People

Penn IUR is affiliated with more than 200 experts in the field of urbanism. Its Faculty Fellows program identifies faculty at the University of Pennsylvania with a demonstrated interest in urban research; the Penn IUR Scholars program identifies urban scholars outside of Penn; and the Penn IUR Fellows program identifies expert urban practitioners. Together, these programs foster a community of scholars and encourage cross-disciplinary collaboration.

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Faculty Fellow

David S. Barnes

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Director, Health & Societies Program and Associate Professor

About

David Barnes is an Associate Professor and Director of the Health & Societies Program in the Department of History and Sociology of Science in the School of Arts and Sciences, where he teaches the history of medicine and public health. Prior to his time at Penn, Barnes taught for a year at the Institute for Liberal arts at Emory University and for seven years in the History of Science Department at Harvard University. His current research is concentrated in the history of infectious disease, epidemiology, and public health; nineteenth-century urban European social and cultural history; and the politics of international disease control programs. He has a forthcoming book on the history of the Lazaretto Quarantine Station, located outside of Philadelphia.

Selected Publications

Barnes, David. 2006. The Great Stink of Paris and the Nineteenth-Century Struggle against Filth and Germs. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press.

Barnes, David. 2002. Scents and Sensibilities: Disgust and the Meanings of Odors in Late Nineteenth-Century Paris." Historical Reflections/Réflexions historiques, 28 : 21-49.

Barnes, David. 2000. Historical Perspectives on the Etiology of Tuberculosis. Microbes and Infection, 2: 431-440.

Barnes, David. 1995. The Making of a Social Disease: Tuberculosis in Nineteenth-Century France. Berkley, CA: University of California Press.

Faculty Fellow

Jere Behrman

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William R. Kenan, Jr. Professor of Economics, University of Pennsylvania

About

Professor Behrman is also a Research Associate at Penn’s Population Studies Center and he serves as the Economics/Social Science member of the National Institutes of Health (NIH)/National Institute of Child Health and Development (NICHD) National Advisory Council. He is a leading international researcher in empirical microeconomics, with emphasis on developing economies.  His research interests include empirical microeconomics, labor economics, human resources (early childhood development, education, health, nutrition), project evaluation, economic demography, incentive systems and household behaviors. The unifying dimension of much of this research is to improve empirical knowledge of the determinants of and the impacts of human resources given unobserved factors such as innate health and ability, the functioning of various institutions such as households and imperfect markets, and information imperfections. He has published over 350 professional articles (primarily in leading general and field economic journals, also in leading demographic, sociology, nutritional and biomedical journals) and thirty-three books.  He has been a researcher with the World Bank, Asian Development Bank, Inter-American Development Bank, United Nations Development Program, other international organizations and various governments. He has been a principal investigator on over seventy research projects funded by the U.S. National Institutes of Health (twenty-three grants), U.S. National Science Foundation (thirteen grants), and a number of other governmental and foundation sources.  He has been involved in professional research or lecturing in over forty countries. He has received honors including: Fulbright 40th Anniversary Distinguished Fellow, Econometric Society Fellow, Guggenheim Foundation Fellow, Ford Foundation Fellow and 2008 biennial Carlos Diaz-Alejandro Prize for outstanding research contributions to Latin America. In December 2011 he was awarded a Doctor Honoris Causa by the University of Chile.

Faculty Fellow

Charles Branas

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Professor of Epidemiology

Cartographic Modeling Laboratory

About

Charles Branas is Professor of Epidemiology in the Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology in the Perelman School of Medicine and Director of Penn’s Cartographic Modeling Laboratory. He works to improve health and healthcare and is recognized for his efforts to reduce violence and enhance emergency care. Much of his work incorporates human geography and spatial interactions. His studies have taken him to various places including the neighborhoods of Philadelphia, rural counties across the United States and cities and small towns in Guatemala and other countries. Branas has been on various boards and scientific review panels at the National Institutes of Health, the Centers for Disease Control, the Canadian National Research Council, the South African Medical Research Council, and is a Past President of the Society for Advancement of Violence and Injury Research. Before coming to Penn, he trained and conducted research at both the Johns Hopkins and University of California, Berkeley Schools of Public Health and worked at the US Department of Health and Human Services.

Selected Publications

 

Leung, A. C., D. A. Asch, K. N. Lozada, O. Saynisch, J. M. Asch, N. Becker, H. M. Griffis, F. Shofer, J. C. Hershey, S. Hill, C. C. Branas, G. Nichol, L. B. Becker, R. M. Merchant. 2013. Where Are Lifesaving Automated External Defibrillators Located and How Hard Is It to Find Them in a Large Urban City? Resuscitation 84(7): 910-914.

Branas, C. C., C. S. Wolff, J. Williams, G. Margolis, B. G. Carr. 2013. Simulating Changes to Emergency Care Resources to Compare System Effectiveness. Journal of Clinical Epidemiology 66(8): 57-64.

Myers, S. R., C. C. Branas, B. C. French, M. L. Nance, M. J. Kallan, D. J. Wiebe, B. G. Carr. 2013. Safety in Numbers: Are Major Cities the Safest Places in the US? Annals of Emergency Medicine 13: 520-529.

Mullen, M. T., S. Judd, V. J. Howard, S. E. Kasner, C. C. Branas, K. C. Albright, J. D. Rhodes, D. O. Kleindofer, B. G. Carr. 2013. Disparities in Evaluation at Certified Primary Stroke Centers: Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke. Stroke 44(7): 1930-1935.

Branas, C. C., A. R. DiNardo, V. D. Puac Polanco, M. J. Harvey, J. L. Vassy, K. Bream. 2013. An Exploration of Violence, Mental Health and Substance Abuse in Post-conflict Guatemala. Health 5(5): 825-833.

Emerging Scholar

Catherine Brinkley

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Ph.D., Regional Planning, University of Pennsylvania

Veterinary (VMD) student, University of Pennsylvania Veterinary School

MS in Virology, Gothenburg University, Sweden

Areas of Interest

    About

    Katie Brinkley completed her Ph.D. in Regional Planning at PennDesign in December 2013 and recently finished her last clinical year in the VMD program at the University of Pennsylvania Veterinary School. Brinkley’s Ph.D. in Regional Planning and Master’s degree in Virology, along with her current work as a Veterinary student, inform her research in ecosystem management; this research concentrates particularly on the prevention of animal-to-human disease and sustainable resource planning. Her research interests include public health, the rural-urban interface, animal agriculture, and food security. Brinkley’s dissertation uses GIS and spatial analytics to explore urban development morphologies as they impact the agricultural sector, regional economies and food distribution. She has worked with the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations to assess food access and waste management in low-income nations and is a former Fulbright Fellow.

    Selected Publications

    Brinkley, C. (2012). "Evaluating the Benefits of Peri-Urban Agriculture." Journal of Planning 

    Literature. 27(3): 259-269.

    Brinkley, C. (2013). "Avenues into Food Planning: a Review of Scholarly Food System Research." International Journal of Planning Studies. 18(2): 243-266.

    Brinkley, Catherine, Eugenie Birch, and Alexander Keating. (2013) "Feeding cities: Charting a research and practice agenda toward food security." Journal of Agriculture, Food Systems and Community Development.

    Brinkley, C. forthcoming. "Decoupled: successful planning policies in countries that have reduced per capita GHG emissions with continued economic growth," Environment and Planning C: Government and Policy.

    Emerging Scholar

    Seung Ah Byun

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    Senior Planner for Water Resources, Brandywine Conservancy’s Municipal Assistance Program

    About

    Seung Ah Byun is the Senior Planner for Water Resources with the Brandywine Conservancy’s Municipal Assistance Program. Her responsibilities involve developing and managing innovative stormwater management practices, green infrastructure tools, and source water protection projects at the watershed and local scales. She also provides technical expertise to municipalities on compliance with state and federal water quality regulations such as MS4 and TMDL requirements. Previously, Seung Ah was a water resources engineer at CDM Smith, primarily consulting for the City of Philadelphia’s Office of Watersheds and CSO Program.  Seung Ah received her doctorate and a master’s degree from the University of Pennsylvania, School of Design’s Department of City and Regional Planning. She also obtained a master’s degree in environmental engineering from Drexel University and a bachelor’s of science in systems engineering from the University of Pennsylvania. Seung Ah is a licensed Professional Engineer and is a LEED Accredited Professional. 

    Selected Publications

    Byun, Seung Ah. James T. Smullen, Mark Maimone, Robert E. Dickinson, and Christopher S. Crockett. (2003) “Overcoming Obstacles for the Application of SWMM to Large-scale Watersheds.” Practical Modeling of Urban Water Systems, Monograph 11. Edited by James, William. CHI, Guelph, Ontario, Canada.

    Faculty Fellow

    Carolyn Cannuscio

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    Assistant Professor of Family Medicine and Community Health

    About

    Carolyn Cannuscio is Assistant Professor of Family Medicine and Community Health at the Perelman School of Medicine.  She is a social epidemiologist with substantial experience studying aging, chronic disease, and health disparities.  Her work focuses on the material and social causes of later-life health disparities, and the preventable causes of urban health disparities. In addition, Cannuscio advances the use of visual methods in health disparities research, collaborating with a strong interdisciplinary team of researchers and student research assistants to this end. She is a Senior Fellow with Penn’s Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics, an affiliated faculty member with Penn’s Master of Public Health Program, Senior Fellow with Penn’s Center for Public Health Initiatives, and a Health Science Specialist with the Philadelphia VA Medical Center. 

    Selected Publications

    Cannuscio, C., E. Bugos, S. Hersh, D. Asch, E. Weiss.  2012. Using Art to Amplify Youth Voices on Housing Insecurity. American Journal of Public Health, 102 (1): 10-12.

    Cannuscio, C., E. Weiss, and D, Asch.  2010. Urban Foodways: Multiple Paths to Health and Illness.”  Journal of Urban Health, 87(3): 381–393

    Cannuscio, C., E. Weiss, J. P. Schroeder, H. Fruchtman, J. Weiner, and D. Asch.  2009. Visual Epidemiology: Photographs as Tools for Probing Street-level Etiologies. Social Science and Medicine, 69(4).

    Emerging Scholar

    Jamaica Corker

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    Post-Doctoral Fellow, Institute for Demographic and Life Course Studies, University of Geneva

    About

    Jamaica is a post-doctoral fellow at the University of Geneva's Institute for Demographic and Life Course Studies. Her current research incorporates elements of geographic information systems (GIS) to investigate the role of urbanization and urban elites in sub-Saharan Africa's fertility transition. Jamaica received her Ph.D. in demography in 2014 from the University of Pennsylvania, where her dissertation research focused on the interrelationship of urbanization and internal migration with declines in child mortality and fertility in West Africa. She has over seven years' experience working on health and development issues in sub-Saharan Africa, including as the Family Planning Technical Advisor for the NGO Population Services International (PSI) in the Democratic Republic of the Congo and as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Guinea. Jamaica holds a M.Sc. in Population and Development from the London School of Economics and a B.A. in East Asian Studies from McGill University.

    Penn IUR Scholar

    Janet Currie

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    Henry Putnam Professor of Economics and Public Affairs, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs

    Director of the Center for Health and Well Being, Princeton University

    Areas of Interest

      About

      Janet Currie is the Henry Putnam Professor of Economics and Public Affairs at Princeton University and the Director of Princeton’s Center for Health and Well Being. She also directs the Program on Families and Children at the National Bureau of Economic Research. She is a Member of the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies of Sciences, a Fellow of the Econometric Society, and a Fellow of the Society of Labor Economists.  She was elected Vice President of the American Economics Association in 2010, and will be President of the Society of Labor Economists in 2014. Her research focuses on the health and well-being of children. She has written about early intervention programs, programs to expand health insurance and improve health care, public housing, and food and nutrition programs. Her current research focuses on socioeconomic differences in child health, and on environmental threats to children’s health.

      Selected Publications

      Currie, Janet, and Erdal Tekin. Forthcoming. Is There a Link Between Foreclosure and Health? American Economic Journals: Economic Policy.

      Currie, Janet, and Joshua Graff-Zivin, Jamie Mullen, and Matthew Neidell. 2014. “What Do We Know About Short and Long Term Effects of Early Life Exposure to Pollution? Annual Review of Resource Economics. 

      Currie, Janet and Robert Khan, ed. 2012. The Future of Children. Children With Disabilities, 22(1). Washington DC: Princeton-Brookings.

      Currie, Janet and Reed Walker. 2011. Traffic Congestion and Infant Health. American Economic Journal-Applied Economics, 65-90.

      Currie, Janet M. 2006. The Invisible Safety Net: Protecting the Nation's Poor Children and Families. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.

      Emerging Scholar

      Theodore Eisenman

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      Assistant Professor of Landscape Architecture, University of Massachusetts Amherst

      About

      Theodore Eisenman, Ph.D., is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Landscape Architecture and Regional Planning at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. He was previously an Andrew W. Mellon Fellow in the Humanities Institute at the New York Botanical Garden, and his principle scholarly interest concerns the historical, scientific, cultural, and design bases of urban greening – defined here as the introduction or conservation of outdoor vegetation in cities. Theodore’s career spans research and practice with a range of federal, municipal, and nonprofit organizations. He has been a regular contributor to Landscape Architecture Magazine on ecological design topics and is currently a review editor for the urban ecology section of Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution. Raised in Sweden and the United States, and having worked as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Senegal, he is also interested in international affairs.

      Selected Publications

      Eisenman, T. S. (2016). Greening Cities in an Urbanizing Age: The Human Health Bases in the 19th and Early 21st Centuries. Change Over Time, In Press.

      Eisenman, T. S. (2016) [Review of The Ecological Design and Planning Reader, by F. O. Ndubisi]. Journal of Planning Education and Research, OnlineFirst.

      Eisenman, T. S. (2013). Frederick Law Olmsted, Green Infrastructure, and the Evolving City. Journal of Planning History, 12(4), 287–311.

      Eisenman, T. S. (2013). [Review of Greening Berlin: The Co-production of Science, Politics, and Urban Nature, by J. Lachmund]. Journal of Planning Literature, 28(3), 258–259.

      Eisenman, T. S. Anzevino, J., Rosenberg, S., & Spector, S. (Eds.). (2010). Revitalizing Hudson Riverfronts: Illustrated Conservation & Development Strategies for Creating Healthy, Prosperous Communities. Poughkeepsie, NY: Scenic Hudson.

       

      Faculty Fellow

      Kenneth Foster

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      Professor of Bioengineering

      About

      Kenneth Foster is Professor of Bioengineering in the School of Engineering and Applied Science. His research interests relate to biomedical applications of nonionizing radiation from audio through microwave frequency ranges, and health and safety aspects of electromagnetic fields as they interact with the body. Foster examines the prospects of workers in electrical occupations and the possibility (or lack of) cancer risk. Another and somewhat broader topic of interest is technological risk, and impact of technology (principally, electrotechnologies) on humans. His goal in this area is to examine technology, putting into perspective its relative risks and benefits to society. What he hopes to impart is a better perception of the social use of science.

      Selected Publications

      K. R. Foster and R. A. Tell, Radiofrequency exposures from Trilliant SmartMeter, Health Physics 105:177-186 (2013).

      K. R. Foster, A world awash with wireless devices. IEEE Microwave Magazine 14: 73-84 (2013).

      K. R. Foster and J. E. Moulder, Wi-Fi and Health: Review of Current Status of Research Health Physics 105:561-575 (2013).

      Affiliated PhD Student

      Ari Friedman

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      MD/PhD Candidate in Health Economics, University of Pennsylvania

      About

      Ari B. Friedman is a Fellow at the Leonard Davis Institute and a sixth-year M.D./Ph.D. student in health economics at the University of Pennsylvania's Perelman School of Medicine and the Wharton School. His research interests include the industrial organization of the unscheduled care system (primary care clinics, urgent care and retail clinics, and emergency departments), access to care and insurance, and financially integrating population health into the medical system. His work has been cited more than 600 times, with an h-index of 8.

      Selected Publications

      Friedman AB. Comment on Economic Incentives and Use of the Intensive Care Unit. JAMA 2014. 311(22):2336-2337.

      Rhodes KV, Kenney GM, Friedman AB, Saloner B, Lawson CC, Chearo D, Wissoker D, Polsky D. Primary Care Access for New Patients on the Eve of Health Care Reform. JAMA Int Med 2014.

      Becker NV, Friedman AB. Emergency Department, Heal Thyself. Am J Emerg Med 2014. 32(2):175-177.

      Friedman AB, Mendola T. To Cover Their Child, One Couple Navigates A Health Insurance Maze In Pennsylvania. Health Affairs2013. 32(5):994-997.

      Friedman AB, Becker N. Understanding the Individual Mandate's SCOTUS Pivot Points. LDI Health Economist. April 2012.VIDEO

      Faculty Fellow

      Karen Glanz

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      George A. Weiss University Professor, Professor of Epidemiology and Nursing, School of Nursing, Perelman School of Medicine

      About

      Karen Glanz, PhD, MPH is George A. Weiss University Professor in the Perelman School of Medicine and the School of Nursing, and Director of the CDC-funded University of Pennsylvania Prevention Research Center. She was previously at Emory University (2004-2009), the University of Hawaii (1993 to 2004), and Temple University. A globally influential public health scholar whose work spans psychology, epidemiology, nutrition and other disciplines, her research in community and health care settings focuses on obesity, nutrition, and the built environment; chronic disease management and control; reducing health disparities; and health communication technologies.  Her research and publications about understanding, measuring and improving healthy food environments, beginning in the 1980’s, and have been widely recognized and replicated. In particular, she has led the development of the widely-used NEMS (Nutrition Environment Measures Survey) audit tools for assessing food environments in stores, restaurants, and other retail food settings. She is a member of the US Task Force on Community Preventive Services.  Dr. Glanz is senior editor of Health Behavior and Health Education: Theory, Research, and Practice (Jossey-Bass Inc.), a widely used text now in its fourth edition.  Dr. Glanz was elected to membership in the Institute of Medicine (IOM) of the National Academy of Sciences in 2013.  She was designated a Highly Cited Author by ISIHighlyCited.com, in the top 0.5% of authors in her field over a 20-year period.

      Selected Publications

      Foster G, Karpyn A, Wojtanowski A, Davis E, Weiss S, Brensinger C, Tierney A, Guo W, Brown J, Spross C, Leuchten D, Burns P, Glanz K.  Placement strategies to increase the sales of healthier products in supermarkets in low-income, ethnically-diverse neighborhoods: A randomized controlled trial.  American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 99: 1359-1368, 2014.

      Cavanaugh E, Green S, Mallya G, Tierney A, Brensinger C, Glanz K.  Changes in Food and Beverage Environments after an Urban Corner Store Intervention.  Preventive Medicine, 65:7-12, 2014.

      Lucan SC, Hillier A, Schechter CB, Glanz K.  Objective and self-reported factors associated with food environment perceptions and fruit-and-vegetable consumption:  A multilevel analysis.  Preventing Chronic Disease, 2014; 11: 130324.

      Kegler MC, Swan DW, Alcantara I, Feldman L, Glanz K.  The influence of rural home and neighborhood environments on healthy eating, physical activity, and weight.  Prevention Science, 2014; 15:1-11.

      Cannuscio CC, Tappe K, Hillier A, Buttenheim A, Karpyn A, Glanz K.  An assessment of the urban food environment and residents’ shopping behaviors in that environment.  American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 45: 606-614, 2013.

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