People

Penn IUR is affiliated with more than 200 experts in the field of urbanism. Its Faculty Fellows program identifies faculty at the University of Pennsylvania with a demonstrated interest in urban research; the Penn IUR Scholars program identifies urban scholars outside of Penn; and the Penn IUR Fellows program identifies expert urban practitioners. Together, these programs foster a community of scholars and encourage cross-disciplinary collaboration.

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Affiliated PhD Student

Cameron Anglum

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Doctoral Candidate in Education Policy, University of Pennsylvania

School/Department

Areas of Interest

    About

    Cameron Anglum is a Doctoral Student in Education Policy and a Dean’s Scholar at the Graduate School of Education. He is interested in research centered on domestic urban educational reform in the context of myriad interdependent urban concerns including fiscal policy, spatial analysis, and public-private partnerships, subjects often siloed in public dialogue.

    Formerly of the Penn Institute for Urban Research, Anglum earned a Master’s degree in Education Policy at Penn GSE and a Bachelor’s degree in Economics from Penn’s College of Arts and Sciences. Prior to returning to Penn, he worked in investment management in the portfolio construction space for private and institutional clients.

     

    Fellow

    Timothy J. Bartik

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    Senior Economist, W.E. Upjohn Institute

    Areas of Interest

      About

      Dr. Bartik’s research focuses on state and local economic development and local labor markets. This includes research on how early childhood programs affect local economies, and on job-creation programs. Bartik’s 1991 book, Who Benefits from State and Local Economic Development Policies? is widely cited as an important and influential review of the evidence on how local policies affect economic development. Bartik is co-editor of Economic Development Quarterly, the only journal focused on local economic development in the United States.
      Emerging Scholar

      Peter Blair

      x

      Assistant Professor, John E. Walker Department of Economics, Clemson University

      Areas of Interest

        About

        Peter Blair is Assistant Professor of Economics at Clemson University. He graduated from the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania with his PhD in Applied Economics in 2015. His intellectual curiosity for economics developed from his experience as a young entrepreneur. As an Economics major at the College of the Bahamas, hisknowledge of the field grew in a more formal way. He received his undergraduate and graduate training in Theoretical Particle Physics at Duke University and Harvard University, which equipped him with the technical modelling tools to pursue graduate studies in Economics.
        Penn IUR Scholar

        Anthony P. Carnevale

        x

        Director and Research Professor, Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce

        Areas of Interest

          About

          Anthony P. Carnevale is Director and Research Professor at the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce, and an internationally renowned authority and scholar on education, training and employment. Earlier in his career, Carnevale founded and became President of the Institute for Workplace Learning, where he remained for ten years. Carnevale also was Director of Human Resource and Employment Studies at the Committee for Economic Development where he was appointed by President Clinton to Chair the National Commission on Employment Policy. Carnevale co-authored the principal affidavit in Rodriguez v. San Antonio, a national Supreme Court action to reform unequal tax burdens and education benefits. This historic case resulted in significant fiscal reforms in a wide variety of important states, and remains prevalent to this day.

          Selected Publications

          Carnevale, Anthony P., Nicole Smith, and Jeff Strohl. 2012. Postsecondary Education and Economic Opportunity. In Preparing Today’s Students for Tomorrow’s Jobs in Metropolitan America, 93-120. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.

          Carnevale, Anthony P. and Susan Carol Stone. 1995. The American Mosaic: An In-Depth Report on the Future of Diversity at Work. New York: McGraw-Hill.

          Carnevale, Anthony P. and Leila J. Gainer and Ann S. Meltzer. 1990 (1st ed). Workplace Basics: The Essential Skills Employers Want. Jossey-Bass Business and Management Series. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

          Carnevale, Anthony P. 1991 (1st ed). America and New Economy: How New Competitive Standards are Radically Changing American Workplaces. Jossey-Bass Business and Management Series. New York: Wiley.

          Faculty Fellow

          Camille Z. Charles

          x

          Professor of Sociology; Edmund J. and Louise W. Kahn Term Professor in the Social Sciences

          Chair, Department of Africana Studies

          About

          Camille Charles is Professor of Sociology, Edmund J. and Louise W. Kahn Term Professor in the Social Sciences, and Chair of the Department of Africana Studies in the Department of Sociology in the School of Arts and Sciences. Her research interests are in the areas of urban inequality, racial attitudes and intergroup relations, racial residential segregation, minorities in higher education, and racial identity.  Her work has appeared in Social Forces, Social Problems, Social Science Research, The DuBois Review, the American Journal of Education, the Annual Review of Sociology, the Chronicle of Higher Education, and The Root.

          Selected Publications

          Charles, Camille Z., Douglas S. Massey, Mary J. Fischer, and Margarita Mooney, with Brooke A. Cunningham, and Gniesha Y. Dinwiddie. 2009. Taming the River: Negotiating the Academic, Financial and Social Currents in Selective Colleges and Universities. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.

          Bobo, Lawrence D. and Camille Z. Charles. 2008. Race in the American Mind: From the Moynihan Report to the Obama Candidacy. The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Sciences 621: 243-259. Charles, Camille Zubrinsky. 2007. Comfort Zones: Immigration, Acculturation, and the Neighborhood Racial Composition Preferences of Latinos and Asians. Du Bois Review: Social Science Research on Race 4(1): 41-77.

          Charles, Camille Z., Kimberly C. Torres, and Rachelle J. Brunn. 2007. Black Like Who? Exploring the Racial, Ethnic, and Class Diversity of Black Students at Selective Colleges and Universities. In Racism in Post-Race America: New 4 Theories, New Directions, Charles A. Gallagher, ed. Chapel Hill, NC: Social Forces, 247-266.

          Charles, Camille Zubrinsky. 2006. Won’t You Be My Neighbor? Race, Class and Residence in Los Angeles. New York: Russell Sage. 

          Fellow

          Andrew Davidson

          x

          President, Andrew Davidson & Co.

          Areas of Interest

            About

            Andrew Davidson is a financial innovator and leader in the development of financial research and analytics. He has worked extensively on mortgage-backed securities product development, valuation and hedging. He is president of Andrew Davidson & Co., Inc., a New York firm specializing in the application of analytical tools to investment management, which he founded in 1992. Andrew was instrumental in the creation of the Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae risk-sharing transactions: STACR and CAS. These transactions allow Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae to attract private capital to bear credit risk, even as they remain in government conservatorship. Andrew is also active in other dimensions of GSE reform and has testified before the Senate Banking Committee on multiple occasions. Andrew also helped establish the Structured Finance Industry Group and served on the Executive Committee at its inception. He received an MBA in Finance at the University of Chicago and a BA in Mathematics and Physics at Harvard.

             

            Selected Publications

            Mortgage Valuation Models: Embedded Options, Risk, and Uncertainty with Alexander Levin, June 2014, Oxford University Press.

            Securitization: Structuring and Investment Analysis with Anthony Sanders, Lan-Ling Wolff and Anne Ching, Sep 2003, Wiley.

            Mortgage-Backed Securities: Investment Analysis and Advanced Valuation Techniques with Michael Herskovitz, Dec 1993, Probus.

            Fellow

            Derek Douglas

            x

            Vice President for Civic Engagement, University of Chicago

            Areas of Interest

              About

              Derek Douglas is Vice President for Civic Engagement at the University of Chicago. Douglas leads the university’s local, national, and international urban development and civic engagement efforts to enhance the quality of life for local residents and enrich the work of faculty and students through research, education and direct engagement. Previously, Douglas served as Special Assistant to President Barack Obama on the White House Domestic Policy Council (DPC) where he served as the principal architect of President Obama’s agenda to strengthen our nation’s cities and metropolitan regions.

              Faculty Fellow

              Vivian Gadsden

              x

              William T. Carter Professor of Child Development and Education; Director, National Center on Fathers and Families

              Associate Director, National Center on Adult Literacy

              School/Department

              Areas of Interest

                About

                Vivian Gadsden is the William T. Carter Professor of Child Development and Education, Director of the National Center on Fathers and Families, and Associate Director of the National Center on Adult Literacy at the Graduate School of Education. Her research interests focus on cultural and social factors affecting learning and literacy across the life-course and within families, particularly those at the greatest risk for academic and social vulnerability and her writing focuses on intergenerational learning. Her current projects include a longitudinal study on intergenerational learning within African-American and Latino families; a study of parent engagement in children’s early literacy; a study with young fathers in urban settings; a study on literacy, education, and health; a policy study on incarcerated parents and their families; and a study of children of incarcerated parents. She is participating in an NICHD-funded project (Dr. John Fantuzzo, principal investigator) on the development of an integrated Head Start curriculum.

                Selected Publications

                Gadsden, V. L. and P. Genty, eds. Forthcoming. Incarcerated Parents and Their Children. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.

                Wortham, S. and V.L. Gadsden. 2009. The Complexities of “Similarity” in Research Interviewing. In Investigating Classroom Interaction: Methodologies in Action, K. Kumpulainen and M. Cesar, eds.

                Gadsden, V. L. 2008. The Arts and Education: Knowledge Generation, Pedagogy, and the Discourse of Learning. Review of Research in Education 32: 29-61.

                Faculty Fellow

                Kathleen D. Hall

                x

                Associate Professor of Education and Anthropology, Education, Culture, and Society Division

                Associate Professor of Education Associated Faculty (secondary appointment)

                About

                Kathleen D. Hall is Associate Professor of Education and Anthropology in the Education, Culture, and Society Division of the Graduate School of Education with a secondary appointment in the Department of Anthropology. She is a member of the graduate groups in Sociology, Folklore, Social Policy and Practice, and South Asia Studies and is affiliated with the Urban Studies and Asian American Studies programs. She received the Michael Katz Excellence in Teaching Award in the Urban Studies Program in 2001 and the Provost’s Award for Distinguished Ph.D Teaching and Mentoring in 2009. Her research and publications focus on: immigration, citizenship, racial and class inequality, and national incorporation in the United Kingdom and the United States; the politics of knowledge in public sector policy and governance; risk management, human rights, and anti-terrorism law in the United Kingdom; and concepts of "global citizenship" and related efforts to "internationalize" K-16 education in the US and the UK Before joining the GSE faculty in 1995, Hall was a postdoctoral Fellow at Chapin Hall Center for Children at the University of Chicago, where she conducted research on community-based poverty initiatives. 

                Selected Publications

                Hall, K. D. 2010. Security and the Risk Management State: British Anti-Terrorism Policies After 7/7. In New Ethnographies at the Limits of Neoliberalism, C. Greenhouse, ed. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press. 

                Hall, K. D. 2009. British Sikh Lives Lived in Translation. Everyday Life in South Asia, 2nd Edition. Bloomington: University of Indiana Press.

                Hall, K. D. 2005. Science, Globalization and Educational Governance: The Political Rationalities of the New Managerialism. The Indiana Journal of Global Legal Studies. Special edition on Globalization and Education 12(1): 153-182.

                Hall, K. D. 2004. The Ethnography of Imagined Communities: The Cultural Production of Sikh Ethnicity in Britain. In Being Here and Being There: Fieldwork Encounters and Ethnographic Discoveries,  E. Anderson, S. Brooks, R. Gunn, and N. Jones, eds. The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science [Special Issue]: 595.

                Penn IUR Scholar

                Shaun R. Harper

                x

                Executive Director, Southern California Center on Race & Equity

                School/Department

                Areas of Interest

                  About

                  Shaun R. Harper was Associate Professor and Director of the Center for the Study of Race and Equity in Education in the Higher Education Division of the Graduate School of Education. He now acts as Founding Executive Director for the Southern California Center on Race & Equity. His research examines race and gender in higher education, Black male college access and achievement, and college student engagement. He has published eleven books and more than eighty peer-reviewed journal articles and other academic publications. His research has been praised by the Association for the Study of Higher Education (2008 Early Career Award); the National Association of Student Personnel Administrators (2010 Outstanding Contribution to Research Award, 2012 Robert H. Shaffer Award for Faculty Excellence, and 2013 Pillar of the Profession); and the American Educational Research Association (2010 Division G Early Career Award). He is principal investigator of the New York City Black and Latino Male High School Achievement Study.

                  Selected Publications

                  Harper, Shaun R and J. Luke Wood. 2014. Advancing Black Male Student Success from Preschool through Ph.D. Stylus Publishing.

                  Harper, Shaun R. 2013. Am I My Brother’s Teacher? Black Undergraduates, Peer Pedagogies, and Racial Socialization in Predominantly White Postsecondary Contexts. Review of Research in Education, 37: 183-211.

                  Schuh, John H., Susan R. Jones, and Shaun R. Harper. 2011. Student Services: A Handbook for the Profession (5th edition). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

                  Harper, Shaun R. 2012. Race without Racism: How Higher Education Researchers Minimize Racist Institutional Norms. The Review of Higher Education, 36(1): 9-29.

                  Harper, S. R., and C. H. F. Davis III. 2012. They (Don’t) Care about Education: A Counternarrative on Black Male Students’ Responses to Inequitable Schooling. Educational Foundations, 26(1), 103-120.

                  Harper, S. R., and K.A. Griffin. 2011. Opportunity beyond Affirmative Action: How Low-income and Working-class Black Male Achievers Access Highly Selective, High-cost Colleges and Universities. Harvard Journal of African American Public Policy, 17(1): 43-60.

                  Penn IUR Scholar

                  Brian A. Jacob

                  x

                  Walter H. Annenberg Professor of Education Policy, Professor of Economics, and Professor of Education, University of Michigan

                  Areas of Interest

                    About

                    Brian Jacob is the Walter H. Annenberg Professor of Education Policy, Professor of Economics, and Professor of Education at the University of Michigan. He is Co-Director of the Education Policy Initiative (EPI) and former Director of the Center for Local, State and Urban Policy (CLOSUP), as well as a Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER). He has previously served as a policy analyst in the NYC Mayor's Office and taught middle school in East Harlem. His primary fields of interest are labor economics, program evaluation, and the economics of education. His current research focuses on school accountability, teacher labor markets and virtual schooling. In 2008, Jacob received the David N. Kershaw Prize, an award given every two years to honor persons who, at under the age of forty, have made a distinguished contribution to the field of public policy. 

                    Selected Publications

                    Dee, T. S., B. A. Jacob, and Nathaniel L. Schwartz. Forthcoming. The Effects of No Child Left Behind on Education Finance and Practice. Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis.

                    Jacob, Brian A., Ludwig, Jens and Douglas Miller 2013. The Effects of Housing and Neighborhood Conditions on Child Mortality. Journal of Health Economics, 32(1): 195-206.

                    Jacob, Brian A.  2011. Do Principals Fire the Worst Teachers? Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis, 33(4): 403-434.

                    Jacob, Brian A. and Jens Ludwig. 2011.  Educational Interventions: Their Effects on the Achievement of Poor Children.  In Neighborhood and Life Chances: How Place Matters in Modern America,  Harriet B. Newburger, Eugénie L. Birch, and Susan M. Wachter, eds. Philadelphia, PA: University of Pennsylvania Press.

                    Cullen, J. and Jacob, B. 2008.  Is Gaining Access to a Selective Elementary School Gaining Ground?  Evidence from Randomized Lotteries. In An Economics Perspective on the Problems of Disadvantaged Youth Jonathan, Gruber, ed.  Chicago: University of Chicago Press. 

                    Penn IUR Scholar

                    Paul A. Jargowsky

                    x

                    Professor of Public Policy and Director, Center for Urban Research and Urban Education, Rutgers University

                    Senior Research Affiliate, National Poverty Center, University of Michigan

                    Areas of Interest

                      About

                      Paul A. Jargowksy is Professor of Public Policy and Director, Center for Urban Research and Urban Education at Rutgers University. His primary areas of research focus on racial and economic segregation, the impacts of economic and spatial inequality, and the origins and consequences of exclusionary suburban development patterns. Prior to his position as Professor of Public Policy at Rutgers University, he was the Project Director for the New York State Task Force on Poverty and Welfare Reform and was also involved in fair housing and desegregation litigation as a consultant and expert witness. Jargowsky contributed to the report of the Task Force, The New Social Contract: Rethinking the Nature and Purpose of Public Assistance, which was extremely influential in reshaping the welfare reform debate. His book Poverty and Place was recognized as the “Best Book in Urban Affairs Published in 1997 or 1998” by the Urban Affairs Association.

                      Selected Publications

                      Jargowsky, Paul A. and Jeongdai Kim. 2009. The Information Theory of Segregation: Uniting Segregation and Inequality in a Common Framework, Research on Economic Inequality, 17: 3-31.

                      Kim, Jeongdai and Paul A. Jargowsky. 2009. The GINI Coefficient and Segregation on a Continuous Variable. Research on Economic Inequality, 17: 1129-1151.

                      Jargowsky, Paul A. 2003. Stunning Progress, Hidden Problems: The Dramatic Decline of Concentrated Poverty in the 1990s. Washington, DC: The Brookings Institution.

                      Jargowsky, Paul A. 1997. Poverty and Place: Ghettos, Barrios, and the American City. New York: Russell Sage Foundation. 

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