People

Penn IUR is affiliated with more than 200 experts in the field of urbanism. Its Faculty Fellows program identifies faculty at the University of Pennsylvania with a demonstrated interest in urban research; the Penn IUR Scholars program identifies urban scholars outside of Penn; and the Penn IUR Fellows program identifies expert urban practitioners. Together, these programs foster a community of scholars and encourage cross-disciplinary collaboration.

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Faculty Fellow

David S. Barnes

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Director, Health & Societies Program and Associate Professor

About

David Barnes is an Associate Professor and Director of the Health & Societies Program in the Department of History and Sociology of Science in the School of Arts and Sciences, where he teaches the history of medicine and public health. Prior to his time at Penn, Barnes taught for a year at the Institute for Liberal arts at Emory University and for seven years in the History of Science Department at Harvard University. His current research is concentrated in the history of infectious disease, epidemiology, and public health; nineteenth-century urban European social and cultural history; and the politics of international disease control programs. He has a forthcoming book on the history of the Lazaretto Quarantine Station, located outside of Philadelphia.

Selected Publications

Barnes, David. 2006. The Great Stink of Paris and the Nineteenth-Century Struggle against Filth and Germs. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press.

Barnes, David. 2002. Scents and Sensibilities: Disgust and the Meanings of Odors in Late Nineteenth-Century Paris." Historical Reflections/Réflexions historiques, 28 : 21-49.

Barnes, David. 2000. Historical Perspectives on the Etiology of Tuberculosis. Microbes and Infection, 2: 431-440.

Barnes, David. 1995. The Making of a Social Disease: Tuberculosis in Nineteenth-Century France. Berkley, CA: University of California Press.

Faculty Fellow

David Brownlee

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Frances Shapiro-Weitzenhoffer Professor, Chair of the Graduate Group in the History of Art

School/Department

Areas of Interest

    About

    David Brownlee is Frances Shapiro-Weitzenhoffer Professor and Chair of the Graduate Group in the History of Art in the School of Arts and Sciences. He is a historian of modern architecture whose interests embrace a wide range of subjects in Europe and America, from the late eighteenth century to the present. Brownlee has won numerous fellowships, and his work has earned three major publication prizes from the Society of Architectural Historians. He is a recipient of the University of Pennsylvania’s Lindback Award for Distinguished Teaching. 

    Selected Publications

    Brownlee, David, and Derek Gillman. 2012. The Barnes Foundation: Two Buildings, One Mission. New York: Skira Rizzoli.

    Brownlee, David, David De Long, and Kathryn Hiesinger. 2001. Out of the Ordinary: Robert Venturi, Denise Scott Brown and Associates: Architecture, Urbanism, Design. Philadelphia: Philadelphia Museum of Art.

    Thomas, George and David Brownlee. 2000. Building America’s First University: An Historical and Architectural Guide to the University of Pennsylvania. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.

    Brownlee, David. 1997. Making a Modern Classic: The Architecture of the Philadelphia Museum of Art. Philadelphia: Philadelphia Museum of Art.

    Brownlee, David B. and David G. De Long. 1991. Louis I. Kahn: In the Realm of Architecture. New York: Rizzoli International Publications.

    Brownlee, David. 1989. Building the City Beautiful: The Benjamin Franklin Parkway and the Philadelphia Museum of Art. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press. 

    Emerging Scholar

    Caroline Cheong

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    Assistant Professor, Department of History, University of Central Florida

    About

    Caroline Cheong is an assistant professor in the History Department at the University of Central Florida. Her research focuses on the relationship between urban heritage conservation and economic development, values-based conservation management, conservation economics and poverty reduction. She earned her PhD from the University of Pennsylvania in City and Regional Planning, her MS in Historic Preservation from the University of Pennsylvania and her BS in Anthropology from the University of Chicago. She was a US/ICOMOS International Exchange Intern in Al Houson, Jordan and a Graduate Intern at the Getty Conservation Institute where she evaluated the challenges and opportunities facing historic cities.  Previously, Caroline was the Director of Research for Heritage Strategies International and PlaceEconomics through which she published numerous research reports and professional publications focusing on the economic impacts of historic preservation with Donovan Rypkema.

    Selected Publications

    Macdonald, Susan and Caroline Cheong. The Role of Public-Private Partnerships in Conserving Heritage Buildings, Sites and Historic Urban Areas: A Literature Review. Los Angeles, CA: Getty Publications, 2014

    Cheong, Caroline. Instruments for urban regeneration: Mixed-capital companies. (2014). Manuscript submitted for publication. Prepared for Eduardo Rojas.

    Cheong, Caroline. Creative Cities and Place. (2013). Manuscript submitted for publication. Prepared for Donovan Rypkema, Erasmus University and the Ministry of Education, Culture and Science of the Netherlands.

    Cheong, Caroline. Cruise Ship Tourism: Issues and Trends. Prepared for the World Monuments Fund for “Harboring Tourism: A Symposium on Cruise Ships in Historic Port Communities,” 2012.

    Affiliated PhD Student

    Lee Ann Custer

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    Doctoral Candidate, History of Art, University of Pennsylvania

    About

    Lee Ann Custer is a doctoral student in History of Art at the University of Pennsylvania. Her research interests include the urban vernacular built environment and modern architectural history. Before coming to Penn, Lee Ann worked on a variety of architecture and urban studies initiatives, including the BMW Guggenheim Lab at the Guggenheim Museum and Spontaneous Interventions: Design Actions for the Common Good at the American Pavilion of the 13th Venice Architecture Biennale. Additionally, she has worked for SO – IL architects in New York, as well as for museum planning consultants Lord Cultural Resources. Lee Ann holds a BA in History of Art and Architecture from Harvard University, where she graduated magna cum laude with highest honors. 

    Faculty Fellow

    Raffaella Fabiani Giannetto

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    Assistant Professor

    About

    Raffaella Fabiani Giannetto is an Assistant Professor of Landscape Architecture in the School of Design. She is a landscape architecture historian whose current research interests focus on the Italian Renaissance garden, its legacy and historiography, as well as contemporary landscape architecture. Her first book, Medici Gardens: From Making to Design (University of Pennsylvania Press) was recognized by the Society of Architectural Historians with the Elisabeth Blair MacDougall Award in 2010. Fabiani Giannetto chaired the “Foreign Trends on American Soil” symposium at the School of Design, discussing the range of influences in American garden and landscape design since the eighteenth century. Prior to coming to Penn, she taught landscape architecture at the University of Maryland. Fabiani Giannetto is the recipient of a fellowship in Garden and Landscape Studies at Dumbarton Oaks for the year 2014-15. While at Dumbarton Oaks she will complete her new book project, "From Palladian Villa to American Plantation: Gardens and the Ideology of Country Living."

    Selected Publications

    Fabiani Giannetto, Raffaella, 2013. "The Use of History in Landscape Architectural Nostalgia," in Change Over Time An International Journal of Conservation and the Built Environment 3.1: 102-114.

    Fabiani Giannetto, Raffaella, 2011. "Grafting the Edelweiss on Cactus Plants: The 1931 Italian Garden Exhibition and Its Legacy," in Clio in the Italian Garden, Mirka Beneš and Michael Lee (eds.), Cambridge: Harvard University Press.

    Faculty Fellow

    Ira Harkavy

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    Associate Vice President and Founding Director of the Barbara and Edward Netter Center for Community Partnerships

    Areas of Interest

      About

      Ira Harkavy is Associate Vice President and Founding Director of the Barbara and Edward Netter Center for Community Partnerships. An historian with extensive experience building university-community-school partnerships, Harkavy teaches in the departments of history, urban studies, and Africana studies, and in the Graduate School of Education.  As Director of the Netter Center since 1992, Harkavy has helped to develop academically based community service courses, as well as participatory action research projects, that involve creating university-community partnerships and university-assisted community schools in Penn's local community of West Philadelphia. The executive editor of Universities and Community Schools, Harkavy has written and lectured widely on the history and current practice of urban university-community-school partnerships and strategies for integrating the university missions of teaching, research, and service. Since 2007, he has co-authored or co-edited the several books on university civic engagement.

      Selected Publications

      Berganm, Sjur, Ira Harkavy, Hilligje van’t Land. 2013. Reimagining Democratic Societies. Strasbourg: Council of Europe Publishing.

      Hartley, Matthew Hartley, Vivian Gadsden, Ira Harkavy, and Rita Hodges. 2013. “Leadership and Diversity: Leading Institutional Change to Promote a Diverse Democracy.” In Leadership and Governance in Higher Education. Berlin: RAABE Academic Publishers.

      Johnston, Francis E. and Ira Harkavy. 2009. The Obesity Culture: Strategies for Change. Public Health and University-Community Partnerships. Smith-Gordon.

      Benson, Lee, John Puckett, and Ira Harkavy. 2007. Dewey’s Dream: Universities and Democracies in an Age of Education Reform. Temple Press.

      Huber, Josef and Ira Harkavy. 2007. Higher Education and Democratic Culture: Citizenship, Human Rights and Civic Responsibility. Council of Europe Publishing. 

      Faculty Fellow

      Renata Holod

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      College of Women Class of 1963 Professor, History of Art, School of Arts and Sciences

      Curator, Near East Section, Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology

      About

      Renata Holod is Professor of the History of Art in the School of Arts and Sciences, and Curator of the Near East Section in the Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology. She is an affiliated faculty member with the School of Arts and Science’s Middle East Center. Holod has done archaeological and architectural fieldwork in Syria, Iran, Morocco, Central Asia and Turkey, and completed an archaeological/ethno-historical survey on the island of Jerba, Tunisia. She has served as Convenor, Steering Committee Member, and Master Jury Chair of the Aga Khan Award for Architecture. She also served as consultant to Skidmore, Owings and Merrill (SOM), Arthur Ericson Architects, Venturi Scott-Brown Architects, Mitchell/Giurgola Associates, H2L2, and Michael Graves& Associates, and the Center for Architecture in NYC. In 2004, the Islamic Environmental Research Centre honored her with an Award for outstanding work in Islamic Architectural Studies. In 2010, she received the Provost’s Award for Distinguished Ph.D. Teaching and Mentoring.

      Selected Publications

      Grabar, Oleg, Renata Holod, James Knustad, and William Trousdale. 1978. City in the Desert: An Account of the Archaeological Expedition to Qasr al-Hayr al-Sharqi, Syria. Harvard Middle East Monograph Series 23/24. Cambridge: Harvard University Press.

      Holod, Renata. 1983. Architecture and Community: Building in the Islamic World Today: The Aga Khan Award for Architecture. New York: Aperture.

      Holod, Renata, Hmet Evin, and Suha Özkan, eds. 1984. Modern Turkish Architecture, 1st ed. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.

      Holod, Renata and Hasan-Uddin Khan. 1997. The Mosque and the Modern World: rchitects, Patrons and Designs Since the 1950s. Thames and Hudson.

      Jayyuusi, Salma Khadra, Renata Holod, Attilio Petruccioli, Andre Raymond. 2008. The City in the Islamic World. Brill Academic Pub.

      Penn IUR Scholar

      Ken Jackson

      x

      Jacques Barzun Professor in History and the Social Sciences, Department of History

      Director, Herbert H. Lehman Center for American History, Columbia University

      About

      Ken Jackson is the Jacques Barzun Professor in History and the Social Sciences in the Department of History and the Director of the Herbert H. Lehman Center for American History at Columbia University. He was formerly the Chair of the Department of History. Jackson’s areas of expertise include urban, social, and military history. He has served as President for several organizations, including the Urban History Association and the Society of American Historians, and is the recipient of many awards, including the Bancroft Prize and the Francis Parkman Prize for his book “Crabgrass Frontier.” His research and work largely focus on the urban history of New York City. Jackson has been affiliated with many organizations, including the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the New York Historical Society, the National Council for History Education, and the Society of American Historians. At Columbia, Jackson teaches the class “The History of New York,” well known for its midnight bike ride from campus to Brooklyn. 

      Selected Publications

      Jackson, Ken. 1996. All the World's a Mall: Reflections on the Social and Economic Consequences of the American Shopping Center. American Historical Review, October: 1111-1121.

      Jackson, Ken. 1998. NCHE: Where School and University Meet. The History Teacher,  February.

      Jackson, Ken. 1998. Manila John of Guadacanal: Hero of the Pacific War. In Forgotten Heroes of American History, Susan Ware, ed. New York: Basic Books.

      Faculty Fellow

      David Young Kim

      x

      Assistant Professor of Art History

      About

      David Young Kim is Assistant Professor in the Department of History of Art in the School of Arts and Sciences. He teaches Southern Renaissance art, with a focus on the issues of cross-cultural exchange, geography, art literature, and material culture. Before joining the Penn faculty in 2013, he was a visiting faculty member at the Universidade Federal de São Paulo and a postdoctoral faculty fellow at the University of Zurich in Switzerland. He has published essays on topics such as cartographic images of the New World, cross-cultural exchange in the Mediterranean, and architectural representation. His next project, provisionally called The Texture of Painting, will investigate the connections between material surface, craft, and the decorative arts in the works of Northern Italian artists.

      Selected Publications

      Kim, David. 2014, forthcoming. The Traveling Artist in the Italian Renaissance.

      Kim, David Y, ed. 2014. Matters of Weight: Force, Gravity, and Aesthetics in the Early Modern Period. Berlin: Imorde.

      Kim, David Y. 2011. The Horror of Mimesis. The Oxford Art Journal, 34(3): 335-353.

      Kim, David Y. 2011. Thinking with the Senses. The Oxford Art Journal, 34(1): 132-135.

      Kim, David Y. 2006. Uneasy Reflections: Images of Venice and Tenochtitlan in Benedetto Bordone's “Isolario.” RES: Anthropology and Aesthetics, 49/50: 80-91.

      Penn IUR Scholar

      Scott Gabriel Knowles

      x

      Associate Professor, Interim Department Head for History, Department of History and Politics

      Director, Great Works Symposium, Drexel University

      Areas of Interest

        About

        Scott Gabriel Knowles is Associate Professor and Interim Department Head for History in the Department of History and Politics at Drexel University. His current research focuses on mitigating disaster risk in modern cities through technology and public policy, a topic on which he has written extensively. Knowles is also a Research Fellow with the Disaster Research Center at the University of Delaware and member of the Fukushima Forum collaborative research community. Additionally, he serves on Philadelphia Mayor Michael A. Nutter's Special Advisory Commission on Licenses and Inspections.

        Selected Publications

        Knowles, Scott Gabriel. 2011. The Disaster Experts: Mastering Risk in Modern America. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.

        Knowles, Scott Gabriel, ed. 2009. Imagining Philadelphia: Edmund Bacon and the Future of the City. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.

        Knowles, Scott Gabriel. 2007. Defending Philadelphia: A Historical Case Study of Civil Defense in the Early Cold War. Public Works Management and Policy, January: 1-16.

        Knowles, Scott Gabriel. 2003. Lessons in the Rubble: The World Trade Center and the History of Disaster Investigations in the United States. History and Technology, Spring: 9-28.

        Kargon, Robert H. and Scott Gabriel Knowles. 2202. Knowledge for Use: Science, Higher Education, and America’s New Industrial Heartland, 1880-1915. Annals of Science, January: 1-20. 

        Faculty Fellow

        David Leatherbarrow

        x

        Professor of Architecture

        School/Department

        Areas of Interest

          About

          David Leatherbarrow is Professor of Architecture in the Department of Architecture in the School of Design. He teaches courses in architectural theory and design studios in the graduate and undergraduate programs, supervises research, and directs the Ph.D. program. His primary research interests include history and theory of architecture and the city. Prior to coming to Penn, Leatherbarrow taught theory and design at the Polytechnic of Central London and Cambridge University, England. He is the recipient of the Visiting Scholar Fellowship from the Canadian Center of Architecture (1997-98). 

          Selected Publications

          Leatherbarrow, David. 2004. Topographical Stories: Studies in Landscape and Architecture. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.

          Leatherbarrow, David. 2002. Uncommon Ground: Architecture, Technology, Topography. Cambridge: MIT Press.

          Leatherbarrow, David. 1993. Roots of Architectural Invention: Site, Enclosure, Materials. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.

          Mostafavi, Moshen, and David Leatherbarrow. 1993. On Weathering: The Life of Buildings in Time. Cambridge: MIT Press.

          Faculty Fellow

          Lynn Hollen Lees

          x

          Professor of History Emeritus

          Areas of Interest

            About

            Lynn Hollen Lees is Professor of History Emeritus, having retired in 2013 from her position as Vice Provost for Faculty after serving for several years as co-director of the Joseph H. Lauder Institute of Management and International Studies. Her teaching was primarily in the fields of British history, European social history, and world history. She has spent time as an exchange Professor at University College London, Catholic University of Leuven, and the University of Diponegoro in Indonesia, and was Chair of the Department of History between 1995 and 2001. Her research centers on European cities, their social organization, and their welfare institutions. 

            Selected Publications

            Lees, Lynn Hollen. 1979. Exiles of Erin: Irish Migrants in Victorian London.

            Lees, Lynn Hollen. 1979. The Solidarities of Strangers: The British Poor Laws and the People. 1700-1948. Cambridge.

            Lees, Lynn Hollen and Paul Hohenberg. 1995. The Making of Urban Europe, 1000-1995.  

            Crossley, Pamela K., Lynn Hollen Lees, and John W. Servos. 2007. Global Society: The World Since 1900 (2nd edition).

            Lees, Lynn Hollen and Andrew Lees. 2007. Cities and the Making of Modern Europe, 1750-1914. Cambridge University Press.

            Lees, Lynn Hollen and Andrew Lees. 2012. “European Cities, 1800-2000." In Oxford Handbook of Cities in World History, Peter Clark, ed. Oxford University Press.

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