People

Penn IUR is affiliated with more than 200 experts in the field of urbanism. Its Faculty Fellows program identifies faculty at the University of Pennsylvania with a demonstrated interest in urban research; the Penn IUR Scholars program identifies urban scholars outside of Penn; and the Penn IUR Fellows program identifies expert urban practitioners. Together, these programs foster a community of scholars and encourage cross-disciplinary collaboration.

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Emerging Scholar

Arthur Acolin

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Assistant Professor, Department of Real Estate, University of Washington

Areas of Interest

    About

    Arthur Acolin is an Assistant Professor of Real Estate at the University of Washington with a broad interest in housing economics and a focus on international housing policy and finance. He completed his PhD in Urban Planning and Development at the University of Southern California in 2017. Recent research projects include a study of the presence of discrimination against different immigrant groups in the rental market in France with Raphael Bostic and Gary Painter, an examination of the effect of non-traditional mortgages on homeownership in the US with Xudong An, Raphael Bostic and Susan Wachter and the development of housing affordability indicators incorporating location for the metropolitan region of Sao Paulo, Brazil with Richard Green. Prior to doing his Ph.D., Acolin was a Research Associate at the Penn Institute for Urban Research working on housing, urbanization and economic development issues. He obtained a master in Urban Policy from the London School of Economics and Sciences Po Paris and an undergraduate degree in Urban Studies from the University of Pennsylvania.

    Selected Publications

    Acolin, Arthur, and Domenic Vitiello. "Who owns Chinatown: Neighbourhood preservation and change in Boston and Philadelphia." Urban Studies (2017): 0042098017699366.

    Acolin, Arthur, Xudong An, Raphael W. Bostic, and Susan M. Wachter. "Homeownership and Nontraditional and Subprime Mortgages." Housing Policy Debate 27.3 (2017): 393-418.

    Acolin, Arthur, Raphael Bostic, and Gary Painter. "A field study of rental market discrimination across origins in France." Journal of Urban Economics 95 (2016): 49-63.

    Acolin, Arthur, Jesse Bricker, Paul Calem, and Susan Wachter. "Borrowing constraints and homeownership." The American Economic Review 106.5 (2016): 625-629.

    Acolin, Arthur, and Richard K. Green. "Measuring housing affordability in São Paulo metropolitan region: Incorporating location." Cities 62 (2017): 41-49.

    Faculty Fellow

    Stefan Al

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    Professor of Urban Design, University of Pennsylvania

    About

    Stefan Al is a Dutch architect, Associate Professor of Urban Design at the University of Pennsylvania, and founder of Stefan Al Architects, a firm dedicated to sustainable design. Al has worked as a practicing architect on renowned projects such as the 600-meter tall Canton Tower in Guangzhou, the preservation of world heritage in Latin America at the World Heritage Center of UNESCO, and an 11,000-acre new eco-friendly city in India. He served as an advisor to the Government of Hong Kong’s Harbourfront Commission and Environment Bureau.

    Al’s research focuses on urbanization in developing countries and the evolution of urban form. His articles have been published in the Handbook of Architectural Theory, the Berkeley Planning Journal, Urban China, and other publications. He has edited the books Factory Towns of South China and Villages in the City, and is currently writing a book on Las Vegas called The Strip. Prior to joining Penn, Al has taught at UC Berkeley and the University of Hong Kong, where he was the director of the Urban Design Program. 

    Selected Publications

    Al, Stefan, ed. 2014. Villages in the City: A Guide to South China’s Informal Settlements. University of Hawaii Press; Hong Kong University Press.

    Al, Stefan, ed. 2012. Factory Towns of South China: An Illustrated Guidebook. Hong Kong University Press.

    Faculty Fellow

    David S. Barnes

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    Director, Health & Societies Program and Associate Professor

    About

    David Barnes is an Associate Professor and Director of the Health & Societies Program in the Department of History and Sociology of Science in the School of Arts and Sciences, where he teaches the history of medicine and public health. Prior to his time at Penn, Barnes taught for a year at the Institute for Liberal arts at Emory University and for seven years in the History of Science Department at Harvard University. His current research is concentrated in the history of infectious disease, epidemiology, and public health; nineteenth-century urban European social and cultural history; and the politics of international disease control programs. He has a forthcoming book on the history of the Lazaretto Quarantine Station, located outside of Philadelphia.

    Selected Publications

    Barnes, David. 2006. The Great Stink of Paris and the Nineteenth-Century Struggle against Filth and Germs. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press.

    Barnes, David. 2002. Scents and Sensibilities: Disgust and the Meanings of Odors in Late Nineteenth-Century Paris." Historical Reflections/Réflexions historiques, 28 : 21-49.

    Barnes, David. 2000. Historical Perspectives on the Etiology of Tuberculosis. Microbes and Infection, 2: 431-440.

    Barnes, David. 1995. The Making of a Social Disease: Tuberculosis in Nineteenth-Century France. Berkley, CA: University of California Press.

    Faculty Fellow

    Jonathan Barnett

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    Professor Emeritus of Practice in City and Regional Planning; Director, Urban Design Program

    About

    Jonathan Barnett is Professor Emeritus of Practice in City and Regional Planning and Director of the Urban Design Program in the School of Design. He is an architect and planner as well as an educator, and is the author of numerous books and articles on the theory and practice of city design. He has been an advisor to the cities of Charleston, SC, Cleveland, Kansas City, Miami, Nashville, New York City, Norfolk, Omaha, and Pittsburgh in the United States, as well as Xiamen and Tianjin in China. He has been the William Henry Bishop visiting professor at Yale, the Eschweiler Professor at the University of Wisconsin, the Kea Distinguished Visiting Professor at the University of Maryland, and the Sam Gibbons Eminent Scholar at the University of South Florida. Jonathan Barnett was awarded the Dale Prize for Excellence in Urban Design and Regional Planning as well as the Athena Medal from the Congress for the New Urbanism.

    Selected Publications

    Barnett, Jonathan. 2011. City Design: Modernist, Traditional, Green, and Systems Perspective.  Routledge, 2011.

    Jonathan. 1995. The Fractured Metropolis: Improving the New City, Restoring the Old City. New York: HarperCollins Publishers

    Barnett, Jonathan. 1986. The Elusive City: Five Centuries of Design, Ambition, and Miscalculation. New York: Harper and Row.

    Barnett, Jonathan. 1982. Introduction to Urban Design. New York: Harper and Row.

    Barnett, Jonathan. 1974. Urban Design as Public Policy. New York: Architectural Records Books. 

    Faculty Fellow

    Eugénie L. Birch

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    Lawrence C. Nussdorf Professor of Urban Research and Education

    Chair of the Graduate Group in City and Regional Planning

    Co-Director, Penn Institute for Urban Research

    About

    Eugénie L. Birch FAICP, RTPI (hon), is the Nussdorf Professor of Urban Research, Department of City and Regional Planning, School of Design, University of Pennsylvania. She is the founding co-director of the Penn Institute for Urban Research, and co-editor of Penn Press’s The City in the 21st Century series. Dr.Birch’s most recent publications include Slums: How Informal Real Estate Markets Work (2016), co-edited with Susan Wachter and Shohana Chattaraj, Global Urbanization  (2011), co-edited with Susan Wachter, Women’s Health and the World’s Cities  (2011), co-edited with Afaf Meleis and Susan Wachter, and Neighborhoods and Life Chances, How Place Matters (2011) co-edited with Susan Wachter and Harriet Newberger). Dr. Birch has served as editor, Journal of the American Planning Association, chair, Planning Accreditation Board, president, Association of Collegiate Schools of Planning (ACSP), Society for American City and Regional Planning History (SACRPH) and the International Planning History Society (IPHS).  Her awards include: Lawrence C. Gerkens Award in Planning History (SACRPH), Jay Chatterjee Award, Margarita McCoy Award and Distinguished Educator Award (ACSP). Dr. Birch has served as a member of the New York City Planning Commission and of the jury to select the designers for the World Trade Center site. She is currently chair, UN-HABITAT’s World Urban Campaign and president of its special initiative, the General Assembly of Partners toward Habitat III. Dr. Birch, who lives in New York City, holds a PhD and Master in Urban Planning from Columbia University and an A.B. cum laude in History and Latin American Affairs from Bryn Mawr College. 

    Selected Publications

    Birch, Eugénie L. 2013. Anchor Institutions and their Megaregional Influence. In Revitalizing America’s Cities, chapter 11, Susan M. Wachter and Kimberly Zeuli, eds. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.

    Birch, Eugénie L. and Amy Lynch. 2012. Measuring U.S. Urban Sustainability. In Moving to Sustainable Prosperity, State of the World 2012, 77-86, The Worldwatch Institute. Washington, DC: Island Press.

    Birch, Eugénie L. 2012. Cities, People and Processes as Case Studies in Urban Planning. In Oxford Handbook on Urban Planning, 259-284, Rachel Weber and Randall Crane, eds. New York: Oxford University Press.

    Birch, Eugénie L. 2012. Living Downtown in the Twenty-first Century: Past Trends and Future Policy Concerns. In Community Livability: Issues and Approaches to Sustaining the Well-being of People and Communities, 127-158, Fritz Wagner and Roger Caves, eds. New York: Routledge.

    Fellow

    Monica Brezzi

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    Head of the Regional Analysis and Statistics Unit, OECD Directorate for Public Governance and Territorial Development

    Areas of Interest

      About

      Monica Brezzi is Head of the Regional Analysis and Statistics Unit in the OECD Directorate for Public Governance and Territorial Development. Her current activities focus on the analysis of regional comparative advantages and the assessment of policies to reduce inequalities in the access to key services for citizens. She has recently contributed to design a web mapping tool to help decision makers and citizens develop a better knowledge of their society using statistical information. Before joining OECD, she worked for the Ministry of Economic Development in Italy where she contributed to design and launch a performance-based policy to measure the efficiency of local public services. 
      Penn IUR Scholar

      Robert Buckley

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      Julien Studley Fellow, Milano School of International Affairs, The New School

      About

      Bob is the Julien Studley Fellow in the Graduate Program in International Affairs at The New School.  Previously, he was Managing Director at the Rockefeller Foundation, and Advisor at the World Bank.  His work has focused on urbanization in developing countries.  A significant part involved preparing projects and grants related to urban development issues.  He has worked in more than 55 countries and has written widely on urbanization, housing, and development issues in the popular press, such as the Financial Times, the New York Times, and the Washington Post, as well as in academic journals such as the Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Nature, the Journal of Money,Credit and Banking, and Economic Development and Cultural Change.  His most recent book, Urbanization and Economic Growth, was co-edited with Michael Spence and Patricia Annez. Buckley has also taught at Syracuse University, Johns Hopkins University, and the University of Pennsylvania—and served as the chief economist of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development.  Finally, he has been a Fulbright Scholar, awarded a Regent's Fellowship at the University of California, and been supported by the Marshall Fund, the Gates Foundation, the National Science Foundation, and the International Growth Centre of Oxford University.

      Selected Publications

      Selected Publications

      Buckley, Robert and Achilles Kallergis. 2014. Does African Urban Policy Provide a Platform for Sustained Economic Growth? In The Handbook on Cities in the Global South, S. Parnell and S. Oldfield, (eds.) New York: Routledge.

      Buckley, Robert, Patricia Annez and Michael Spence. 2009. Urbanization and Economic Growth. The World Bank on behalf of the Commission on Growth and Development, Washington D.C.

      Buckley, Robert, Glumira Karaguishiyeva, Robert Van Order, and Laura Vecvagare. March 2006. Mortgage Credit Risk in EU Countries: Constraints on Exploiting the Single Currency Market, The European Journal of Law and Economics.  

      Buckely, Robert and Jerry Kalarickal. Sept. 2005. Housing Policy in Developing Countries: Conjectures and Refutations, World Bank Research Observer.

       

      Emerging Scholar

      Caroline Cheong

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      Assistant Professor, Department of History, University of Central Florida

      About

      Caroline Cheong is an assistant professor in the History Department at the University of Central Florida. Her research focuses on the relationship between urban heritage conservation and economic development, values-based conservation management, conservation economics and poverty reduction. She earned her PhD from the University of Pennsylvania in City and Regional Planning, her MS in Historic Preservation from the University of Pennsylvania and her BS in Anthropology from the University of Chicago. She was a US/ICOMOS International Exchange Intern in Al Houson, Jordan and a Graduate Intern at the Getty Conservation Institute where she evaluated the challenges and opportunities facing historic cities.  Previously, Caroline was the Director of Research for Heritage Strategies International and PlaceEconomics through which she published numerous research reports and professional publications focusing on the economic impacts of historic preservation with Donovan Rypkema.

      Selected Publications

      Macdonald, Susan and Caroline Cheong. The Role of Public-Private Partnerships in Conserving Heritage Buildings, Sites and Historic Urban Areas: A Literature Review. Los Angeles, CA: Getty Publications, 2014

      Cheong, Caroline. Instruments for urban regeneration: Mixed-capital companies. (2014). Manuscript submitted for publication. Prepared for Eduardo Rojas.

      Cheong, Caroline. Creative Cities and Place. (2013). Manuscript submitted for publication. Prepared for Donovan Rypkema, Erasmus University and the Ministry of Education, Culture and Science of the Netherlands.

      Cheong, Caroline. Cruise Ship Tourism: Issues and Trends. Prepared for the World Monuments Fund for “Harboring Tourism: A Symposium on Cruise Ships in Historic Port Communities,” 2012.

      Fellow

      Joan Clos

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      Executive Director, United Nations Human Settlement Programme (UN-Habitat)

      Areas of Interest

        About

        Joan Clos is Executive Director of the United Nations Human Settlement Programme (UN-Habitat) at the level of Undersecretary-General by the United Nations General Assembly since October 2010. Clos is a medical doctor with a distinguished career in public service and diplomacy. He was twice elected Mayor of Barcelona, serving two terms during the years 1997-2006. He was Minister of Industry, Tourism and Trade of Spain between 2006 and 2008. Prior to joining the United Nations, he served as Spanish ambassador to Turkey and Azerbaijan. He has also been a member of the Council of European Municipalities and Regions (CEMR), Chairman of the UN Advisory Committee of Local Authorities (UNACLA), President for the World Association of Cities and Local Authorities, and President of Metropolis. He has received a number of awards, which include a gold medal from the Royal Institute of British Architects in 1999 for transforming Barcelona and, in 2002 the UN-Habitat Scroll of Honour Award for encouraging global cooperation between local authorities and the United Nations. 

        Fellow

        Steve Cochrane

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        Managing Director, Moody’s Analytics

        Areas of Interest

          About

          Steven Cochrane is Managing Director of Moody’s Analytics. He oversees the U.S. regional forecasting service and directs the research and development activities of the research staff, including its Global Cities service. He also edits Regional Financial Review, a monthly publication that analyzes U.S. macro-, regional, industry, and international trends. Many of Cochrane’s consulting projects focus on state and local economic development. Early projects include a study of the industrial structure and comparative economic advantages for Sonoma County CA, followed by a ten-year update that modeled alternative outlook scenarios based on recommended improvements in labor force quality and green industry initiatives. Other projects have included studies of the changing industrial structure and economic competitiveness of Arizona, North Dakota and Pennsylvania, and the city and county of San Francisco. An analyst with Moody’s Analytics since 1993, Cochrane has been featured on Wall Street Radio, the PBS NewsHour, and CNBC.

          Selected Publications

          Cochrane, Steve and Sophia Koropeckyj, Aaron Smith, and Sean Ellis. 2013. Central Cities and Metropolitan Areas: Manufacturing and Nonmanufacturing Employment as Drivers of Growth. In Revitalizing American Cities, eds. Susan M. Wachter and Kimberly Zeuli, eds. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.

          Cochrane, Steve. 1997. Emerging Opportunities in Sonoma County: The Five Year Forecast. Sonoma County Economic Development Board.

          Cochrane, Steve. 2005. Economic Outlook: U.S. and North Dakota. North Dakota Governor’s Office.

          Emerging Scholar

          Jamaica Corker

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          Post-Doctoral Fellow, Institute for Demographic and Life Course Studies, University of Geneva

          About

          Jamaica is a post-doctoral fellow at the University of Geneva's Institute for Demographic and Life Course Studies. Her current research incorporates elements of geographic information systems (GIS) to investigate the role of urbanization and urban elites in sub-Saharan Africa's fertility transition. Jamaica received her Ph.D. in demography in 2014 from the University of Pennsylvania, where her dissertation research focused on the interrelationship of urbanization and internal migration with declines in child mortality and fertility in West Africa. She has over seven years' experience working on health and development issues in sub-Saharan Africa, including as the Family Planning Technical Advisor for the NGO Population Services International (PSI) in the Democratic Republic of the Congo and as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Guinea. Jamaica holds a M.Sc. in Population and Development from the London School of Economics and a B.A. in East Asian Studies from McGill University.

          Penn IUR Scholar

          Zaire Zenit Dinzey-Flores

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          Associate Professor, Latino and Hispanic Caribbean Studies and Sociology, Rutgers University

          About

          Zaire Z. Dinzey-Flores is Associate Professor of Sociology and Latino and Hispanic Caribbean Studies at Rutgers University. She was previously the Andrew W. Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow on Race, Crime, and Justice at the Vera Institute of Justice in New York City. Dinzey-Flores has a number of research interests including urban and community sociology, urban planning, race and ethnicity, space and place, qualitative and quantitative methods, social policy, and Latin America and Caribbean Studies. Dinzey-Flores has published articles on public housing policy and design in Puerto Rico, race and class segregation and inequality in Puerto Rico, reggaetón music and culture as an urban phenomenon, and what it means to acknowledge Latinos in the urban intellectual history of the United States. Her recent book, Locked In, Locked Out: Gated Communities in a Puerto Rican City (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2013) looks at questions of race and class inequality as they are recreated and contained in the physical built environment.

          Selected Publications

          Dinzey-Flores, Zaire Zenit. 2013. Locked In, Locked Out. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.

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