People

Penn IUR is affiliated with more than 200 experts in the field of urbanism. Its Faculty Fellows program identifies faculty at the University of Pennsylvania with a demonstrated interest in urban research; the Penn IUR Scholars program identifies urban scholars outside of Penn; and the Penn IUR Fellows program identifies expert urban practitioners. Together, these programs foster a community of scholars and encourage cross-disciplinary collaboration.

View by:
, ,
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
clear
Faculty Fellow

Daniel Barber

x

Assistant Professor and Associate Chair

School/Department

Areas of Interest

    About

    Daniel Barber is an Assistant Professor and Associate Chair of Architecture in the School of Design. He is an architectural historian with a research interest in the relationship between the design fields and the emergence of global environmental culture across the twentieth century. His research looks at the role of architectural technologies in the infrastructural and territorial transformations of the immediate post-World War II period in the United States. Barber’s first book, A House in the Sun: Modern Architecture and Solar Energy in the Cold War, will be published by Oxford University Press in 2015. It documents the brief but dynamic interest in solar houses in the 1940s and 50s; he has also published recently on connections between architectural design methods and climate science. He approaches research and teaching from an interdisciplinary perspective, integrating narratives and methods from histories of technology, science, politics, economics, and environmentalism.

    Selected Publications

    Barber, Daniel. 2014. Tomorrow’s House: Solar Housing in 1940s America. In Technology and Culture (forthcoming)

    Barber, Daniel. 2013. “Visualizing Renewable Resources. In Architecture and Energy: Performance and Style,” 164-180, William Braham and Daniel Willis, eds. New York: Routledge.

    Barber, Daniel. 2013. “Experimental Dwellings: Modern Architecture and Environmental Research at the M.I.T. Solar Energy Fund,” 1938-1963. In A Second Modernism: MIT, Architecture, and the “Techno-Social” Moment, 283-316, Arindam Dutta, ed. Cambridge: MIT Press.

    Barber, Daniel. 2013. The World Solar Energy Project, ca. 1954. Grey Room (Quarterly), 51: 64-93.

    Barber, Daniel. 2011. Making Design Environmental. Pidgin Magazine, 10: 246-259.

    Penn IUR Scholar

    Timothy Beatley

    x

    Teresa Heinz Professor of Sustainable Communities

    Chair, Department of Urban and Environmental Planning, School of Architecture, University of Virginia

    About

    Timothy Beatley is the Teresa Heinz Professor of Sustainable Communities and Chair of the Department of Urban and Environmental Planning in the School of Architecture at the University of Virginia. Beatley’s work focuses on creating sustainable communities and cultivating creative strategies through which cities and towns can reduce their ecological footprints. Beatley is an author of or contributor to more than fifteen books concerning sustainability. 

    Selected Publications

    Beatley, Timothy, David Brower and Anna K. Schwab. 2001. An Introduction to Coastal Zone Management. Washington, DC: Island Press.

    Beatley, Timothy. 2005. Native to Nowhere: Sustaining Home and Community in a Global Age. Washington, DC: Island Press.

    Beatley, Timothy. 1999. Green Urbanism: Learning From European Cities. Washington, DC: Island Press.

    Beatley, Timothy. 2010. Biophilic Cities: Integrating Nature into Urban Design and Planning. Washington, DC: Island Press.

    Beatley, Timothy, Peter Newman and Heather Boyer. 2009. Resilient Cities: Responding to Peak Oil and Climate Change. Washington, DC: Island Press.

    Beatley, Timothy. 1999. Planning for Coastal Resilience: Best Practices for Calamitous Times. Washington, DC: Island Press.

    Penn IUR Scholar

    Richard Bernknopf

    x

    Research Professor, Department of Economics, University of New Mexico

    Areas of Interest

      About

      Richard Bernknopf is Research Professor in the Department of Economics at the University of New Mexico. Previously, Berknopf was an economist with the USGS Western Geographic Science Center; his work with USGS has spanned more than three decades. Bernknopf’s research focuses on the demonstration of the relevance to society of natural science information including earth observation and the translation of that information into a form compatible with decision-making processes. He is currently associated with the Science Impact Laboratory for Policy and Economics at the University of New Mexico and the Wharton Geospatial Initiative at the University of Pennsylvania. His areas of expertise include Natural Science Information and Policy.

      Selected Publications

      Labiosa, William, Paul Hearn, David Strong, Richard Bernknopf, Dianna Hogan, Leonard Pearlstine. 2010. The South Florida Ecosystem Portfolio Model: A Web-Enabled Multicriteria Land Use Planning Decision Support System. Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences (HICSS): 1-10.

      Bernknopf, Richard L., Sharyl J. M. Rabinovici, Nathan J. Wood, Laura B. Dinitz. 2006. The Influence of Hazard Models on GIS-based Regional Risk Assessments and Mitigation Policies. International Journal of Risk Assessment and Management. 6(4/5/6): 369-387.

      Bernknopf, R., T. Smith, A. Wein. 2006. The Effect of Spatially Correlated Failures on Natural Hazard Damage Assessments. American Geophysical Union, Fall Meeting: abstract #GC43A-04.

      Penn IUR Scholar

      Raymond J. Burby

      x

      Professor Emeritus, City and Regional Planning, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

      About

      Raymond Burby is Professor Emeritus in City and Regional Planning at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, a member of the College of Fellows of the American Institute of Certified Planners, and a member of various other organizations concerned with urban planning. He has been the author or editor of fourteen books and written numerous articles, including papers published in the Journal of the American Planning Association, Public Administration Review, Journal of Planning Education and Research, and Land Economics. Burby’s research and publications encompass many topics and incorporate his work on mitigation of natural hazards, land-use and environmental planning, housing and community development, and planning processes and administration.

      Selected Publications

      Burby, Raymond J. and Peter J. May. 2009. Command or Cooperate: Rethinking Traditional Central Governments' Hazard Mitigation Policies. In Building Safer Communities 58, NATO Science for Peace and Security Series, Urbano Fra Paleo, ed. Amsterdam: IOS Press.

      Burby, Raymond J. 2006. Hurricane Katrina and the Paradoxes of Government Disaster Policy: Bringing About Wise Governmental Decisions for Hazardous Areas. The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 604(1): 171-191.

      Burby, Raymond J. 2005. Have State Comprehensive Planning Mandates Reduced Insured Losses in Natural Disasters? Natural Hazards Review, 6: 67-81.

      Nelson, Arthur C., Raymond J. Burby, Edward Feser, Casey J. Dawkins, Emil E. Malizia, and Roberto Quercia. 2004. Urban Containment and Central City Revitalization. Journal of the American Planning Association, 70: 411-425.

      Burby, Raymond J. 2003. Making Plans that Matter: Citizen Involvement and Government Action. Journal of the American Planning Association, 69(1): 33-49.

      Burby, Raymond J., Laura J. Steinberg, and Victoria Basolo. 2003. The Tenure Trap: The Vulnerability of Renters to Joint Natural and Technological Disasters. Urban Affairs Review, 39: 32-59.

      Faculty Fellow

      Daniel Aldana Cohen

      x

      Assistant Professor of Sociology, School of Arts and Sciences, University of Pennsylvania

      About

      Daniel Aldana Cohen is Assistant Professor of Sociology at the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Cohen's writing and research are on climate politics. He investigates the intersections of climate change, inequalities of race and social class, and the political projects of both elites and social movements in global cities of the North and South. Cohen's work has been published in Nature, Public Culture, Jacobin, Dissent, Public Books, NACLA Report on the Americas, and elsewhere.

      Faculty Fellow

      Tom Daniels

      x

      Professor of City and Regional Planning and Director of the Certificate in Land Preservation Program

      About

      Tom Daniels is Professor of City and Regional Planning and Director of the Certificate in Land Preservation Program in the Department of City and Regional Planning in the School of Design. His main areas of interest are farmland preservation, growth management, and the connection between land use and water quality. Daniels often serves as a consultant to state and local governments and land trusts. He lives in Lancaster, Pennsylvania where for nine years he managed the county’s nationally recognized farmland preservation program. Daniels’ has taught at SUNY-Albany, Kansas State University, and Iowa State University and has served on the Editorial Advisory Board of the Journal of the American Planning Association. In 2002 he was a Senior Fulbright Scholar at the University of New South Wales in Sydney, Australia.

      Selected Publications

      Walker, Doug and Tom Daniels. 2011. The Planners Guide to CommunityViz: The Essential Tool for a New Generation of Planning. American Planning Association.

      Daniels, Tom. 2010. Integrating Forest Carbon Sequestration Into a Cap-and-Trade Program to Reduce Net CO2 Emissions. Journal of the American Planning Association, 76(4).

      Daniels, Tom. 2009. A Trail Across Time: American Environmental Planning from City Beautiful to Sustainability. Journal of the American Planning Association, 75(2).

      Daniels, Tom. 1999. When City and Country Collide: Managing Growth in the Metropolitan Fringe. Washington, DC: Island Press.

      Daniels, Tom and Deborah Bowers. 1997. Holding Our Ground: Protecting America’s Farmland. Washington, DC: Island Press.

      Penn IUR Scholar

      Margaret Dewar

      x

      Professor of Urban and Regional Planning, Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning, University of Michigan

      About

      Margaret Dewar is Professor of Urban and Regional Planning in the Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning at the University of Michigan. Her research is in economic development, urban environmental planning, and urban land use. Her current projects address what cities become following extensive abandonment, what institutions and relationships make a difference in what such cities become, and how planners can improve their practice in these cities. Her projects deal with how planners can address issues facing troubled industries, cities with high rates of poverty, and low-income neighborhoods. Dewar teaches courses where students studying for the Master of Urban Planning work with community partners, principally in Detroit and Flint, to produce plans that advance the agendas of those partners. She serves as Faculty Director for the Graduate Certificate in Real Estate Development. 

      Selected Publications

      Dewar, Margaret and Robert Linn. Forthcoming. “Remaking Brightmoor.” In Mapping Detroit, June Manning Thomas and Henco Bekkering, eds. Detroit: Wayne State University Press.

      Dewar, Margaret. 2013. Paying Employers to Hire Local Workers in Distressed Places. Economic Development Quarterly, 27 (November): 284-300.

      Dewar, Margaret, and June Manning Thomas, eds. 2013. The City After Abandonment. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.

      Dewar, Margaret and Matthew Weber. 2012. “City Abandonment.” In Oxford Handbook of Urban Planning, 563-586, Rachel Weber and Randall Crane, eds. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

      Morrison, Hunter and Margaret Dewar. 2012. “Planning in America’s Legacy Cities: Toward Better, Smaller Communities after Decline.” In Rebuilding America’s Legacy Cities: New Directions for the Industrial Heartland, 115-137, Alan Mallach, ed. New York: American Assembly.

      Dewar, Margaret. 2006. Selling Tax-Reverted Land: Lessons from Cleveland and Detroit. Journal of the American Planning Association, 72(2): 167-180.

      Emerging Scholar

      Theodore Eisenman

      x

      Assistant Professor of Landscape Architecture, University of Massachusetts Amherst

      About

      Theodore Eisenman, Ph.D., MLA, is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Landscape Architecture and Regional Planning at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. He was previously an Andrew W. Mellon Fellow in the Humanities Institute at the New York Botanical Garden, and his principal scholarly interest concerns the historical, scientific, cultural, and design bases of urban greening – defined here as the introduction or conservation of outdoor vegetation in cities. Theodore’s career spans research and practice with a range of federal, municipal, and nonprofit organizations. He has been a regular contributor to Landscape Architecture Magazine on ecological design topics and is currently a review editor for the urban ecology section of Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution. Raised in Sweden and the United States, and having worked as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Senegal, he is also interested in international affairs.

      Selected Publications

      Eisenman, T. S. (2016). Greening Cities in an Urbanizing Age: The Human Health Bases in the 19th and Early 21st Centuries. Change Over Time, In Press.

      Eisenman, T. S. (2016) [Review of The Ecological Design and Planning Reader, by F. O. Ndubisi]. Journal of Planning Education and Research, OnlineFirst.

      Eisenman, T. S. (2013). Frederick Law Olmsted, Green Infrastructure, and the Evolving City. Journal of Planning History, 12(4), 287–311.

      Eisenman, T. S. (2013). [Review of Greening Berlin: The Co-production of Science, Politics, and Urban Nature, by J. Lachmund]. Journal of Planning Literature, 28(3), 258–259.

      Eisenman, T. S. Anzevino, J., Rosenberg, S., & Spector, S. (Eds.). (2010). Revitalizing Hudson Riverfronts: Illustrated Conservation & Development Strategies for Creating Healthy, Prosperous Communities. Poughkeepsie, NY: Scenic Hudson.

       

      Faculty Fellow

      Kenneth Foster

      x

      Professor of Bioengineering

      About

      Kenneth Foster is Professor of Bioengineering in the School of Engineering and Applied Science. His research interests relate to biomedical applications of nonionizing radiation from audio through microwave frequency ranges, and health and safety aspects of electromagnetic fields as they interact with the body. Foster examines the prospects of workers in electrical occupations and the possibility (or lack of) cancer risk. Another and somewhat broader topic of interest is technological risk, and impact of technology (principally, electrotechnologies) on humans. His goal in this area is to examine technology, putting into perspective its relative risks and benefits to society. What he hopes to impart is a better perception of the social use of science.

      Selected Publications

      K. R. Foster and R. A. Tell, Radiofrequency exposures from Trilliant SmartMeter, Health Physics 105:177-186 (2013).

      K. R. Foster, A world awash with wireless devices. IEEE Microwave Magazine 14: 73-84 (2013).

      K. R. Foster and J. E. Moulder, Wi-Fi and Health: Review of Current Status of Research Health Physics 105:561-575 (2013).

      Faculty Fellow

      Raffaella Fabiani Giannetto

      x

      Assistant Professor

      About

      Raffaella Fabiani Giannetto is an Assistant Professor of Landscape Architecture in the School of Design. She is a landscape architecture historian whose current research interests focus on the Italian Renaissance garden, its legacy and historiography, as well as contemporary landscape architecture. Her first book, Medici Gardens: From Making to Design (University of Pennsylvania Press) was recognized by the Society of Architectural Historians with the Elisabeth Blair MacDougall Award in 2010. Fabiani Giannetto chaired the “Foreign Trends on American Soil” symposium at the School of Design, discussing the range of influences in American garden and landscape design since the eighteenth century. Prior to coming to Penn, she taught landscape architecture at the University of Maryland. Fabiani Giannetto is the recipient of a fellowship in Garden and Landscape Studies at Dumbarton Oaks for the year 2014-15. While at Dumbarton Oaks she will complete her new book project, "From Palladian Villa to American Plantation: Gardens and the Ideology of Country Living."

      Selected Publications

      Fabiani Giannetto, Raffaella, 2013. "The Use of History in Landscape Architectural Nostalgia," in Change Over Time An International Journal of Conservation and the Built Environment 3.1: 102-114.

      Fabiani Giannetto, Raffaella, 2011. "Grafting the Edelweiss on Cactus Plants: The 1931 Italian Garden Exhibition and Its Legacy," in Clio in the Italian Garden, Mirka Beneš and Michael Lee (eds.), Cambridge: Harvard University Press.

      Faculty Fellow

      Karen Glanz

      x

      George A. Weiss University Professor, Professor of Epidemiology and Nursing, School of Nursing, Perelman School of Medicine

      About

      Karen Glanz, PhD, MPH is George A. Weiss University Professor in the Perelman School of Medicine and the School of Nursing, and Director of the CDC-funded University of Pennsylvania Prevention Research Center. She was previously at Emory University (2004-2009), the University of Hawaii (1993 to 2004), and Temple University. A globally influential public health scholar whose work spans psychology, epidemiology, nutrition and other disciplines, her research in community and health care settings focuses on obesity, nutrition, and the built environment; chronic disease management and control; reducing health disparities; and health communication technologies.  Her research and publications about understanding, measuring and improving healthy food environments, beginning in the 1980’s, and have been widely recognized and replicated. In particular, she has led the development of the widely-used NEMS (Nutrition Environment Measures Survey) audit tools for assessing food environments in stores, restaurants, and other retail food settings. She is a member of the US Task Force on Community Preventive Services.  Dr. Glanz is senior editor of Health Behavior and Health Education: Theory, Research, and Practice (Jossey-Bass Inc.), a widely used text now in its fourth edition.  Dr. Glanz was elected to membership in the Institute of Medicine (IOM) of the National Academy of Sciences in 2013.  She was designated a Highly Cited Author by ISIHighlyCited.com, in the top 0.5% of authors in her field over a 20-year period.

      Selected Publications

      Foster G, Karpyn A, Wojtanowski A, Davis E, Weiss S, Brensinger C, Tierney A, Guo W, Brown J, Spross C, Leuchten D, Burns P, Glanz K.  Placement strategies to increase the sales of healthier products in supermarkets in low-income, ethnically-diverse neighborhoods: A randomized controlled trial.  American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 99: 1359-1368, 2014.

      Cavanaugh E, Green S, Mallya G, Tierney A, Brensinger C, Glanz K.  Changes in Food and Beverage Environments after an Urban Corner Store Intervention.  Preventive Medicine, 65:7-12, 2014.

      Lucan SC, Hillier A, Schechter CB, Glanz K.  Objective and self-reported factors associated with food environment perceptions and fruit-and-vegetable consumption:  A multilevel analysis.  Preventing Chronic Disease, 2014; 11: 130324.

      Kegler MC, Swan DW, Alcantara I, Feldman L, Glanz K.  The influence of rural home and neighborhood environments on healthy eating, physical activity, and weight.  Prevention Science, 2014; 15:1-11.

      Cannuscio CC, Tappe K, Hillier A, Buttenheim A, Karpyn A, Glanz K.  An assessment of the urban food environment and residents’ shopping behaviors in that environment.  American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 45: 606-614, 2013.

      Emerging Scholar

      Albert T. Han

      x

      Faculty of Environmental Design, University of Calgary

      About

      Albert Tonghoon Han is currently a postdoctoral research fellow with the University of Calgary’s Faculty of Environmental Design. His research focuses on studying how growth management, land use planning, and environmental policies affect the natural environment in metropolitan areas in the North America and other fast-growing cities around the world. He is also interested in studying how planning efforts based on market-based approaches can mitigate the impacts of climate change, particularly in regards to improving building energy efficiency in cities. Albert received his Ph.D. in City and Regional Planning from University of Pennsylvania in 2015. Prior to Penn, he worked on various global environmental projects at the Korea Environment Institute from 2011 to 2012. He obtained his master's degree in Urban and Regional Planning from the University of Iowa in 2011 with specialization in environmental planning and spatial analysis. His devotion to studying land use and environmental planning originated from his background in Life Science and Biotechnology from Korea University where he received his bachelor's degree in 2009.

      Bring our latest initiatives, publications and events to your inbox.