People

Penn IUR is affiliated with more than 200 experts in the field of urbanism. Its Faculty Fellows program identifies faculty at the University of Pennsylvania with a demonstrated interest in urban research; the Penn IUR Scholars program identifies urban scholars outside of Penn; and the Penn IUR Fellows program identifies expert urban practitioners. Together, these programs foster a community of scholars and encourage cross-disciplinary collaboration.

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Affiliated PhD Student

Jane Abell

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Doctoral Candidate in Anthropology, University of Pennsylvania

About

Jane Lief Abell is a second year doctoral student in Anthropology at the University of Pennsylvania. Her research explores Islam in the United States, with a particular focus on how race and religion inform relations among "native" and immigrant Muslim groups. Currently, she is working with Al-Bustan Seeds of Culture, an Arabic language and arts organization based in West Philly, and conducting fieldwork in Northeast Philadelphia. Prior to entering graduate school, Jane held several research and editorial positions at the Center for Middle East Studies at Harvard University; Harvard Divinity School; the Berkman Center for Internet & Society; the Consortium on Gender, Security, and Human Rights; and Law People Management, LLC. Jane holds a BA with High Honors in Sociology & Anthropology and Islamic Studies from Swarthmore College. 

 

Faculty Fellow

Camille Z. Charles

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Professor of Sociology; Edmund J. and Louise W. Kahn Term Professor in the Social Sciences

Chair, Department of Africana Studies

About

Camille Charles is Professor of Sociology, Edmund J. and Louise W. Kahn Term Professor in the Social Sciences, and Chair of the Department of Africana Studies in the Department of Sociology in the School of Arts and Sciences. Her research interests are in the areas of urban inequality, racial attitudes and intergroup relations, racial residential segregation, minorities in higher education, and racial identity.  Her work has appeared in Social Forces, Social Problems, Social Science Research, The DuBois Review, the American Journal of Education, the Annual Review of Sociology, the Chronicle of Higher Education, and The Root.

Selected Publications

Charles, Camille Z., Douglas S. Massey, Mary J. Fischer, and Margarita Mooney, with Brooke A. Cunningham, and Gniesha Y. Dinwiddie. 2009. Taming the River: Negotiating the Academic, Financial and Social Currents in Selective Colleges and Universities. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.

Bobo, Lawrence D. and Camille Z. Charles. 2008. Race in the American Mind: From the Moynihan Report to the Obama Candidacy. The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Sciences 621: 243-259. Charles, Camille Zubrinsky. 2007. Comfort Zones: Immigration, Acculturation, and the Neighborhood Racial Composition Preferences of Latinos and Asians. Du Bois Review: Social Science Research on Race 4(1): 41-77.

Charles, Camille Z., Kimberly C. Torres, and Rachelle J. Brunn. 2007. Black Like Who? Exploring the Racial, Ethnic, and Class Diversity of Black Students at Selective Colleges and Universities. In Racism in Post-Race America: New 4 Theories, New Directions, Charles A. Gallagher, ed. Chapel Hill, NC: Social Forces, 247-266.

Charles, Camille Zubrinsky. 2006. Won’t You Be My Neighbor? Race, Class and Residence in Los Angeles. New York: Russell Sage. 

Penn IUR Scholar

Edward Glaeser

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Fred and Eleanor Glimp Professor of Economics, Harvard University

Areas of Interest

    About

    Ed Glaeser is the Fred and Eleanor Glimp Professor of Economics at Harvard, where he also serves as Director of the Taubman Center for State and Local Government and the Rappaport Institute for Greater Boston. He studies the economics of cities, and has written widely on urban issues, including the growth of cities, segregation, crime, and housing markets. He has been particularly interested in the role that geographic proximity can play in creating knowledge and innovation. 

    Selected Publications

    Glaeser, Edward L. "Wealth and the Self-Protection Society." In 100 Years: Leading Economists Predict the Future. Ed. Ignacio Palacios-Huerta. MIT Press, 2014.

    Glaeser, Edward L. "Urban Public Finance." Handbook in Public Economics.Ed. Alan J. Auerbach, Raj Chetty, Martin Feldstein, and Emmanuel Saez. Elsevier B.V., 2013.

    Glaeser, Edward L., Christopher F. Chabris, James J. Lee, Daniel J. Benjamin, Jonathan P. Beauchamp, Gregoire Borst, Steven Pinker, and David I. Laibson. "Why It Is Hard to Find Genes Associated with Social Science Traits: Theoretical and Empirical Considerations." American Journal of Public Health 103.S1 (October 2013): S152-S166.

    Glaeser, Edward L., Steve Poftak, and Kristina Tobio. "What Do Parents Want? An Exploration of School Preferences Expressed by Boston Parents." HKS Faculty Research Working Paper Series RWP13-024, July 2013.

    Glaeser, Edward L. "A World of Cities: The Causes and Consequences of Urbanization in Poorer Countries." National Bureau of Economic Research, December 2013.

    Faculty Fellow

    David Grazian

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    Associate Professor of Sociology

    About

    David Grazian is Associate Professor of Sociology in the Department of Sociology in the School of Arts and Sciences. His research areas include sociology of culture, popular culture and mass media, urban sociology, symbolic interaction, race and ethnicity, ethnographic methods and social theory. Grazian teaches courses on popular culture, mass media and the arts, cities and urban sociology, social interaction and public behavior, and ethnographic methods. In his research he employs a variety of ethnographic and other qualitative methods to study the production and consumption of commercial entertainment in the urban milieu.. He recently received a fellowship from the Institute for Advanced Studies (IAS) in Princeton, New Jersey to pursue his research full time during the 2013-2014 academic year. During his sabbatical year of residence, Grazian will complete a book manuscript on metropolitan zoos as repositories of culture as well as nature. The book is tentatively titled Where the Wild Things Aren’t: City Zoos and the Culture of Nature.

    Selected Publications

    Grazian, David. 2010. Mix It Up: Popular Culture, Mass Media, and Society. W.W. Norton.

    Grazian, David. 2008. On the Make: The Hustle of Urban Nightlife. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

    Grazian, David. 2003. Blue Chicago: The Search for Authenticity in Urban Blues Clubs. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

    Grazian, David. A Digital Revolution? 2005. A Reassessment of New Media and Cultural Production in the Digital Age. Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science 597: 209-222. 

    Grazian, David. 2004. Opportunities for Ethnography in the Sociology of Music. Poetics: Journal of Empirical Research on Culture, the Media and the Arts 32(3-4): 197-210.

    Faculty Fellow

    Kathleen D. Hall

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    Associate Professor of Education and Anthropology, Education, Culture, and Society Division

    Associate Professor of Education Associated Faculty (secondary appointment)

    About

    Kathleen D. Hall is Associate Professor of Education and Anthropology in the Education, Culture, and Society Division of the Graduate School of Education with a secondary appointment in the Department of Anthropology. She is a member of the graduate groups in Sociology, Folklore, Social Policy and Practice, and South Asia Studies and is affiliated with the Urban Studies and Asian American Studies programs. She received the Michael Katz Excellence in Teaching Award in the Urban Studies Program in 2001 and the Provost’s Award for Distinguished Ph.D Teaching and Mentoring in 2009. Her research and publications focus on: immigration, citizenship, racial and class inequality, and national incorporation in the United Kingdom and the United States; the politics of knowledge in public sector policy and governance; risk management, human rights, and anti-terrorism law in the United Kingdom; and concepts of "global citizenship" and related efforts to "internationalize" K-16 education in the US and the UK Before joining the GSE faculty in 1995, Hall was a postdoctoral Fellow at Chapin Hall Center for Children at the University of Chicago, where she conducted research on community-based poverty initiatives. 

    Selected Publications

    Hall, K. D. 2010. Security and the Risk Management State: British Anti-Terrorism Policies After 7/7. In New Ethnographies at the Limits of Neoliberalism, C. Greenhouse, ed. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press. 

    Hall, K. D. 2009. British Sikh Lives Lived in Translation. Everyday Life in South Asia, 2nd Edition. Bloomington: University of Indiana Press.

    Hall, K. D. 2005. Science, Globalization and Educational Governance: The Political Rationalities of the New Managerialism. The Indiana Journal of Global Legal Studies. Special edition on Globalization and Education 12(1): 153-182.

    Hall, K. D. 2004. The Ethnography of Imagined Communities: The Cultural Production of Sikh Ethnicity in Britain. In Being Here and Being There: Fieldwork Encounters and Ethnographic Discoveries,  E. Anderson, S. Brooks, R. Gunn, and N. Jones, eds. The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science [Special Issue]: 595.

    Faculty Fellow

    Ira Harkavy

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    Associate Vice President and Founding Director of the Barbara and Edward Netter Center for Community Partnerships

    Areas of Interest

      About

      Ira Harkavy is Associate Vice President and Founding Director of the Barbara and Edward Netter Center for Community Partnerships. An historian with extensive experience building university-community-school partnerships, Harkavy teaches in the departments of history, urban studies, and Africana studies, and in the Graduate School of Education.  As Director of the Netter Center since 1992, Harkavy has helped to develop academically based community service courses, as well as participatory action research projects, that involve creating university-community partnerships and university-assisted community schools in Penn's local community of West Philadelphia. The executive editor of Universities and Community Schools, Harkavy has written and lectured widely on the history and current practice of urban university-community-school partnerships and strategies for integrating the university missions of teaching, research, and service. Since 2007, he has co-authored or co-edited the several books on university civic engagement.

      Selected Publications

      Berganm, Sjur, Ira Harkavy, Hilligje van’t Land. 2013. Reimagining Democratic Societies. Strasbourg: Council of Europe Publishing.

      Hartley, Matthew Hartley, Vivian Gadsden, Ira Harkavy, and Rita Hodges. 2013. “Leadership and Diversity: Leading Institutional Change to Promote a Diverse Democracy.” In Leadership and Governance in Higher Education. Berlin: RAABE Academic Publishers.

      Johnston, Francis E. and Ira Harkavy. 2009. The Obesity Culture: Strategies for Change. Public Health and University-Community Partnerships. Smith-Gordon.

      Benson, Lee, John Puckett, and Ira Harkavy. 2007. Dewey’s Dream: Universities and Democracies in an Age of Education Reform. Temple Press.

      Huber, Josef and Ira Harkavy. 2007. Higher Education and Democratic Culture: Citizenship, Human Rights and Civic Responsibility. Council of Europe Publishing. 

      Penn IUR Scholar

      Shaun R. Harper

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      Executive Director, Southern California Center on Race & Equity

      School/Department

      Areas of Interest

        About

        Shaun R. Harper was Associate Professor and Director of the Center for the Study of Race and Equity in Education in the Higher Education Division of the Graduate School of Education. He now acts as Founding Executive Director for the Southern California Center on Race & Equity. His research examines race and gender in higher education, Black male college access and achievement, and college student engagement. He has published eleven books and more than eighty peer-reviewed journal articles and other academic publications. His research has been praised by the Association for the Study of Higher Education (2008 Early Career Award); the National Association of Student Personnel Administrators (2010 Outstanding Contribution to Research Award, 2012 Robert H. Shaffer Award for Faculty Excellence, and 2013 Pillar of the Profession); and the American Educational Research Association (2010 Division G Early Career Award). He is principal investigator of the New York City Black and Latino Male High School Achievement Study.

        Selected Publications

        Harper, Shaun R and J. Luke Wood. 2014. Advancing Black Male Student Success from Preschool through Ph.D. Stylus Publishing.

        Harper, Shaun R. 2013. Am I My Brother’s Teacher? Black Undergraduates, Peer Pedagogies, and Racial Socialization in Predominantly White Postsecondary Contexts. Review of Research in Education, 37: 183-211.

        Schuh, John H., Susan R. Jones, and Shaun R. Harper. 2011. Student Services: A Handbook for the Profession (5th edition). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

        Harper, Shaun R. 2012. Race without Racism: How Higher Education Researchers Minimize Racist Institutional Norms. The Review of Higher Education, 36(1): 9-29.

        Harper, S. R., and C. H. F. Davis III. 2012. They (Don’t) Care about Education: A Counternarrative on Black Male Students’ Responses to Inequitable Schooling. Educational Foundations, 26(1), 103-120.

        Harper, S. R., and K.A. Griffin. 2011. Opportunity beyond Affirmative Action: How Low-income and Working-class Black Male Achievers Access Highly Selective, High-cost Colleges and Universities. Harvard Journal of African American Public Policy, 17(1): 43-60.

        Fellow

        Daniel Hartley

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        Research Economist, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland

        About

        Daniel Hartley is a Research Economist in the Research Department of the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland. He is primarily interested in urban/regional economics and labor economics. His current work focuses on gentrification, public housing, neighborhood housing market dynamics, and household finance. Raised in the Hyde Park neighborhood on the South Side of Chicago, Hartley has always had a deep appreciation of cities. His prior employment includes a three-year spell as a software developer, and summer jobs in various research areas including electrical engineering and asset management.

        Selected Publications

        Guerrieri, V., D. Hartley, and E. Hurst. 2013. Endogenous Gentrification and Housing Price Dynamics. Journal of Public Economics, 100: 45-60.

        Guerrieri, V., D. Hartley, and E. Hurst. 2012. Within-city Variation in Urban Decline: The Case of Detroit. American Economic Review - Papers and Proceedings, 102(3): 120-126.

        Hartley, D. and K. Fee. 2013. “The Relationship between City Center Density and Urban Growth or Decline.” In Revitalizing American Cities, Susan Wachter and Kimberly Zeuli, eds. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.

        Aliprantis, D. and D. Hartley. Blowing It Up and Knocking It Down: The Local and City-Wide Effects of Demolishing High Concentration Public Housing on Crime. (Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland Working Paper). http://www.clevelandfed.org/research/workpaper/2010/wp1022r.pdf.

        Faculty Fellow

        John L. Jackson, Jr.

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        Richard Perry University Professor of Communication, Africana Studies, and Anthropology

        Associate Dean for Administration

        About

        John L Jackson, Jr .is Richard Perry University Professor of Communication, Africana Studies, and Anthropology, in the Annenberg School for Communication and the School of Arts and Sciences, and Associate Dean for Administration in the Annenberg School for Communication. His research interests include ethnographic methods in media analysis, the impact of mass media on urban life, mediamaking as a form of community-building and proselytizing among religious organizations, globalization and the remaking of ethnic/racial diasporas, visual studies and theories of reality, and racialization and media technology. Before coming to Penn, he taught in the Department of Cultural Anthropology at Duke University and spent three years as a Junior Fellow at the Harvard University Society of Fellows in Cambridge, Massachusetts. As a filmmaker, Jackson has produced a feature-length fiction film, documentaries, and film-shorts that have screened at film festivals internationally. 

        Selected Publications

        Daniels, Cora and John Jackson. 2014, Forthcoming. Impolite Conversations: On Race, Class, Sex, Religion, and Politics. New York: Atria Books [Simon and Schuster imprint].

        Jackson, John. 2013. Thin Description: Ethnography and the African Hebrew Israelites of Jerusalem. Cambridge, Mass: Harvard University Press.

        Jackson, John. 2008. Racial Paranoia: The Unintended Consequences of Political Correctness. New York: Basic Civitas.

        Jackson, John. 2005. Real Black: Adventures in Racial Sincerity. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

        Jackson, John. 2001. Harlemworld: Doing Race and Class in Contemporary Black America. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

        Penn IUR Scholar

        Mark L. Joseph

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        Associate Professor, Jack, Joseph and Morton Mandel School of Applied Social Sciences

        Director, National Initiative on Mixed-Income Communities

        Faculty Associate, Center on Urban Poverty and Community Development, Case Western Reserve University

        About

        Mark L. Joseph is an Associate Professor at the Mandel School of Applied Social Sciences, Director of the National Initiative on Mixed-Income Communities, and a Faculty Associate at the Center on Urban Poverty and Community Development at Case Western Reserve University. Joseph teaches classes on community practice. His fields of interest are urban poverty, community development, mixed-income development, and comprehensive community initiatives. In 2013 he launched the National Initiative on Mixed-Income Communities (NIMC) to serve as a central resource for research and information on creating and sustained mixed-income developments.  His research and evaluation work includes mixed-income public housing transformations in Chicago, San Francisco, and Akron, Ohio.  He is on the Urban Institute team conducting the national evaluation of the federal government's Choice Neighborhoods Initiative.  The NIMC will provide a database on mixed-income developments across the country as well as a mixed-income library and periodic scans of the field (nimc.case.edu).

        Selected Publications

        Joseph, M. L. 2013. Mixed-income Symposium Summary and Response: Implications for Antipoverty Policy. Cityscape, 15(2): 215-221.

        McCormick, N., M L. Joseph, and R. J. Chaskin. 2012. The New Stigma of Relocated Public Housing Residents: Challenges to Social Identity in Mixed-income Developments. City and Community, 11(3): 285-308.

        Chaskin, R. J. and M. L. Joseph. 2012. “Positive” Gentrification, Social Inclusion, and the “Right to the City” in Mixed-income Communities: Uses and Expectations of Space and Place. International Journal of Urban and Regional Research, 37(2): 280-302.

        Joseph, M. L. 2011. Reinventing Older Communities Through Mixed-income Development: What are We Learning from Chicago’s Public Housing Transformation? In Neighborhood and Life Chances: How Place Matters in Modern America, 122-139. Harriet B. Newburger, Eugénie L. Birch, and Susan M. Wachter, eds. 122-139. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press. 

        Affiliated PhD Student

        Elaine Leigh

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        Doctoral Candidate, Graduate School of Education, University of Pennsylvania

        School/Department

        Areas of Interest

          About

          Elaine Leigh is a first-year Ph.D. Student in Higher Education at Penn GSE. Her research interests include college access and success, diversity in higher education, and K-16 state and federal policies impacting educational preparation pipelines. Previously, Elaine was Director of Support Services at Steppingstone Scholars, a Philadelphia nonprofit that prepares educationally underserved students for college and career success. In this role, Elaine developed and led several key initiatives including an annual citywide college conference, two summer academic learning programs, and school-year programming involving tutoring, mentoring, career development, college readiness, and individual college counseling. As a Teach For America alumna, Elaine began her career in education teaching middle school science in the School District of Philadelphia and also served as a college counselor for ASPIRA’s TRIO Talent Search program. Additionally, Elaine stays engaged in the Philadelphia community as a board member for SEAMAAC, an immigrant and refugee social service agency, and has previously served on the boards of PhilaSoup and The Spruce Foundation. A native of Seattle, WA, Elaine holds a B.A. in Psychology from the University of Washington and M.S.Ed. in Urban Education from the University of Pennsylvania.

          Faculty Fellow

          John M. MacDonald

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          Penny and Robert A. Fox Faculty Director of Penn’s Fels Institute of Government, Professor of Criminology and Sociology

          About

          John M. MacDonald is Penny and Robert A. Fox Faculty Director of Penn’s Fels Institute of Government and Chair of the Department of Criminology. He focuses primarily on the study of interpersonal violence, race, and ethnic disparities in criminal justice, and the effect of public policy responses on crime.  His contributions to public policy research include numerous studies using rigorous, quasi-experimental and experimental designs showing the effects of social policies on crime, of institutional social justice reforms on crime, and more recently, the health effects of various policy interventions. He was awarded the Young Experimental Scholar Award by the Academy of Experimental Criminology for significant contributions to experimental research.  He also received the David N. Kershaw Award for distinguished contribution to the field of public policy analysis and management from the American Association of Public Policy Analysis and Management. His latest urban research examines the effects of land use zoning on crime and was supported by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Program on Public Health Law Research.

          Selected Publications

          Berk, R. and John M. MacDonald. 2010. Policing the Homeless: An Evaluation of Efforts to Reduce Homeless-Related Crime. Criminology and Public Policy, 9” 813-840.

          Cook, P. and John M. MacDonald. 2011. Public Safety through Private Action: An Economic Assessment of BIDs. Economic Journal, 121: 445-462.

          Branas, C.  R. Cheney, J. M. MacDonald, V. W. Tam, T. D. Jackson, T. R. Ten Have. 2011. A Difference-in-Differences Analysis of Health, Safety, and Greening of Vacant Urban Space. American Journal of Epidemiology, 174: 1296-1306.

          Anderson, J., J. M. MacDonald, R. Bluthenthal, and S. Ashwood.  2013. Reducing Crime by Shaping the Built Environment with Zoning: An Empirical Study of Los Angeles.  University of Pennsylvania Law Review, 161: 699-756.

          MacDonald, J. M., J. Hipp and C. Gill. 2013. The Effect of Immigrant Concentration on Changes in Neighborhood Crime Rates. Journal of Quantitative Criminology, 29: 191-215.

          Nicosia, N., J. M. MacDonald, and J. Arkes. 2013. Disparities in Criminal Court Referrals to Drug Treatment and Prison for Minority Men. American Journal of Public Health, 103: e77-e84.

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