People

Penn IUR is affiliated with more than 200 experts in the field of urbanism. Its Faculty Fellows program identifies faculty at the University of Pennsylvania with a demonstrated interest in urban research; the Penn IUR Scholars program identifies urban scholars outside of Penn; and the Penn IUR Fellows program identifies expert urban practitioners. Together, these programs foster a community of scholars and encourage cross-disciplinary collaboration.

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Affiliated PhD Student

Jane Abell

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Doctoral Candidate in Anthropology, University of Pennsylvania

About

Jane Lief Abell is a second year doctoral student in Anthropology at the University of Pennsylvania. Her research explores Islam in the United States, with a particular focus on how race and religion inform relations among "native" and immigrant Muslim groups. Currently, she is working with Al-Bustan Seeds of Culture, an Arabic language and arts organization based in West Philly, and conducting fieldwork in Northeast Philadelphia. Prior to entering graduate school, Jane held several research and editorial positions at the Center for Middle East Studies at Harvard University; Harvard Divinity School; the Berkman Center for Internet & Society; the Consortium on Gender, Security, and Human Rights; and Law People Management, LLC. Jane holds a BA with High Honors in Sociology & Anthropology and Islamic Studies from Swarthmore College. 

 

Faculty Fellow

David Brownlee

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Frances Shapiro-Weitzenhoffer Professor, Chair of the Graduate Group in the History of Art

School/Department

Areas of Interest

    About

    David Brownlee is Frances Shapiro-Weitzenhoffer Professor and Chair of the Graduate Group in the History of Art in the School of Arts and Sciences. He is a historian of modern architecture whose interests embrace a wide range of subjects in Europe and America, from the late eighteenth century to the present. Brownlee has won numerous fellowships, and his work has earned three major publication prizes from the Society of Architectural Historians. He is a recipient of the University of Pennsylvania’s Lindback Award for Distinguished Teaching. 

    Selected Publications

    Brownlee, David, and Derek Gillman. 2012. The Barnes Foundation: Two Buildings, One Mission. New York: Skira Rizzoli.

    Brownlee, David, David De Long, and Kathryn Hiesinger. 2001. Out of the Ordinary: Robert Venturi, Denise Scott Brown and Associates: Architecture, Urbanism, Design. Philadelphia: Philadelphia Museum of Art.

    Thomas, George and David Brownlee. 2000. Building America’s First University: An Historical and Architectural Guide to the University of Pennsylvania. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.

    Brownlee, David. 1997. Making a Modern Classic: The Architecture of the Philadelphia Museum of Art. Philadelphia: Philadelphia Museum of Art.

    Brownlee, David B. and David G. De Long. 1991. Louis I. Kahn: In the Realm of Architecture. New York: Rizzoli International Publications.

    Brownlee, David. 1989. Building the City Beautiful: The Benjamin Franklin Parkway and the Philadelphia Museum of Art. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press. 

    Penn IUR Scholar

    Carolyn Chernoff

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    Visiting Assistant Professor of Sociology, Skidmore College

    About

    Carolyn Chernoff is a Visiting Assistant Professor of Sociology at Skidmore College. She is an urban and cultural sociologist specializing in the role of culture in reproducing and transforming urban inequality. While a doctoral student at the University of Pennsylvania, Chernoff received the 2013 Arnold Award for Outstanding Contribution by a Doctoral Student from the Graduate School of Education, the Dean's Scholarship (GSE), and served as a 2012-2013 Graduate Fellow for Teaching Excellence at Penn's Center for Teaching and Learning. Chernoff’s work focuses on cities, arts, and social change, particularly on the level of social interaction and the production of community. Her dissertation, “Imagining the City: Ritual and Conflict in the Urban Art Democracy,” is based on ethnographic research conducted over a period of eight years at three different community-arts organizations in a major Mid-Atlantic city. 

    Selected Publications

    Chernoff, Carolyn. 2013, forthcoming. Spelling It Out: Difference and Diversity in Public Conversation. Michigan Sociological Review, 27.

    Chernoff, Carolyn. 2013. “Conflict Theory in Education.” In Sociology of Education, James Ainsworth and Geoffrey J. Golson, eds. Sage Publications.

    Chernoff, Carolyn. 2013. “Waldorf Education.” In Sociology of Education, James Ainsworth and Geoffrey J. Golson, eds. Sage Publications.

    Chernoff, Carolyn. 2010. Objectifying Measures: The Dominance of High-Stakes Testing and the Politics of Schooling – By Amanda Walker Johnson. Anthropology & Education Quarterly, 41: 212–213.

    Chernoff, Carolyn.  2009. On Culture, Art, and Experience. Perspectives on Urban Education (Penn GSE electronic journal), 6(2): 77-78.

    Emerging Scholar

    Meagan Ehlenz

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    Assistant Professor, School of Geography and Urban Planning, Arizona State University

    About

    Meagan Ehlenz is an assistant professor at Arizona State University's School of Geography and Urban Planning. Her major fields of study include urban revitalization and community development, with specializations in the role of anchor institutions in urban places and mechanisms for building community wealth. Prior to joining ASU's faculty, Ehlenz was a Research Associate at the Penn Institute for Urban Research. In this capacity, she developed a set of case studies for Penn IUR's Anchor Institution Roundtable (PRAI), The Power of Eds & Meds: Urban Universities Investing in Neighborhood Revitalization and Innovation. She was also a Lincoln Institute of Land Policy C. Lowell Harriss dissertation fellow. Previously, Ehlenz worked as a planning consultant in Southeastern Wisconsin and as a senior planner for the City of Milwaukee’s Department of City Development. She holds a PhD in City and Regional Planning from the Department of City and Regional Planning at the University of Pennsylvania, a Master in Urban Planning from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, and a Bachelor in Environmental Design from the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay.

    Selected Publications

    Ehlenz, Meagan M. "Neighborhood Revitalization and the Anchor Institution: Assessing the Impact of the University of Pennsylvania's West Philadelphia Initiatives on University City." Urban Affairs Review (forthcoming).

    Ehlenz, Meagan M. and Eugénie L. Birch with Brian Agness.  The Power of Eds and Meds: Urban Universities Investing in Neighborhood Revitalization & Innovation. Philadelphia: Penn Institute for Urban Research, 2014.

    Ehlenz, Meagan M. “Managing the Land Access Paradox in the Urbanising World.” Critical Housing Analysis 1, no. 1 (2014). 

    Ehlenz, Meagan M. Community Land Trusts and Limited Equity Cooperatives: A Marriage of Affordable Homeownership Models? Working Paper. Cambridge, MA: Lincoln Institute of Land Policy, 2014.

    Ehlenz, Meagan M. Review of New Deal Ruins: Race, Economic Justice, and Public Housing Policy by Edward G. Goetz (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 2013). Journal of Urban Affairs 36, no. 3 (2014): 540-541.

    Penn IUR Scholar

    Richard Florida

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    Director of Business and Creativity, The Martin Prosperity Institute, Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto

    Global Research Professor, New York University

    Areas of Interest

      About

      Richard Florida is Director of the Martin Prosperity Institute at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management and a Global Research Professor at New York University. He previously taught at Carnegie Mellon University and George Mason University.  Florida is one of the world’s leading public intellectuals on economic competitiveness, demographic trends, and cultural and technological innovation. He is also Senior Editor at The Atlantic, where he co-founded and serves as Editor-at-Large for The Atlantic Cities, as well as the Creative Class Group. He is the author of several best-selling books including his award-winning book The Rise of the Creative Class.

      Selected Publications

      Florida, Richard. 2010. The Great Reset: How the Post-Crash Economy Will Change the Way We Live and Work. New York: HarperCollins.

      Florida, Richard. 2009. Who’s Your City?: How the Creative Economy Is Making Where to Live the Most Important Decision of Your Life. New York: Basic Books.

      Florida, Richard. 2005. The Flight of the Creative Class: The New Global Competition for Talent. New York: HarperCollins.

      Florida, Richard. 2002. The Rise of the Creative Class. New York: Basic Books.

      Faculty Fellow

      Vivian Gadsden

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      William T. Carter Professor of Child Development and Education; Director, National Center on Fathers and Families

      Associate Director, National Center on Adult Literacy

      School/Department

      Areas of Interest

        About

        Vivian Gadsden is the William T. Carter Professor of Child Development and Education, Director of the National Center on Fathers and Families, and Associate Director of the National Center on Adult Literacy at the Graduate School of Education. Her research interests focus on cultural and social factors affecting learning and literacy across the life-course and within families, particularly those at the greatest risk for academic and social vulnerability and her writing focuses on intergenerational learning. Her current projects include a longitudinal study on intergenerational learning within African-American and Latino families; a study of parent engagement in children’s early literacy; a study with young fathers in urban settings; a study on literacy, education, and health; a policy study on incarcerated parents and their families; and a study of children of incarcerated parents. She is participating in an NICHD-funded project (Dr. John Fantuzzo, principal investigator) on the development of an integrated Head Start curriculum.

        Selected Publications

        Gadsden, V. L. and P. Genty, eds. Forthcoming. Incarcerated Parents and Their Children. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.

        Wortham, S. and V.L. Gadsden. 2009. The Complexities of “Similarity” in Research Interviewing. In Investigating Classroom Interaction: Methodologies in Action, K. Kumpulainen and M. Cesar, eds.

        Gadsden, V. L. 2008. The Arts and Education: Knowledge Generation, Pedagogy, and the Discourse of Learning. Review of Research in Education 32: 29-61.

        Faculty Fellow

        David Grazian

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        Associate Professor of Sociology

        About

        David Grazian is Associate Professor of Sociology in the Department of Sociology in the School of Arts and Sciences. His research areas include sociology of culture, popular culture and mass media, urban sociology, symbolic interaction, race and ethnicity, ethnographic methods and social theory. Grazian teaches courses on popular culture, mass media and the arts, cities and urban sociology, social interaction and public behavior, and ethnographic methods. In his research he employs a variety of ethnographic and other qualitative methods to study the production and consumption of commercial entertainment in the urban milieu.. He recently received a fellowship from the Institute for Advanced Studies (IAS) in Princeton, New Jersey to pursue his research full time during the 2013-2014 academic year. During his sabbatical year of residence, Grazian will complete a book manuscript on metropolitan zoos as repositories of culture as well as nature. The book is tentatively titled Where the Wild Things Aren’t: City Zoos and the Culture of Nature.

        Selected Publications

        Grazian, David. 2010. Mix It Up: Popular Culture, Mass Media, and Society. W.W. Norton.

        Grazian, David. 2008. On the Make: The Hustle of Urban Nightlife. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

        Grazian, David. 2003. Blue Chicago: The Search for Authenticity in Urban Blues Clubs. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

        Grazian, David. A Digital Revolution? 2005. A Reassessment of New Media and Cultural Production in the Digital Age. Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science 597: 209-222. 

        Grazian, David. 2004. Opportunities for Ethnography in the Sociology of Music. Poetics: Journal of Empirical Research on Culture, the Media and the Arts 32(3-4): 197-210.

        Faculty Fellow

        David Young Kim

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        Assistant Professor of Art History

        About

        David Young Kim is Assistant Professor in the Department of History of Art in the School of Arts and Sciences. He teaches Southern Renaissance art, with a focus on the issues of cross-cultural exchange, geography, art literature, and material culture. Before joining the Penn faculty in 2013, he was a visiting faculty member at the Universidade Federal de São Paulo and a postdoctoral faculty fellow at the University of Zurich in Switzerland. He has published essays on topics such as cartographic images of the New World, cross-cultural exchange in the Mediterranean, and architectural representation. His next project, provisionally called The Texture of Painting, will investigate the connections between material surface, craft, and the decorative arts in the works of Northern Italian artists.

        Selected Publications

        Kim, David. 2014, forthcoming. The Traveling Artist in the Italian Renaissance.

        Kim, David Y, ed. 2014. Matters of Weight: Force, Gravity, and Aesthetics in the Early Modern Period. Berlin: Imorde.

        Kim, David Y. 2011. The Horror of Mimesis. The Oxford Art Journal, 34(3): 335-353.

        Kim, David Y. 2011. Thinking with the Senses. The Oxford Art Journal, 34(1): 132-135.

        Kim, David Y. 2006. Uneasy Reflections: Images of Venice and Tenochtitlan in Benedetto Bordone's “Isolario.” RES: Anthropology and Aesthetics, 49/50: 80-91.

        Faculty Fellow

        Lynn Hollen Lees

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        Professor of History Emeritus

        Areas of Interest

          About

          Lynn Hollen Lees is Professor of History Emeritus, having retired in 2013 from her position as Vice Provost for Faculty after serving for several years as co-director of the Joseph H. Lauder Institute of Management and International Studies. Her teaching was primarily in the fields of British history, European social history, and world history. She has spent time as an exchange Professor at University College London, Catholic University of Leuven, and the University of Diponegoro in Indonesia, and was Chair of the Department of History between 1995 and 2001. Her research centers on European cities, their social organization, and their welfare institutions. 

          Selected Publications

          Lees, Lynn Hollen. 1979. Exiles of Erin: Irish Migrants in Victorian London.

          Lees, Lynn Hollen. 1979. The Solidarities of Strangers: The British Poor Laws and the People. 1700-1948. Cambridge.

          Lees, Lynn Hollen and Paul Hohenberg. 1995. The Making of Urban Europe, 1000-1995.  

          Crossley, Pamela K., Lynn Hollen Lees, and John W. Servos. 2007. Global Society: The World Since 1900 (2nd edition).

          Lees, Lynn Hollen and Andrew Lees. 2007. Cities and the Making of Modern Europe, 1750-1914. Cambridge University Press.

          Lees, Lynn Hollen and Andrew Lees. 2012. “European Cities, 1800-2000." In Oxford Handbook of Cities in World History, Peter Clark, ed. Oxford University Press.

          Faculty Fellow

          Ken Lum

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          Professor of Fine Arts and Director of the Fine Arts Undergraduate Program

          School/Department

          Areas of Interest

            About

            Ken Lum is a Professor of Fine Arts and Director of the Undergraduate Fine Arts program in the School of Design. Prior to Penn, Lum was Professor and Head of the Graduate Program in Studio Art at the University of British Columbia, Visiting Professor at the École Nationale Supérieure des Beaux-Arts in Paris, and Graduate Professor at the Milton Avery Graduate School of Arts at Bard College. He is the founding Editor of Yishu: The Journal of Contemporary Chinese Art. Lum was made a Guggenheim Fellow in 1999 and awarded a Killam Award for Outstanding Research in 1998 and the Hnatyshyn Foundation Visual Arts Award in 2007. He has served on the Board of Directors for the Annie Wong Art Foundation and Centre A: Center for Asian Art, and has been a Member of the City of Vancouver's Public Art Committee.

            Selected Publications

            Lum, Ken. 2009. “Dear Steven.” In Art School: (Propositions for the 21st Century), Steven Madoff, ed. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

            Lum, Ken and Hubert Damisch. 2008. Ultimo Bagaglio. Paris: Three Star Books.

            Lum, Ken. 1999. “Canadian Cultural Policy: A Metaphysical Problem.” In Conference 1: Inside Out: Reassessing International Cultural Influence. Wroclaw, Poland: apexart.

            Faculty Fellow

            Randall F. Mason

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            Associate Professor and Chair

            School/Department

            Areas of Interest

              About

              Randall F. Mason teaches in the Graduate Program in Historic Preservation and is Associate Professor in the Department of City and Regional Planning. His courses focus on historic preservation planning, urban conservation, history, and cultural landscape studies. Mason’s research interests include theory and methods of preservation planning, cultural policy, the economics of preservation, historic site management, the history and design of memorials, and the history of historic preservation. He leads the Center for Research on Preservation and Society, which undertakes applied research projects on site management and on social, economic and political aspects of historic preservation. Before joining the PennDesign faculty in 2004, Mason worked as Senior Project Specialist at the Getty Conservation Institute, researching economic and social issues relating to heritage conservation. Previous positions include Assistant Professor and Director of Historic Preservation at the University of Maryland, and adjunct faculty in landscape architecture at RISD.  His professional experience includes several years of consulting practice and co-founding the nonprofit research group Minerva Partners (which develops projects to strengthen the connections between heritage conservation and social development).  He serves on the Board of Directors of the Preservation Alliance of Greater Philadelphia, and was the 2012-13 National Endowment for the Arts Rome Prize winner at the American Academy in Rome.

              Selected Publications

              Mason, Randall. 2012. “Broadway as a Memory Site.” In The Greatest Grid: The Master Plan of Manhattan, 1811-2011, Hilary Ballon, ed. Columbia University Press.

              Mason, Randall. 2009. The Once and Future New York: Historic Preservation and the Modern City. University of Minnesota Press.

              Page, Max and Randall Mason, eds. 2004. Giving Preservation a History: Histories of Historic Preservation in the United States.

              Faculty Fellow

              Anuradha Mathur

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              Professor and Associate Chair

              About

              Anuradha Mathur is Professor and Associate Chair of the Department of Landscape Architecture in the School of Design. She is an architect and landscape architect. In collaboration with her partner, Dilip da Cunha, she has focused her artistic and design expertise on cultural and ecological issues of contentious landscapes. Their investigations have taken them to diverse terrains, including the Lower Mississippi, New York, Sundarbans, Bangalore, Mumbai and, most recently, Jerusalem. An underlying thread in Mathur’s work is a concern for how water is visualized and engaged in ways that lead to conditions of its excess and scarcity, but also the opportunities that its fluidity offers for new visualizations of terrain, design imagination, and design practice. In April, 2011 she conceived and curated an international symposium titled In the Terrain of Water, at the School of Design.  

              Selected Publications

              Mathur, Anuradha and Dilip da Cunha. 2009. Soak: Mumbai in an Estuary. National Gallery of Modern Art/Rupa & Co.

              Mathur, Anuradha and Dilip da Cunha. 2006. Deccan Traverses: The Making of Bangalore’s Terrain. Rupa & Co.

              Mathur, Anuradha and Dilip da Cunha. 2001. Mississippi Floods: Designing a Shifting Landscape. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press.

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