverty in the global North and South, including comparative research on the community economic development impacts of urban farming and gardening around the world, and a book on the social impacts of community gardening in Camden, Chicago, and Philadelphia; and the planned destruction and preservation of Chinatowns in the U.S. and Canada since c.1900.

Selected Publications

Vitiello, Domenic and Thomas J. Sugrue, editors. 2017. Immigration and Metropolitan Revitalization in the United States. Philadelphia, PA: University of Pennsylvania Press.

Vitiello, Domenic and Arthur Acolin. 2017. “Institutional Ecosystems of Housing Support in Chinese, Southeast Asian, and African Philadelphia.” Journal of Planning Education and Research 37(2): 195-206.

Acolin, Arthur and Domenic Vitiello. 2017. "Who Owns Chinatown: Neighborhood Change and Preservation in Boston and Philadelphia" Urban Studies.

Vitiello, Domenic. 2017. “Infrastructure: Lifelines, Mobility, and Urban Development.” In Planning History Handbook, edited by Carola Hein. Routledge.

Vitiello, Domenic, Jeane Ann Grisso, Rebecca Fischman, and K. Leah Whiteside. 2015. “From Commodity Surplus to Food Justice: Food Banks and Local Agriculture in the United States.” Agriculture and Human Values 32(3): 419-430.

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