People

Penn IUR is affiliated with more than 200 experts in the field of urbanism. Its Faculty Fellows program identifies faculty at the University of Pennsylvania with a demonstrated interest in urban research; the Penn IUR Scholars program identifies urban scholars outside of Penn; and the Penn IUR Fellows program identifies expert urban practitioners. Together, these programs foster a community of scholars and encourage cross-disciplinary collaboration.

View by:
, ,
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
clear
Faculty Fellow

Francesca Ammon

x

Assistant Professor

About

Francesca Russello Ammon is Assistant Professor of City and Regional Planning and Historic Preservation in the School of Design. As a cultural historian of the built environment, her teaching, research, and writing focus on the changing shapes and spaces of the 20th- and 21st-century American city. She grounds her interdisciplinary approach to this subject in the premise that the landscape materializes social relations, cultural values, and economic processes. In particular, she is interested in the ways that visual culture informs planning and design, the dynamic relationships between cities and nature, and the politics of place and space. 

Before joining the School of Design faculty, Ammon was a Visiting Scholar at the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. She has also held the Sally Kress Tompkins Fellowship, jointly sponsored by the Society of Architectural Historians (SAH) and the Historic American Buildings Survey (HABS). While completing her Ph.D. in American Studies, she held long-term fellowships as a Whiting Fellow in the Humanities, Ambrose Monell Foundation Fellow in Technology and Democracy at the Miller Center of Public Affairs, and John E. Rovensky Fellow with the Business History Conference.

For the past year and a half, Ammon has been a Researcher on the Mellon Foundation-funded project on “Photography and/of Architecture” at the Canadian Centre for Architecture. She is also currently a colloquium member of the Penn/Mellon Foundation Humanities + Urbanism + Design Initiative, and she is a recent past fellow of Penn’s Price Lab for Digital Humanities. 

Ammon is on the board of the Society for American City and Regional Planning History (SACRPH).

Selected Publications

Ammon, Francesca Russello. 2016. Bulldozer: Demolition and Clearance of the Postwar Landscape. New Haven: Yale University Press.

Ammon, Francesca Russello. 2015. “Post-Industrialization and the City of Consumption: Attempted Revitalization in Asbury Park, New Jersey.” Journal of Urban History 41(2): 158-174.

Ammon, Francesca Russello. 2012. “Unearthing Benny the Bulldozer: The Culture of Clearance in Postwar Children’s Books.” Technology and Culture 53(2): 306-336.

Ammon, Francesca Russello. 2009. “Commemoration Amid Criticism: The Mixed Legacy of Urban Renewal in Southwest Washington, D.C.” Journal of Planning History 8(3): 175-220.

Faculty Fellow

David Barnes

x

Director of Health and Societies Major and Associate Professor

About

David Barnes is Associate Professor and Director of the Health and Societies Major in the Department of History and Sociology of Science in the School of Arts and Sciences, where he teaches the history of medicine and public health. Prior to joining Penn, Barnes taught for a year at the Institute for Liberal arts at Emory University and for seven years in the History of Science Department at Harvard University. His current research is concentrated in the history of infectious disease, epidemiology, and public health; nineteenth-century urban European social and cultural history; and the politics of international disease control programs. He has a forthcoming book on the history of the Lazaretto Quarantine Station, located outside of Philadelphia.

Selected Publications

Barnes, David. 2014. “Cargo, ‘Infection,’ Cargo, and the Logic of Quarantine in the Nineteenth Century.” Bulletin of the History of Medicine 88(1).

Barnes, David. 2010. “Targeting Patient Zero." In Tuberculosis Then and Now: Perspectives on the History of an Infectious Disease, 49-71, edited by Flurin Condrau and Michael Worboys.  Montreal, QC and Kingston, ON: McGill-Queen's University Press.

Barnes, David. 2006. The Great Stink of Paris and the Nineteenth-Century Struggle against Filth and Germs. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press.

Barnes, David. 2002. “Scents and Sensibilities: Disgust and the Meanings of Odors in Late Nineteenth-Century Paris." Historical Reflections/Réflexions historiques 28: 21-49.

Barnes, David. 1 995. The Making of a Social Disease: Tuberculosis in Nineteenth-Century France. University of California Press.

Faculty Fellow

David Brownlee

x

Frances Shapiro-Weitzenhoffer Professor of 19th Century European Art

About

David Brownlee is the Frances Shapiro-Weitzenhoffer Professor of 19th Centurey European Art in the History of Art in the School of Arts and Sciences. He is a historian of modern architecture whose interests embrace a wide range of subjects in Europe and America, from the late 18th century to the present. Brownlee has won numerous fellowships and his work has earned three major publication prizes from the Society of Architectural Historians. He is a recipient of the University of Pennsylvania’s Lindback Award for Distinguished Teaching. 

Selected Publications

Brownlee, David, and Derek Gillman. 2012. The Barnes Foundation: Two Buildings, One Mission. New York: Skira Rizzoli.

Brownlee, David, David De Long, and Kathryn Hiesinger. 2001. Out of the Ordinary: Robert Venturi, Denise Scott Brown and Associates: Architecture, Urbanism, Design. Philadelphia: Philadelphia Museum of Art.

Thomas, George and David Brownlee. 2000. Building America’s First University: An Historical and Architectural Guide to the University of Pennsylvania. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.

Brownlee, David. 1997. Making a Modern Classic: The Architecture of the Philadelphia Museum of Art. Philadelphia: Philadelphia Museum of Art.

Brownlee, David B. and David G. De Long. 1991. Louis I. Kahn: In the Realm of Architecture. New York: Rizzoli International Publications.

 

Emerging Scholar

Caroline Cheong

x

Assistant Professor, Department of History, University of Central Florida

About

Caroline Cheong is an assistant professor in the History Department at the University of Central Florida. Her research focuses on the relationship between urban heritage conservation and economic development, values-based conservation management, conservation economics and poverty reduction. She earned her PhD from the University of Pennsylvania in City and Regional Planning, her MS in Historic Preservation from the University of Pennsylvania and her BS in Anthropology from the University of Chicago. She was a US/ICOMOS International Exchange Intern in Al Houson, Jordan and a Graduate Intern at the Getty Conservation Institute where she evaluated the challenges and opportunities facing historic cities.  Previously, Caroline was the Director of Research for Heritage Strategies International and PlaceEconomics through which she published numerous research reports and professional publications focusing on the economic impacts of historic preservation with Donovan Rypkema.

Selected Publications

Macdonald, Susan and Caroline Cheong. The Role of Public-Private Partnerships in Conserving Heritage Buildings, Sites and Historic Urban Areas: A Literature Review. Los Angeles, CA: Getty Publications, 2014

Cheong, Caroline. Instruments for urban regeneration: Mixed-capital companies. (2014). Manuscript submitted for publication. Prepared for Eduardo Rojas.

Cheong, Caroline. Creative Cities and Place. (2013). Manuscript submitted for publication. Prepared for Donovan Rypkema, Erasmus University and the Ministry of Education, Culture and Science of the Netherlands.

Cheong, Caroline. Cruise Ship Tourism: Issues and Trends. Prepared for the World Monuments Fund for “Harboring Tourism: A Symposium on Cruise Ships in Historic Port Communities,” 2012.

Affiliated PhD Student

Lee Ann Custer

x

Doctoral Candidate, History of Art, University of Pennsylvania

About

Lee Ann Custer is a doctoral student in History of Art at the University of Pennsylvania. Her research interests include the urban vernacular built environment and modern architectural history. Before coming to Penn, Lee Ann worked on a variety of architecture and urban studies initiatives, including the BMW Guggenheim Lab at the Guggenheim Museum and Spontaneous Interventions: Design Actions for the Common Good at the American Pavilion of the 13th Venice Architecture Biennale. Additionally, she has worked for SO – IL architects in New York, as well as for museum planning consultants Lord Cultural Resources. Lee Ann holds a BA in History of Art and Architecture from Harvard University, where she graduated magna cum laude with highest honors. 

Faculty Fellow

Raffaella Fabiani Giannetto

x

Assistant Professor

About

Raffaella Fabiani Giannetto is Assistant Professor of Landscape Architecture in the School of Design. She is a landscape architecture historian whose research interests focus on the Italian Renaissance garden, its legacy and historiography, as well as contemporary landscape architecture. Her first book, Medici Gardens: From Making to Design (University of Pennsylvania Press) won the Elisabeth Blair MacDougall Book of the Year Award in 2010. Prior to coming to Penn, she taught landscape architecture at the University of Maryland and at the Ohio State University. Fabiani Giannetto is currently working on a new manuscript titled Georgic Grounds and Gardens: From Palladio’s Villas to American Plantations, which examines the role of England in the transmission of ideas about gardens and agriculture from 16th-century Veneto to colonial America. An offspring of her research is the theme of conference she will host at the School of Design in November 2017, The Culture of Cultivation: Designing with Agriculture. 

Selected Publications

Fabiani Giannetto, Raffaella. 2016. Foreign Trends in American Gardens: A History of Exchange, Adaptation and Reception. University of Virginia Press.

Fabiani Giannetto, Raffaella. 2013. "The Use of History in Landscape Architectural Nostalgia." Change Over Time: An International Journal of Conservation and the Built Environment 3(1): 102-114.

Fabiani Giannetto, Raffaella. 2011. “Grafting the Edelweiss on Cactus Plants: The 1931 Italian Garden Exhibition and Its Legacy." In Clio in the Italian Garden, edited by Mirka Beneš and Michael Lee. Cambridge: Harvard University Press.

Fabiani Giannetto, Raffaella. 2009. Paolo Bürgi Landscape Architect, Discovering the (Swiss) Horizon: Mountain, Lake, and Forest. Princeton Architectural Press.

Fabiani Giannetto, Raffaella. 2008. Medici Gardens: From Making to Design. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.

Faculty Fellow

Joseph Gyourko

x

Martin Bucksbaum Professor of Real Estate, Finance, and Business and Public Policy

Nancy Nasher and David Haemiseggar Director, Zell/Lurie Real Estate Center

About

Joe Gyourko is the Martin Bucksbaum Professor of Real Estate, Finance and Business & Public Policy at The Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. He also serves as the Nancy Nasher and David Haemiseggar Director of the Zell/Lurie Real Estate Center at Wharton. Professor Gyourko’s research interests include real estate finance and investments, urban economics, and housing markets, in the United States and China. He is a Research Associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) and served as Co-Director of the special NBER Project on Housing Markets and the Financial Crisis. Professor Gyourko served as co-editor of the Journal of Urban Economics, is a past Trustee of the Urban Land Institute (ULI) and Director of the Pension Real Estate Association (PREA), and consults to various private firms on real estate investment and policy matters. He received his B.A. from Duke University and a Ph.D. in Economics from the University of Chicago.

Selected Publications

Gyourko, Joseph and Edward Glaeser. Forthcoming. “The Economics of Housing Supply.” Journal of Economic Perspectives.

Wu, Jing, Joseph Gyourko, and Yongheng Deng. 2016. “Evaluating the Risk of Chinese Housing Markets: What We Know and What We Need to Know.” China Economic Review 39: 91-114.

Gyourko, Joseph and Raven Molloy. 2015. “Regulation and Housing Supply.” In Handbook of Regional and Urban Economics Vol 5A, edited by Gilles Duranton, J. Vernon Henderson, and William Strange. Amsterdam, The Netherlands: Elsevier.

Gyourko, Joseph, Chris Mayer, and Todd Sinai. 2013. “Superstar Cities.” American Economic Journal-Economic Policy 5(4): 167-199.

Faculty Fellow

Ira Harkavy

x

Associate Vice President and Founding Director of the Barbara and Edward Netter Center for Community Partnerships 

Areas of Interest

    About

    Ira Harkavy is Associate Vice President and Founding Director of the Barbara and Edward Netter Center for Community Partnerships. Harkavy teaches in the departments of history, urban studies, and Africana studies, and in the Graduate School of Education. As Director of the Netter Center since 1992, Harkavy has helped to develop academically based community service courses, as well as participatory action research projects, that involve creating university-community partnerships and university-assisted community schools in Penn's local community of West Philadelphia. Harkavy is Chair of the National Science Foundation’s Committee on Equal Opportunities in Science and Engineering (CEOSE); US Chair of the International Consortium on Higher Education, Civic Responsibility, and Democracy; and Chair of the Anchor Institutions Task Force. He has co-edited and co-authored seven books, and has written and lectured widely on the history and current practice of urban university-community-school partnerships and strategies for integrating the university missions of research, teaching, learning, and service. Among other honors, Harkavy is the recipient of the University of Pennsylvania’s Alumni Award of Merit, Campus Compact’s Thomas Ehrlich Faculty Award for Service Learning, a Fulbright Senior Specialist Grant, and two honorary degrees.

    Selected Publications

    Benson, Lee, Ira Harkavy, John Puckett, Matthew Hartley, Rita A. Hodges, Francis E. Johnston, and Joann Weeks. 2017. Knowledge for Social Change: Bacon, Dewey, and the Revolutionary Transformation of Research Universities in the Twenty-First Century. Philadelphia, PA: Temple University Press.

    Bergan, Sjur, Tony Gallagher, and Ira Harkavy, eds. 2016. Higher Education for Democratic Innovation. Strasbourg: Council of Europe Publishing.

    Harkavy, Ira. 2016. “Engaging Urban Universities as Anchor Institutions for Health Equity” editorial in American Journal of Public Health. Washington, DC: American Public Health Association Publications. 106(12): 2155–2157.

    Harkavy, Ira, Nancy Cantor, and Myra Burnett, “Realizing STEM Equity and Diversity through Higher Education-Community Engagement,” white paper based on work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant no. 1219996, January 2015, available at http://www.nettercenter.upenn.edu.

    Harkavy, Ira, Matthew Hartley, Rita Hodges and Joann Weeks. 2013. “The Promise of University-Assisted Community Schools to Transform American Schooling: A Report from the Field, 1985-2012.” Peabody Journal of Education 88:5 (2013): 525-540. 

    Faculty Fellow

    Renata Holod

    x

    College of Women Class of 1963 Term Professor in the Humanities

    Curator, Near East Section, Penn Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology

    About

    Renata Holod is College of Women Class of 1963 Term Professor in the Humanities, History of Art Department; and Curator in the Near East Section, Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, both at the University of Pennsylvania. She has carried out archeological and architectural fieldwork in Syria, Iran, Morocco, Turkey, Central Asia, Tunisia, and Ukraine.

    She is co-author and co-editor of City in the Desert (1978); Architecture and Community: Building in the Islamic World Today, Aperture, New York, (1983); The Mosque and the Modern World (1997); The City in the Islamic World (2008) and An Island Through Time: Jerba Studies (2009).

    She was Convenor, Steering Committee Member, and Chair, Master Jury of the Aga Khan Award for Architecture; and was Director, Assessment Board, Aga Khan Trust for Culture, 2012-2013.

    She sits on several advisory boards including the Fondation Max Van Berchem, Muqarnas, Annual in Islamic Art and Visual Culture; International Journal of Islamic Architecture; Ars Asiatiques; and Center for the Study of Material and Visual Cultures of Religion, Yale University. She has served as President, Board of Trustees at The Ukrainian Museum June 2013 - June 2017. 

    Selected Publications

    Jayyuusi, Salma Khadra, Renata Holod, Attilio Petruccioli, Andre Raymond. 2008. The City in the Islamic World. Brill Academic Pub.

    Holod, Renata and Hasan-Uddin Khan. 1997. The Mosque and the Modern World: Architects, Patrons, and Designs Since the 1950s. Thames and Hudson.

    Holod, Renata, Hmet Evin, and Suha Özkan, eds. 1984. Modern Turkish Architecture, 1st ed. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.

    Holod, Renata. 1983. Architecture and Community: Building in the Islamic World Today: The Aga Khan Award for Architecture. New York: Aperture.

    Grabar, Oleg, Renata Holod, James Knustad, and William Trousdale. 1978. City in the Desert: An Account of the Archaeological Expedition to Qasr al-Hayr al-Sharqi, Syria. Harvard Middle East Monograph Series 23/24. Cambridge: Harvard University Press.

    Penn IUR Scholar

    Ken Jackson

    x

    Jacques Barzun Professor in History and the Social Sciences, Department of History

    Director, Herbert H. Lehman Center for American History, Columbia University

    About

    Ken Jackson is the Jacques Barzun Professor in History and the Social Sciences in the Department of History and the Director of the Herbert H. Lehman Center for American History at Columbia University. He was formerly the Chair of the Department of History. Jackson’s areas of expertise include urban, social, and military history. He has served as President for several organizations, including the Urban History Association and the Society of American Historians, and is the recipient of many awards, including the Bancroft Prize and the Francis Parkman Prize for his book “Crabgrass Frontier.” His research and work largely focus on the urban history of New York City. Jackson has been affiliated with many organizations, including the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the New York Historical Society, the National Council for History Education, and the Society of American Historians. At Columbia, Jackson teaches the class “The History of New York,” well known for its midnight bike ride from campus to Brooklyn. 

    Selected Publications

    Jackson, Ken. 1996. All the World's a Mall: Reflections on the Social and Economic Consequences of the American Shopping Center. American Historical Review, October: 1111-1121.

    Jackson, Ken. 1998. NCHE: Where School and University Meet. The History Teacher,  February.

    Jackson, Ken. 1998. Manila John of Guadacanal: Hero of the Pacific War. In Forgotten Heroes of American History, Susan Ware, ed. New York: Basic Books.

    Faculty Fellow

    David Young Kim

    x

    Assistant Professor of Art History

    About

    David Young Kim is Assistant Professor in the Department of History of Art in the School of Arts and Sciences. He teaches and researches Southern Renaissance art, with a focus on art literature, transcultural exchange, and material culture. He received his B.A. in English and French literature from Amherst College (1999) and his M.A. and Ph.D. from Harvard (2009), in addition to attending the Humboldt University in Berlin and the Université Paris Diderot-Paris 7. Before joining the Penn faculty in 2013, he was a postdoctoral faculty fellow (wissenschaftlicher Assistent) at the University of Zurich in Switzerland (2009-2013) and a visiting faculty member at the Universidade Federal de São Paulo in Brazil (2011-2013). In May 2017, he delivered the Tomàs Harris Lectures at the University College London. He received the 2017 Dean’s Award for Innovation in Teaching for his contributions to undergraduate education.

    Selected Publications

    Kim, David. Forthcoming. Authenticity and Art as Object: A Handbook of Terms. [compilation of keyword entries written by art history grad students as part of Mellon Object-Based Study Initiatives]

    Kim, David. Forthcoming. “Stonework and Crack in Giovanni Bellini’s St. Francis in the Wilderness.” In Steinformen. Materialität, Qualität, Imitation, edited by Isabella Augart, Maurice Saß, and Iris Wenderholm. Berlin / Boston: De Gruyter.

    Kim, David. Forthcoming. “The Triumph and Pathos of Perspective.” In Urban Artefacts: Triumphal Arches and the Paragone between the Arts, edited by Alina Payne. Pisa: Scuola Normale di Pisa Press.

    Kim, David. 2014. The Traveling Artist in the Italian Renaissance. New Haven: Yale University Press.

    Kim, David Y, ed. 2013. Matters of Weight: Force, Gravity, and Aesthetics in the Early Modern Period. Berlin: Edition Imorde.

    Penn IUR Scholar

    Scott Gabriel Knowles

    x

    Associate Professor, Interim Department Head for History, Department of History and Politics

    Director, Great Works Symposium, Drexel University

    Areas of Interest

      About

      Scott Gabriel Knowles is Associate Professor and Interim Department Head for History in the Department of History and Politics at Drexel University. His current research focuses on mitigating disaster risk in modern cities through technology and public policy, a topic on which he has written extensively. Knowles is also a Research Fellow with the Disaster Research Center at the University of Delaware and member of the Fukushima Forum collaborative research community. Additionally, he serves on Philadelphia Mayor Michael A. Nutter's Special Advisory Commission on Licenses and Inspections.

      Selected Publications

      Knowles, Scott Gabriel. 2011. The Disaster Experts: Mastering Risk in Modern America. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.

      Knowles, Scott Gabriel, ed. 2009. Imagining Philadelphia: Edmund Bacon and the Future of the City. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.

      Knowles, Scott Gabriel. 2007. Defending Philadelphia: A Historical Case Study of Civil Defense in the Early Cold War. Public Works Management and Policy, January: 1-16.

      Knowles, Scott Gabriel. 2003. Lessons in the Rubble: The World Trade Center and the History of Disaster Investigations in the United States. History and Technology, Spring: 9-28.

      Kargon, Robert H. and Scott Gabriel Knowles. 2202. Knowledge for Use: Science, Higher Education, and America’s New Industrial Heartland, 1880-1915. Annals of Science, January: 1-20. 

      Bring our latest initiatives, publications and events to your inbox.