People

Penn IUR is affiliated with more than 200 experts in the field of urbanism. Its Faculty Fellows program identifies faculty at the University of Pennsylvania with a demonstrated interest in urban research; the Penn IUR Scholars program identifies urban scholars outside of Penn; and the Penn IUR Fellows program identifies expert urban practitioners. Together, these programs foster a community of scholars and encourage cross-disciplinary collaboration.

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Fellow

Stuart Andreason

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Senior Community and Economic Development Adviser, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta

Areas of Interest

    About

    Stuart Andreason is senior community and economic development adviser, specializing in human capital and workforce development, at the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta. His major fields of study are workforce and human capital development policy and economic development policy, with a specialization in labor market and socioeconomic conditions in metropolitan areas. Prior to joining the Atlanta Fed, Andreason was a research associate at the Penn Institute for Urban Research at the University of Pennsylvania (PennIUR). There, he helped develop a set of indicators of livable and sustainable communities for the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development funded by the Ford Foundation. He was a predoctoral fellow of the Department of Education's Institute of Education Sciences at Penn and a Lincoln Institute of Land Policy C. Lowell Harriss dissertation fellow. Previously, he led two nonprofit organizations focused on economic revitalization in small towns in central Virginia and worked as a research associate for the Pew Partnership for Civic Change. He has bachelor's and master's degrees in urban and environmental planning from the University of Virginia and a PhD in city and regional planning from the University of Pennsylvania.

     

    Selected Publications

    Andreason, Stuart and Laura Wolf-Powers. 2012. “Aligning Secondary and Post-Secondary Credentialization with Economic Development Strategy or ‘If Low Educational Attainment = Poor Metropolitan Competitiveness, What Can be Done About It.” In Preparing Today’s Students for Tomorrow’s Jobs in Metropolitan America, Laura W. Perna, ed. University of Pennsylvania Press.

    Lynch, Amy, Stuart Andreason, Theodore Eisenman, John Robinson, Kenneth Steif, and Eugenie L. Birch. Sustainable Urban Development Indicators for the United States. Penn Institute for Urban Research. September 2011

    Birch, Eugenie, Amy Lynch, Stuart Andreason, Theodore Eisenman, John Robinson, and Kenneth Steif. Measuring U.S. Sustainable Urban Development. Penn Institute for Urban Research. September 2011.

    Morse, Suzanne, Stuart Andreason, Tom Cross, and Joanne Tu. Southern Virginia: Building Competitive Advantage. Civic Change Incorporated. 2010.

    Andreason, Stuart. May 2014. Dissertation: “Will Talent Attraction and Retention Improve Metropolitan Labor Markets? The Labor Market Impact of Increased Educational Attainment in U.S. Metropolitan Regions 1990-2010.”  University of Pennsylvania.  

     

    Fellow

    Timothy J. Bartik

    x

    Senior Economist, W.E. Upjohn Institute

    Areas of Interest

      About

      Dr. Bartik’s research focuses on state and local economic development and local labor markets. This includes research on how early childhood programs affect local economies, and on job-creation programs. Bartik’s 1991 book, Who Benefits from State and Local Economic Development Policies? is widely cited as an important and influential review of the evidence on how local policies affect economic development. Bartik is co-editor of Economic Development Quarterly, the only journal focused on local economic development in the United States.
      Faculty Fellow

      David Bell

      x

      Xinmei Zhang and Yongge Dai Professor, Professor of Marketing

      About

      David Bell is Xinmei Zhang and Yongge Dai Professor and Professor of Marketing in the Marketing Department at The Wharton School. His current research focuses on the digital economy and success factors for Internet retail startups. Prior work in traditional retail settings explores unplanned and impulse buying, and consumer response to fixed and variable shopping costs. His articles have been published leading journals including Journal of Consumer Research, Journal of Marketing, Journal of Marketing Research, Management Science, and Marketing Science.

      Selected Publications

      Bell, David R., Santiago Gallino and Antonio Moreno. 2017 (forthcoming). “Revenge of the Store.” MIT Sloan Management Review. 

      Li, Kathleen and David Bell. 2017. “Estimation of average treatment effects with panel data: Asymptotic theory and implementation.” Journal of Econometrics 197: 65-75.

      Bell, David Bell. 2014. Location Is (Still) Everything: The Surprising Influence of the Real World on How We Search, Shop, and Sell in the Virtual One. Boston New Harvest, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt.

      Lee, Jae Young and David Bell. 2013. “Neighborhood Social Capital and Social Learning for Experience Attributes of Products.” Marketing Science 32(6): 960-976.

      Bell, David, JeongHye Choi, Leonard Lodish. 2012. “What Matters Most in Internet Retailing.” MIT Sloan Management Review 54: 27-33.

       

      Penn IUR Scholar

      Alain Bertaud

      x

      Senior Research Scholar at the NYU Stern Urbanization Project

      About

      Alain Bertaud is a senior research scholar at the NYU Stern Urbanization Project.  His main area of research is the impact of markets, transportation, and regulations on urban form.  At the moment, he is writing a book about urban planning that is tentatively titled Order Without Design. Bertaud previously held the position of principal urban planner at the World Bank, where he worked on urban policy and urban infrastructure development in India, in transition economies such as China, Russia, and countries of Eastern Europe.  After retiring from the Bank in 1999, he worked as an independent consultant.  Prior to joining the World Bank he worked as a resident urban planner in a number of cities around the world: Bangkok, San Salvador (El Salvador), Port au Prince (Haiti), Sana’a (Yemen), New York, Paris, Tlemcen (Algeria), and Chandigarh (India).

      Bertaud’s research, conducted in collaboration with his wife Marie-Agnès, aims to bridge the gap between operational urban planning and urban economics.  Their work focuses primarily on the interaction between urban forms, real estate markets and regulations. Bertaud’s publications can be downloaded from: http://alainbertaud.com.

      Selected Publications

      Bertaud, Alain and Brueckner, Jan K. 2005. Analyzing building-height restrictions: predicted impacts and welfare costs. Regional Science and Urban Economics, 35: 109-125.

      Bertaud, Alain. 2003. Clearing the air in Atlanta: transit and smart growth or conventional economics? Journal of Urban Economics, 54: 379–400.

      Bertaud, Alain. 2010. Land Markets, Government Interventions and Housing Affordability. Wolfensohn Center for Development Working Paper 18.

      Bertaud, Alain and Malpezzi, Stephen. 2001. Measuring the Costs and Benefits of Urban Land Use Regulation: A Simple Model with an Application to Malaysia. Journal of Housing Economics,10: 393–418.

      Emerging Scholar

      Peter Blair

      x

      Assistant Professor, John E. Walker Department of Economics, Clemson University

      Areas of Interest

        About

        Peter Blair is Assistant Professor of Economics at Clemson University. He graduated from the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania with his PhD in Applied Economics in 2015. His intellectual curiosity for economics developed from his experience as a young entrepreneur. As an Economics major at the College of the Bahamas, hisknowledge of the field grew in a more formal way. He received his undergraduate and graduate training in Theoretical Particle Physics at Duke University and Harvard University, which equipped him with the technical modelling tools to pursue graduate studies in Economics.
        Fellow

        Paul C. Brophy

        x

        Principal, Brophy & Reilly, LLC

        Senior Fellow, Metropolitan Policy Program, Brookings Institution

        Senior Fellow, Center for Community Progress, Senior Scholar, George Warren School of Social Work, Washington University in St. Louis

        Areas of Interest

          About

          Paul C. Brophy is a principal with Brophy & Reilly, LLC – a consulting firm specializing in economic development, housing and community development, and the management of complex urban redevelopment projects – and a Nonresident Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution, a Senior Advisor to the Center for Community Progress, and a Senior Scholar at the Brown School at Washington University in St. Louis. One of Brophy’s specialties is the improvement of older industrial cities and the neighborhoods within those cities. He is also Senior Advisor to Enterprise Community Partners. Prior to his forming Brophy & Reilly, LLC in 1993, Brophy was President and Co-CEO of the Enterprise Foundation and Executive Director of ACTION-Housing Inc., a nonprofit housing development and neighborhood enhancement organization located in Pittsburgh. He was Director of the first Department of Housing for the City of Pittsburgh, and the Executive Director of the City’s Urban Redevelopment Authority, responsible for downtown and neighborhood improvement.

          Selected Publications

          Brophy, Paul C. 2013. A Market-Oriented Approach to Neighborhoods. In Revitalizing American Cities, Susan M. Wachter and Kimberly Zeuli, eds. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.

          Brophy, Paul C., and Alice Shabecoff. 2001. A Guide to Careers in Community Development. Washington, DC: Island Press.

          Nenno, Mary K., Paul Brophy, Michael Barker. 1982. Housing and Local Government. Washington, DC: International City Management Association.

          Ahlbrandt, Roger S. and Paul C. Brophy. 1975. Neighborhood Revitalization: Theory and Practice. Boston: Lexington Books.

          Faculty Fellow

          Lawrence Brown

          x

          Miers Busch Professor of Statistics

          About

          Lawrence Brown is the Miers Busch Professor of Statistics in the Department of Statistics at The Wharton School. His research areas include statistical decision theory, statistical inference, nonparametric function estimation, foundations of statistics, sampling theory, and empirical queuing science.

          Selected Publications

          Brown, Lawrence D., National Research Council (U.S.) Panel on the Design of the 2010 Census Program of Evaluations and Experiments. 2010. Envisioning the 2020 Census. Washington, DC: National Academies Press.

          Brown, L. D., T. J. Plewes, and M. A. Gerstein. 2005. Measuring Research and Development in the United States Economy. Washington, DC: National Academies Press.

          Brown, L. D., N. Gans, A. Mandelbaum, A. Sakov, H. Shen, S. Zeltyn, and L. H. Zhao. 2005. “Statistical Analysis of a Telephone Call Center: a Queuing Science Perspective.” Journal of American Statistical Association 100.

          Brown, L. D., T. T. Cai, and A. DasGupta. 1999. “Interval Estimation for a Binomial Proportion.” Statistical Science 16.

          Brown, L. D. and M. G. Low. 1996. “Asymptotic Equivalence of Nonparametric Regression and White Noise.” Annals of Statistics 24.

          Penn IUR Scholar

          Peter Hendee Brown

          x

          Urban Development Consultant; Lecturer, Humphrey School of Public Affairs, University of Minnesota

          About

          Peter Hendee Brown is an urban development consultant to public, private, and nonprofit organizations including the City of Minneapolis and Target Corporation. He teaches private sector development at the University of Minnesota’s Humphrey School of Public Affairs and he has also taught urban design and site planning.  Brown’s research program draws upon his multi-disciplinary background in architecture, planning, government administration, and real estate development, connecting his experience as a practitioner with teaching and writing about urban redevelopment from multiple viewpoints. In 2009, Brown published his acclaimed book America’s Waterfront Revival: Port Authorities and Urban Redevelopment. The book focuses on four major port-based cities in the United States, analyzes their history, and considers the challenges and opportunities of waterfront redevelopment. Brown is currently completing a book about how real estate developers think for people who study them and work with them, from planners and architects to elected officials, city staff, and members of the community.

          Selected Publications

          Brown, Peter Hendee. 2014, forthcoming. Selling Dreams:  How Real Estate Developers Think About Design, Profits, and the Community. Philadelphia, PA: The University of Pennsylvania Press.

          Brown, Peter Hendee and Peter V. Hall. 2013. “Ports and Waterfronts.” In Infrastructure Planning and Finance: A Smart and Sustainable Guide, Vicki Elmer and Adam Liegland, eds. New York: Routledge Press.

          Brown, Peter Hendee. 2013. “The Delaware River Port Authority.” In The Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia, Charlene Mires, Howard Gillette, and Randall Miller, eds. Mid-Atlantic Regional Center for the Humanities at Rutgers-Camden. Available online; Print volume to be published by The University of Pennsylvania Press (forthcoming).

          Brown, Peter Hendee. 2011. “The Diversified Waterfront and the New Port Authority.” In The Port City in the XXI Century: New Challenges in the Relationship between Port and City, Rinio Bruttomesso and Joan Alemany, eds. Venice: RETE.

          Brown, Peter Hendee. 2008. America’s Waterfront Revival: Port Authorities and Urban Redevelopment. Philadelphia, PA: The University of Pennsylvania Press.

          Penn IUR Scholar

          Robert Buckley

          x

          Julien Studley Fellow, Milano School of International Affairs, The New School

          About

          Bob is the Julien Studley Fellow in the Graduate Program in International Affairs at The New School.  Previously, he was Managing Director at the Rockefeller Foundation, and Advisor at the World Bank.  His work has focused on urbanization in developing countries.  A significant part involved preparing projects and grants related to urban development issues.  He has worked in more than 55 countries and has written widely on urbanization, housing, and development issues in the popular press, such as the Financial Times, the New York Times, and the Washington Post, as well as in academic journals such as the Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Nature, the Journal of Money,Credit and Banking, and Economic Development and Cultural Change.  His most recent book, Urbanization and Economic Growth, was co-edited with Michael Spence and Patricia Annez. Buckley has also taught at Syracuse University, Johns Hopkins University, and the University of Pennsylvania—and served as the chief economist of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development.  Finally, he has been a Fulbright Scholar, awarded a Regent's Fellowship at the University of California, and been supported by the Marshall Fund, the Gates Foundation, the National Science Foundation, and the International Growth Centre of Oxford University.

          Selected Publications

          Selected Publications

          Buckley, Robert and Achilles Kallergis. 2014. Does African Urban Policy Provide a Platform for Sustained Economic Growth? In The Handbook on Cities in the Global South, S. Parnell and S. Oldfield, (eds.) New York: Routledge.

          Buckley, Robert, Patricia Annez and Michael Spence. 2009. Urbanization and Economic Growth. The World Bank on behalf of the Commission on Growth and Development, Washington D.C.

          Buckley, Robert, Glumira Karaguishiyeva, Robert Van Order, and Laura Vecvagare. March 2006. Mortgage Credit Risk in EU Countries: Constraints on Exploiting the Single Currency Market, The European Journal of Law and Economics.  

          Buckely, Robert and Jerry Kalarickal. Sept. 2005. Housing Policy in Developing Countries: Conjectures and Refutations, World Bank Research Observer.

           

          Penn IUR Scholar

          Raymond J. Burby

          x

          Professor Emeritus, City and Regional Planning, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

          About

          Raymond Burby is Professor Emeritus in City and Regional Planning at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, a member of the College of Fellows of the American Institute of Certified Planners, and a member of various other organizations concerned with urban planning. He has been the author or editor of fourteen books and written numerous articles, including papers published in the Journal of the American Planning Association, Public Administration Review, Journal of Planning Education and Research, and Land Economics. Burby’s research and publications encompass many topics and incorporate his work on mitigation of natural hazards, land-use and environmental planning, housing and community development, and planning processes and administration.

          Selected Publications

          Burby, Raymond J. and Peter J. May. 2009. Command or Cooperate: Rethinking Traditional Central Governments' Hazard Mitigation Policies. In Building Safer Communities 58, NATO Science for Peace and Security Series, Urbano Fra Paleo, ed. Amsterdam: IOS Press.

          Burby, Raymond J. 2006. Hurricane Katrina and the Paradoxes of Government Disaster Policy: Bringing About Wise Governmental Decisions for Hazardous Areas. The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 604(1): 171-191.

          Burby, Raymond J. 2005. Have State Comprehensive Planning Mandates Reduced Insured Losses in Natural Disasters? Natural Hazards Review, 6: 67-81.

          Nelson, Arthur C., Raymond J. Burby, Edward Feser, Casey J. Dawkins, Emil E. Malizia, and Roberto Quercia. 2004. Urban Containment and Central City Revitalization. Journal of the American Planning Association, 70: 411-425.

          Burby, Raymond J. 2003. Making Plans that Matter: Citizen Involvement and Government Action. Journal of the American Planning Association, 69(1): 33-49.

          Burby, Raymond J., Laura J. Steinberg, and Victoria Basolo. 2003. The Tenure Trap: The Vulnerability of Renters to Joint Natural and Technological Disasters. Urban Affairs Review, 39: 32-59.

          Penn IUR Scholar

          Daniel Campo

          x

          Associate Professor, Department of Graduate Built Environment Studies, School of Architecture and Planning, Morgan State University

          About

          Daniel Campo is Associate Professor in the School of Architecture and Planning at Morgan State University in Baltimore. Campo’s research explores informal, insurgent and do-it-yourself development practices and their intersection with professional urban planning, design and preservation. His book, The Accidental Playground: Brooklyn Waterfront Narratives of the Undesigned and Unplanned was named by the New York Times as one of a ten book “urban canon” of suggested reading for the New York City Mayor. Campo has also published articles on a range of urban topics, including public space studies, downtown and waterfront revitalization, historic preservation, history of the built environment, shrinking cities, and urban arts and culture. His current research examines sub-professional and grassroots efforts to preserve, reuse and enjoy iconic but decaying industrial complexes across the North American Rustbelt. 

          Selected Publications

          Campo, Daniel, “Iconic Eyesores: Exploring Do-it-yourself Preservation and Civic Improvement at Abandoned Train Stations in Buffalo and Detroit,” Journal of Urbanism 7-4 (2014).

          Campo, Daniel, “Postindustrial Futures: Adaptive Reuse versus ‘as is’ Preservation,” in Schwarz, Terry, ed., Historic Preservation and Urban Change (Cleveland: Kent State University, 2014).

          Campo, Daniel, The Accidental Playground: Brooklyn Waterfront Narratives of the Undesigned and Unplanned (New York: Fordham University Press, 2013).

          Ryan, Brent D. and Daniel Campo, “Autotopia’s End: The Decline and Fall of Detroit’s Automotive Manufacturing Landscape,” Journal of Planning History 12-2 (2013).

          Campo, Daniel, “In the Footsteps of the Federal Writers’ Project: Revisiting the Workshop of the World,” Landscape Journal 29-2 (2010).

          Campo, Daniel and Brent D. Ryan, “The Entertainment Zone: Unplanned Nightlife and the Revitalization of the American Downtown,” Journal of Urban Design 13-3 (2008).

           

          Penn IUR Scholar

          Anthony P. Carnevale

          x

          Director and Research Professor, Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce

          Areas of Interest

            About

            Anthony P. Carnevale is Director and Research Professor at the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce, and an internationally renowned authority and scholar on education, training and employment. Earlier in his career, Carnevale founded and became President of the Institute for Workplace Learning, where he remained for ten years. Carnevale also was Director of Human Resource and Employment Studies at the Committee for Economic Development where he was appointed by President Clinton to Chair the National Commission on Employment Policy. Carnevale co-authored the principal affidavit in Rodriguez v. San Antonio, a national Supreme Court action to reform unequal tax burdens and education benefits. This historic case resulted in significant fiscal reforms in a wide variety of important states, and remains prevalent to this day.

            Selected Publications

            Carnevale, Anthony P., Nicole Smith, and Jeff Strohl. 2012. Postsecondary Education and Economic Opportunity. In Preparing Today’s Students for Tomorrow’s Jobs in Metropolitan America, 93-120. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.

            Carnevale, Anthony P. and Susan Carol Stone. 1995. The American Mosaic: An In-Depth Report on the Future of Diversity at Work. New York: McGraw-Hill.

            Carnevale, Anthony P. and Leila J. Gainer and Ann S. Meltzer. 1990 (1st ed). Workplace Basics: The Essential Skills Employers Want. Jossey-Bass Business and Management Series. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

            Carnevale, Anthony P. 1991 (1st ed). America and New Economy: How New Competitive Standards are Radically Changing American Workplaces. Jossey-Bass Business and Management Series. New York: Wiley.

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