People

Through the Faculty Fellows Program, the Institute fosters an environment that encourages cross-disciplinary connections and nurtures a collaborative spirit among faculty across the 12 schools. This program identifies faculty with a demonstrated interest in urban research and provides research and communication services.

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Faculty Fellow

Jessie Handbury

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Assistant Professor of Real Estate

About

Jessie Handbury is Assistant Professor of Real Estate at The Wharton School and a Faculty Research Fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER). Her research interests lie at the intersection of urban economics, trade, and industrial organization. Her recent articles use detailed data on retail sales to characterize how product prices and availability vary across U.S. cities and to measure the implications of this variation on household living costs. Her current research examines spatial and socio-economic disparities in the availability and consumption of food products. This work, supported by the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the Wharton Social Impact Initiative, seeks to understand the roles that differentials in price sensitivity, nutritional preferences, and retail access each play in explaining socio-economic disparities in nutrition. 

Selected Publications

Handbury, Jessie, Ilya Rahkovsky, and Molly Schnell2015. “What Drives Nutritional Disparities? Retail Access and Food Purchases Across the Socioeconomic Spectrum.” NBER Working Paper Series Volume w21126.

Handbury, Jessie, and David E. Weinstein. 2014. “Goods prices and availability in cities.” The Review of Economic Studies 82(1): 258-296.

Handbury, Jessie. 2014. “Are poor cities cheap for everyone? Non-homotheticity and the cost of living across us cities." Zell-Lurie working papers.

 

x

Assistant Professor of Real Estate

About

Jessie Handbury is Assistant Professor of Real Estate at The Wharton School and a Faculty Research Fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER). Her research interests lie at the intersection of urban economics, trade, and industrial organization. Her recent articles use detailed data on retail sales to characterize how product prices and availability vary across U.S. cities and to measure the implications of this variation on household living costs. Her current research examines spatial and socio-economic disparities in the availability and consumption of food products. This work, supported by the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the Wharton Social Impact Initiative, seeks to understand the roles that differentials in price sensitivity, nutritional preferences, and retail access each play in explaining socio-economic disparities in nutrition. 

Selected Publications

Handbury, Jessie, Ilya Rahkovsky, and Molly Schnell2015. “What Drives Nutritional Disparities? Retail Access and Food Purchases Across the Socioeconomic Spectrum.” NBER Working Paper Series Volume w21126.

Handbury, Jessie, and David E. Weinstein. 2014. “Goods prices and availability in cities.” The Review of Economic Studies 82(1): 258-296.

Handbury, Jessie. 2014. “Are poor cities cheap for everyone? Non-homotheticity and the cost of living across us cities." Zell-Lurie working papers.

 

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