People

Penn IUR is affiliated with more than 200 experts in the field of urbanism. Its Faculty Fellows program identifies faculty at the University of Pennsylvania with a demonstrated interest in urban research; the Penn IUR Scholars program identifies urban scholars outside of Penn; and the Penn IUR Fellows program identifies expert urban practitioners. Together, these programs foster a community of scholars and encourage cross-disciplinary collaboration.

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Penn IUR Scholar

Frank S. Alexander

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Sam Nunn Professor of Law, Emory University School of Law

Areas of Interest

    About

    Frank Alexander is the Sam Nunn Professor of Law at the Emory University School of Law. His areas of expertise include property, real estate sales and finance, state and local government law, law and theology, federal housing policies, and homelessness. Alexander is the Director of the Project on Affordable Housing and Community Development, and Co-founder and Senior Advisor of the Center for Community Progress.  Alexander served as a Fellow of The Carter Center of Emory University (1993-1996), Commissioner of the State Housing Trust Fund for the Homeless (1994-1998), Interim Dean of Emory School of Law (2005-2006), and as Visiting Fellow at the Joint Center for Housing Studies, Harvard University (2007). He also has testified before Congress concerning the mortgage foreclosure crisis (2008). He is the author or editor of eight books and more than forty articles in real estate finance, community development, and law and theology.

    Selected Publications

    Alexander, Frank. 2013-2014. Georgia Real Estate Finance and Foreclosure Law (8th ed). Thomson Reuters.

    Alexander, Frank. 2011. Land Banks and Land Banking. Center for Community Progress.

    Alexander, Frank and Leslie A. Powell. 2011. Neighborhood Stabilization Strategies for Vacant and Abandoned Properties. Zoning & Planning Law Report, 34 (September).

    Alexander, Frank. 2009. Neighborhood Stabilization & Land Banking. Communities & Banking, 20(3). Boston: Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.

    Alexander, Frank. 2008. Land Banking As Metropolitan Policy. Washington, DC: Brookings Institution.

    Fellow

    Stuart Andreason

    x

    Senior Community and Economic Development Adviser, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta

    Areas of Interest

      About

      Stuart Andreason is senior community and economic development adviser, specializing in human capital and workforce development, at the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta. His major fields of study are workforce and human capital development policy and economic development policy, with a specialization in labor market and socioeconomic conditions in metropolitan areas. Prior to joining the Atlanta Fed, Andreason was a research associate at the Penn Institute for Urban Research at the University of Pennsylvania (PennIUR). There, he helped develop a set of indicators of livable and sustainable communities for the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development funded by the Ford Foundation. He was a predoctoral fellow of the Department of Education's Institute of Education Sciences at Penn and a Lincoln Institute of Land Policy C. Lowell Harriss dissertation fellow. Previously, he led two nonprofit organizations focused on economic revitalization in small towns in central Virginia and worked as a research associate for the Pew Partnership for Civic Change. He has bachelor's and master's degrees in urban and environmental planning from the University of Virginia and a PhD in city and regional planning from the University of Pennsylvania.

       

      Selected Publications

      Andreason, Stuart and Laura Wolf-Powers. 2012. “Aligning Secondary and Post-Secondary Credentialization with Economic Development Strategy or ‘If Low Educational Attainment = Poor Metropolitan Competitiveness, What Can be Done About It.” In Preparing Today’s Students for Tomorrow’s Jobs in Metropolitan America, Laura W. Perna, ed. University of Pennsylvania Press.

      Lynch, Amy, Stuart Andreason, Theodore Eisenman, John Robinson, Kenneth Steif, and Eugenie L. Birch. Sustainable Urban Development Indicators for the United States. Penn Institute for Urban Research. September 2011

      Birch, Eugenie, Amy Lynch, Stuart Andreason, Theodore Eisenman, John Robinson, and Kenneth Steif. Measuring U.S. Sustainable Urban Development. Penn Institute for Urban Research. September 2011.

      Morse, Suzanne, Stuart Andreason, Tom Cross, and Joanne Tu. Southern Virginia: Building Competitive Advantage. Civic Change Incorporated. 2010.

      Andreason, Stuart. May 2014. Dissertation: “Will Talent Attraction and Retention Improve Metropolitan Labor Markets? The Labor Market Impact of Increased Educational Attainment in U.S. Metropolitan Regions 1990-2010.”  University of Pennsylvania.  

       

      Affiliated PhD Student

      Cameron Anglum

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      Doctoral Candidate in Education Policy, University of Pennsylvania

      School/Department

      Areas of Interest

        About

        Cameron Anglum is a Doctoral Student in Education Policy and a Dean’s Scholar at the Graduate School of Education. He is interested in research centered on domestic urban educational reform in the context of myriad interdependent urban concerns including fiscal policy, spatial analysis, and public-private partnerships, subjects often siloed in public dialogue.

        Formerly of the Penn Institute for Urban Research, Anglum earned a Master’s degree in Education Policy at Penn GSE and a Bachelor’s degree in Economics from Penn’s College of Arts and Sciences. Prior to returning to Penn, he worked in investment management in the portfolio construction space for private and institutional clients.

         

        Penn IUR Scholar

        Qin Bo

        x

        Associate Professor and Deputy Head, Department of Urban Planning and Management, Renmin University of China

        Areas of Interest

          About

          Dr. QIN Bo holds a Bachelor of Engineering from the Department of Architecture in Wuhan University, a Master of Science from the Department of Urban and Regional Planning in Peking University, and a Ph.D. degree in urban studies from the National University of Singapore. He joined the Department of Urban Planning and Management at Renmin University of China in 2008 and now serves as Associate Professor and Deputy Head. His research interests include urban spatial restructuring in Chinese cities, coordinated urban-rural planning and management, and urban sustainable development in China. He is the author/co-author of four books, e.g., The Location-choice of Firms and Urban Spatial Restructuring (2012), Low Carbon Spatial Planning and Sustainable Development (2014). He has also published numerous articles in both the international renowned journals such as JAPA, Urban Studies, and Chinese top journals in urban planning. He serves as reviewer for several leading academic journals and for the National Science Foundation of China. In his academic career Dr. QIN has taught courses in architecture and regional planning and has supervised several postgraduate students studying topics ranging from low carbon urban form to peri-urban development in Chinese cities.

          Selected Publications

          Han, S.S. & Qin, B. (2014) Low-carbon Spatial Planning and Sustainable Development: The Research on Households Carbon Emission in Beijing. Beijing: Renmin University Press.

          Qin, B. (2012) Location-choice of Firms and Urban Spatial Restructuring: A Case Study in Shanghai. Beijing: China Architecture and Building Press.

          Qin, B. and An, G.P. (2009) The application of Digital Management System in the Suburban. Beijing: Renmin University Press.

          Ye Y, LeGates R, and Qin B (2013) Coordinated Urban-rural Development Planning in China: The Chengdu Model. Journal of American Planning Association, 79(2): 125-137.

          Qin B and Han S S (2013) Emerging polycentricity in Beijing: evidence from housing price variations, 2001-05. Urban Studies 50(10): 2006-2023. 

          Penn IUR Scholar

          Anthony P. Carnevale

          x

          Director and Research Professor, Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce

          Areas of Interest

            About

            Anthony P. Carnevale is Director and Research Professor at the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce, and an internationally renowned authority and scholar on education, training and employment. Earlier in his career, Carnevale founded and became President of the Institute for Workplace Learning, where he remained for ten years. Carnevale also was Director of Human Resource and Employment Studies at the Committee for Economic Development where he was appointed by President Clinton to Chair the National Commission on Employment Policy. Carnevale co-authored the principal affidavit in Rodriguez v. San Antonio, a national Supreme Court action to reform unequal tax burdens and education benefits. This historic case resulted in significant fiscal reforms in a wide variety of important states, and remains prevalent to this day.

            Selected Publications

            Carnevale, Anthony P., Nicole Smith, and Jeff Strohl. 2012. Postsecondary Education and Economic Opportunity. In Preparing Today’s Students for Tomorrow’s Jobs in Metropolitan America, 93-120. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.

            Carnevale, Anthony P. and Susan Carol Stone. 1995. The American Mosaic: An In-Depth Report on the Future of Diversity at Work. New York: McGraw-Hill.

            Carnevale, Anthony P. and Leila J. Gainer and Ann S. Meltzer. 1990 (1st ed). Workplace Basics: The Essential Skills Employers Want. Jossey-Bass Business and Management Series. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

            Carnevale, Anthony P. 1991 (1st ed). America and New Economy: How New Competitive Standards are Radically Changing American Workplaces. Jossey-Bass Business and Management Series. New York: Wiley.

            Emerging Scholar

            Ben Chrisinger

            x

            Pos-Doctoral Research Fellow, School of Medicine, Stanford University

            About

            Ben Chrisinger is a postdoctoral research fellow with Stanford University’s School of Medicine.  He is committed to research that helps explain relationships between the built environment and health, especially health disparities.  His dissertation research examined efforts to open new supermarkets in underserved areas ("food deserts") by considering development processes, store-level outcomes, and community and customer experiences. With his former advisor, Dr. Amy Hillier, Ben is helping analyze interactions between the food environment and healthy purchasing within the federal Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), and has also written about the role of SNAP in community development.

            Ben completed his Ph.D. in City and Regional Planning at the University of Pennsylvania in 2015.  He is a former fellow with the Emerging Leaders in Science and Society (ELISS) Program at the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and Graduate Research Fellow with the National Science Foundation.  He received his undergraduate and graduate degrees in Urban and Environmental Planning from the University of Virginia.  

            Selected Publications

            Chrisinger, B. (2015). Reconsidering the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program as Community Development. Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, 47(3): 273-277. DOI:10.1016/j.jneb.2014.10.005. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25467214.

            Chrisinger, B. Changing food stamp distribution to attract new grocers. The Baltimore Sun. 22 July 2015. http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/opinion/oped/bs-ed-food-desert-20150722-story.html

            Brinkley, C., Chrisinger, B., and A. Hillier (2013). Tradition of Healthy Food Access in Low-Income Neighborhoods: Price and Variety of Curbside Produce Vending Compared to Conventional Retailers. Journal of Agriculture, Food Systems, and Community Development, 4(1):155-169. http://dx.doi.org/10.5304/jafscd.2013.041.011. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4274600/.

            Chrisinger, B. “Food Stamps and Place: New Cuts Could Dry Up Food Desert Improvements.” Planetizen. December 2013. http://www.planetizen.com/node/66580

            Chrisinger, B., & S. Golden (forthcoming). Urban Agriculture & Health: What Is Known, What Is Possible. In, Morales, A., and Dawson, J. (Eds.) Cities of Farmers: Problems, Possibilities, and Processes of Producing Food in Cities. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press. (forthcoming).

            Chrisinger, B. “Planner on Wheels: Perspectives on Affordable Housing in America, by Bicycle.” American Planning Association's Planning Magazine. November 2012. https://www.planning.org/planning/2012/nov/planneronwheels.htm

            Fellow

            Joan Clos

            x

            Executive Director, United Nations Human Settlement Programme (UN-Habitat)

            Areas of Interest

              About

              Joan Clos is Executive Director of the United Nations Human Settlement Programme (UN-Habitat) at the level of Undersecretary-General by the United Nations General Assembly since October 2010. Clos is a medical doctor with a distinguished career in public service and diplomacy. He was twice elected Mayor of Barcelona, serving two terms during the years 1997-2006. He was Minister of Industry, Tourism and Trade of Spain between 2006 and 2008. Prior to joining the United Nations, he served as Spanish ambassador to Turkey and Azerbaijan. He has also been a member of the Council of European Municipalities and Regions (CEMR), Chairman of the UN Advisory Committee of Local Authorities (UNACLA), President for the World Association of Cities and Local Authorities, and President of Metropolis. He has received a number of awards, which include a gold medal from the Royal Institute of British Architects in 1999 for transforming Barcelona and, in 2002 the UN-Habitat Scroll of Honour Award for encouraging global cooperation between local authorities and the United Nations. 

              Faculty Fellow

              Dennis Culhane

              x

              Professor and Dana and Andrew Stone Chair in Social Policy

              About

              Dennis Culhane is Professor and Dana and Andrew Stone Chair in Social Policy, School of Social Policy and Practice. His primary area of research is homelessness and assisted housing policy. His research has contributed to efforts to address the housing and support needs of people experiencing housing emergencies and long-term homelessness. Culhane’s recent research includes studies of vulnerable youth and young adults, including those transitioning from foster care, juvenile justice, and residential treatment services. Culhane is the Director of Research for the National Center on Homelessness among Veterans at the United States Department of Veterans Affairs. Culhane co-directs the Intelligence for Social Policy initiative (ISP), a MacArthur-funded project to promote the development of integrated database systems by states and localities for policy analysis and systems reform.

              Selected Publications

              Byrne, Thomas, Stephen Metraux, Manuel Moreno, Dennis Culhane, Halil Toros, and Max Stevens. 2012. Los Angeles County’s Enterprise Linkages Project: An Example of the Use of Integrated Data Systems in Making Data-Driven Policy and Program Decisions. California Journal of Politics and Policy 4.

              Alvaro Cortes, Josh Leopold, Louise Rothschild, Larry Buron, Jill Khadduri, and Dennis Culhane. 2011. The 2010 Annual Homeless Assessment Report to Congress. The Selected Works of Dennis P. Culhane. Available at: http://works.bepress.com/dennis_culhane/105.

              Culhane, Dennis P. and Stephen Metraux. 2008. Rearranging the Deck Chairs or Reallocating the Lifeboats?: Homelessness Assistance and Its Alternatives. Journal of the American Planning Association 74(1): 111-121.

              Culhane, Dennis P. 2008. The Cost of Homelessness: A Perspective from the United States, European Journal of Homelessness. European Journal of Homelessness 2(1): 97-114.

              Penn IUR Scholar

              Janet Currie

              x

              Henry Putnam Professor of Economics and Public Affairs, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs

              Director of the Center for Health and Well Being, Princeton University

              Areas of Interest

                About

                Janet Currie is the Henry Putnam Professor of Economics and Public Affairs at Princeton University and the Director of Princeton’s Center for Health and Well Being. She also directs the Program on Families and Children at the National Bureau of Economic Research. She is a Member of the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies of Sciences, a Fellow of the Econometric Society, and a Fellow of the Society of Labor Economists.  She was elected Vice President of the American Economics Association in 2010, and will be President of the Society of Labor Economists in 2014. Her research focuses on the health and well-being of children. She has written about early intervention programs, programs to expand health insurance and improve health care, public housing, and food and nutrition programs. Her current research focuses on socioeconomic differences in child health, and on environmental threats to children’s health.

                Selected Publications

                Currie, Janet, and Erdal Tekin. Forthcoming. Is There a Link Between Foreclosure and Health? American Economic Journals: Economic Policy.

                Currie, Janet, and Joshua Graff-Zivin, Jamie Mullen, and Matthew Neidell. 2014. “What Do We Know About Short and Long Term Effects of Early Life Exposure to Pollution? Annual Review of Resource Economics. 

                Currie, Janet and Robert Khan, ed. 2012. The Future of Children. Children With Disabilities, 22(1). Washington DC: Princeton-Brookings.

                Currie, Janet and Reed Walker. 2011. Traffic Congestion and Infant Health. American Economic Journal-Applied Economics, 65-90.

                Currie, Janet M. 2006. The Invisible Safety Net: Protecting the Nation's Poor Children and Families. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.

                Fellow

                Andrew Davidson

                x

                President, Andrew Davidson & Co.

                Areas of Interest

                  About

                  Andrew Davidson is a financial innovator and leader in the development of financial research and analytics. He has worked extensively on mortgage-backed securities product development, valuation and hedging. He is president of Andrew Davidson & Co., Inc., a New York firm specializing in the application of analytical tools to investment management, which he founded in 1992. Andrew was instrumental in the creation of the Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae risk-sharing transactions: STACR and CAS. These transactions allow Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae to attract private capital to bear credit risk, even as they remain in government conservatorship. Andrew is also active in other dimensions of GSE reform and has testified before the Senate Banking Committee on multiple occasions. Andrew also helped establish the Structured Finance Industry Group and served on the Executive Committee at its inception. He received an MBA in Finance at the University of Chicago and a BA in Mathematics and Physics at Harvard.

                   

                  Selected Publications

                  Mortgage Valuation Models: Embedded Options, Risk, and Uncertainty with Alexander Levin, June 2014, Oxford University Press.

                  Securitization: Structuring and Investment Analysis with Anthony Sanders, Lan-Ling Wolff and Anne Ching, Sep 2003, Wiley.

                  Mortgage-Backed Securities: Investment Analysis and Advanced Valuation Techniques with Michael Herskovitz, Dec 1993, Probus.

                  Faculty Fellow

                  John DiIulio

                  x

                  Frederic Fox Leadership Professor of Politics, Religion and Civil Society

                  Faculty Director & Co-Chair of the Director's Advisory Group, Robert A. Fox Leadership Program

                  About

                  John DiIulio is the Frederic Fox Leadership Professor of Politics, Religion and Civil Society in the Department of Political Science and Directs Penn's Fox Leadership Program for undergraduates, as well as its religion research program. Over the last quarter-century, he has won several major academic and teaching awards including the 2010 Ira Abrams Memorial Award and the 2010 Lindback Award for Distinguished Teaching.  He has also chaired his academic association's standing committee on professional ethics. Outside academic life, he has developed programs to mentor the children of prisoners, provide literacy training in low-income communities, reduce homicides in high-crime police districts, and support inner-city Catholic schools that serve low-income children. He has been a research center director at the Brookings Institution, the Manhattan Institute, and Public/Private Ventures. During his academic leave in 2001-2002, he served as first Director of the White House Office of Faith-Based and Community Initiatives. He is the author, co-author, and editor of over a dozen books and several hundred articles.

                  Selected Publications

                  Wilson, James Q. and John DiIulio. 2013. American Government: Institutions and Policies (13th edition). Cengage Learning.

                  DiIulio, John. 2009. Mayberry Machiavellis After All?: Why Judging George W. Bush Is Never as Easy as It Seems. In Judging Bush, Robert Taranto et al., eds. Stanford University Press.

                  DiIulio, John. 2009. More Religion, Less Crime?: Science, Felonies, and the Three Faith Factors. Annual Review of Law and Social Science, 5.

                  DiIulio, John. 2007. Godly Republic: A Centrist Blueprint for America’s Faith-Based Future. University of California Press.

                  Affiliated PhD Student

                  Xiaoxia Dong

                  x

                  PhD Candidate, City and Regional Planning, University of Pennslyvania

                  About

                  Xiaoxia Dong is a doctoral student in the Department of City and Regional Planning at PennDesign. His research interest lies in transportation and infrastructure planning. In particular, he is eager to explore how the potential of new transportation technologies and services such as driverless cars and ride-hailing can be maximized to create accessible and sustainable urban environment. Having witnessed the success and failure of many of these emerging technologies and services in China, he also hopes to incorporate an international perspective into his research. His goal is to enable policy makers to make informed decisions when facilitating urban development with respect to new transportation technologies and services. Xiaoxia has a BA degree in Urban Planning from the University of Utah and a Master of City Planning degree from the University of Pennsylvania. He worked as a transportation planner at Fehr and Peers where he participated in multimodal planning, traffic impact studies, master planning, and statistical analyses. He also interned at the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) in Beijing after college where he learned the current sustainability related policies and practices in China.

                  Selected Publications

                  Dong, Xiaoxia. 2014 “A High Speed Future.” Panorama. University of Pennsylvania, School of Design.

                  Dong, Xiaoxia. 2011 “Wisdom of the Businessmen of Chicago” (In Chinese). Peking University Business Review. Peking University.

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