People

Penn IUR is affiliated with more than 200 experts in the field of urbanism. Its Faculty Fellows program identifies faculty at the University of Pennsylvania with a demonstrated interest in urban research; the Penn IUR Scholars program identifies urban scholars outside of Penn; and the Penn IUR Fellows program identifies expert urban practitioners. Together, these programs foster a community of scholars and encourage cross-disciplinary collaboration.

View by:
, ,
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
clear
Penn IUR Scholar

Frank S. Alexander

x

Sam Nunn Professor of Law, Emory University School of Law

Areas of Interest

    About

    Frank Alexander is the Sam Nunn Professor of Law at the Emory University School of Law. His areas of expertise include property, real estate sales and finance, state and local government law, law and theology, federal housing policies, and homelessness. Alexander is the Director of the Project on Affordable Housing and Community Development, and Co-founder and Senior Advisor of the Center for Community Progress.  Alexander served as a Fellow of The Carter Center of Emory University (1993-1996), Commissioner of the State Housing Trust Fund for the Homeless (1994-1998), Interim Dean of Emory School of Law (2005-2006), and as Visiting Fellow at the Joint Center for Housing Studies, Harvard University (2007). He also has testified before Congress concerning the mortgage foreclosure crisis (2008). He is the author or editor of eight books and more than forty articles in real estate finance, community development, and law and theology.

    Selected Publications

    Alexander, Frank. 2013-2014. Georgia Real Estate Finance and Foreclosure Law (8th ed). Thomson Reuters.

    Alexander, Frank. 2011. Land Banks and Land Banking. Center for Community Progress.

    Alexander, Frank and Leslie A. Powell. 2011. Neighborhood Stabilization Strategies for Vacant and Abandoned Properties. Zoning & Planning Law Report, 34 (September).

    Alexander, Frank. 2009. Neighborhood Stabilization & Land Banking. Communities & Banking, 20(3). Boston: Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.

    Alexander, Frank. 2008. Land Banking As Metropolitan Policy. Washington, DC: Brookings Institution.

    Faculty Fellow

    David Bell

    x

    Xinmei Zhang and Yongge Dai Professor, Professor of Marketing

    About

    David Bell is Xinmei Zhang and Yongge Dai Professor and Professor of Marketing in the Marketing Department at The Wharton School. His current research focuses on theories and explanations for geographic variation in the performance of Internet retail startups; his recent articles explain the effect of physical location on customer acquisition, contagion effects among co-located consumers, and the effect of preference isolation on online demand. His other projects focus on traditional retail settings and explore unplanned and impulse buying and consumer amortization strategies for fixed shopping costs. His previous articles explained consumer store choice among retailers with different pricing strategies, the effect of reference point formation on consumer response to promotions, and the effect of structural factors (e.g., dwelling size) on consumer shopping strategies. Bell’s research is published in premier academic marketing journals and he is on the editorial boards of International Journal of Research in Marketing, Journal of Marketing, Journal of Marketing Research, Journal of Retailing, and Marketing Science.

    Selected Publications

    Jae Young Lee, David Bell. (Work In Progress). Social Learning and Awareness Diffusion for Online Retail Trials.

    Jae Young Lee, David Bell. 2013. Neighborhood Social Capital and Social Learning for Experience Attributes of Products. Marketing Science.

    David Bell, JeongHye Choi, Leonard Lodish. 2012. What Matters Most in Internet Retailing. MIT Sloan Management Review 54: 27-33.

    Jeonghye Choi, David Bell, Leonard Lodish. 2012. Traditional and IS-Enabled Customer Acquisition on the Internet. Management Science 58: 754-769. Preyas Desai, David Bell, Gary Lilien, David Soberman. 2012. Editorial: The Science-to-Practice Initiative: Getting New Marketing Science Thinking into the Real World. Marketing Science 31(1): 1-3.

    Penn IUR Scholar

    Qin Bo

    x

    Associate Professor and Deputy Head, Department of Urban Planning and Management, Renmin University of China

    Areas of Interest

      About

      Dr. QIN Bo holds a Bachelor of Engineering from the Department of Architecture in Wuhan University, a Master of Science from the Department of Urban and Regional Planning in Peking University, and a Ph.D. degree in urban studies from the National University of Singapore. He joined the Department of Urban Planning and Management at Renmin University of China in 2008 and now serves as Associate Professor and Deputy Head. His research interests include urban spatial restructuring in Chinese cities, coordinated urban-rural planning and management, and urban sustainable development in China. He is the author/co-author of four books, e.g., The Location-choice of Firms and Urban Spatial Restructuring (2012), Low Carbon Spatial Planning and Sustainable Development (2014). He has also published numerous articles in both the international renowned journals such as JAPA, Urban Studies, and Chinese top journals in urban planning. He serves as reviewer for several leading academic journals and for the National Science Foundation of China. In his academic career Dr. QIN has taught courses in architecture and regional planning and has supervised several postgraduate students studying topics ranging from low carbon urban form to peri-urban development in Chinese cities.

      Selected Publications

      Han, S.S. & Qin, B. (2014) Low-carbon Spatial Planning and Sustainable Development: The Research on Households Carbon Emission in Beijing. Beijing: Renmin University Press.

      Qin, B. (2012) Location-choice of Firms and Urban Spatial Restructuring: A Case Study in Shanghai. Beijing: China Architecture and Building Press.

      Qin, B. and An, G.P. (2009) The application of Digital Management System in the Suburban. Beijing: Renmin University Press.

      Ye Y, LeGates R, and Qin B (2013) Coordinated Urban-rural Development Planning in China: The Chengdu Model. Journal of American Planning Association, 79(2): 125-137.

      Qin B and Han S S (2013) Emerging polycentricity in Beijing: evidence from housing price variations, 2001-05. Urban Studies 50(10): 2006-2023. 

      Fellow

      Paul C. Brophy

      x

      Principal, Brophy & Reilly, LLC

      Senior Fellow, Metropolitan Policy Program, Brookings Institution

      Senior Fellow, Center for Community Progress, Senior Scholar, George Warren School of Social Work, Washington University in St. Louis

      Areas of Interest

        About

        Paul C. Brophy is a principal with Brophy & Reilly, LLC – a consulting firm specializing in economic development, housing and community development, and the management of complex urban redevelopment projects – and a Nonresident Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution, a Senior Advisor to the Center for Community Progress, and a Senior Scholar at the Brown School at Washington University in St. Louis. One of Brophy’s specialties is the improvement of older industrial cities and the neighborhoods within those cities. He is also Senior Advisor to Enterprise Community Partners. Prior to his forming Brophy & Reilly, LLC in 1993, Brophy was President and Co-CEO of the Enterprise Foundation and Executive Director of ACTION-Housing Inc., a nonprofit housing development and neighborhood enhancement organization located in Pittsburgh. He was Director of the first Department of Housing for the City of Pittsburgh, and the Executive Director of the City’s Urban Redevelopment Authority, responsible for downtown and neighborhood improvement.

        Selected Publications

        Brophy, Paul C. 2013. A Market-Oriented Approach to Neighborhoods. In Revitalizing American Cities, Susan M. Wachter and Kimberly Zeuli, eds. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.

        Brophy, Paul C., and Alice Shabecoff. 2001. A Guide to Careers in Community Development. Washington, DC: Island Press.

        Nenno, Mary K., Paul Brophy, Michael Barker. 1982. Housing and Local Government. Washington, DC: International City Management Association.

        Ahlbrandt, Roger S. and Paul C. Brophy. 1975. Neighborhood Revitalization: Theory and Practice. Boston: Lexington Books.

        Fellow

        James Cloar

        x

        Downtown Advisory Services

        Areas of Interest

          About

          Jim Cloar is an expert on downtown development and non-profit management structures. His recent projects include consulting for Wichita, KS, Tulsa, OK and Burlington VT on their downtown management structures. He is on the Board of Commissioners of the Tampa Housing Authority, the Board of Directors of the National Civic League and the Henry B. Plant Museum.  Cloar previously served as the President and CEO of the Partnership for Downtown St. Louis and chaired the City’s Downtown Economic Stimulus Authority. He also headed downtown associations in Dallas, TX and Tampa, FL. Cloar served nineteen years on the Board of Directors of the International Downtown Association (IDA) and is a former Chair of the organization. He has also been the President of the Urban Land Institute (ULI) and is a former Chair of ULI’s Public-Private Partnership Council. He is the recipient of several awards, including the St. Louis Mayor’s “Quality of Life” Award, and the Dan E. Sweat “Lifetime Achievement in Downtown Leadership” Award” from the IDA. 

          Selected Publications

          Cloar, James A. 1990. Centralized Retail Management: New Strategies for Downtown. Washington, DC: Urban Land Institute. 

          Affiliated PhD Student

          Anthony DeFusco

          x

          Doctoral Student in Applied Economics, University of Pennsylvania

          Areas of Interest

            About

            Anthony DeFusco is a Doctoral Student in Applied Economics at The Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. His research interests include public economics, urban economics, and real estate finance. DeFusco received his Bachelor of the Arts in Mathematics and Mathematical Economics from Temple University in 2009. Prior to graduate school, he spent some time as a research assistant at the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia.

            Selected Publications

            DeFusco, Anthony A., and Andrew D. Paciorek (2014). "The Interest Rate Elasticity of Mortgage Demand: Evidence from Bunching at the Conforming Loan Limit" Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2014-11. Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).

            DeFusco, Anthony, Wenjie Ding, Fernando Ferreira, and Joseph Gyourko (2013). “The Role of Contagion in the Last American Housing Cycle.” Wharton School, mimeo.

            Penn IUR Scholar

            Rebecca Diamond

            x

            Assistant Professor of Economics, Stanford Graduate School of Business

            About

            Rebecca Diamond is an Assistant Professor of Economics at the Stanford Graduate School of Business. She is an applied micro economist studying local labor and housing markets. Her recent research focuses on the causes and consequences of diverging economic growth across U.S. cities and its effects on inequality. She was a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research from 2013 to 2014. 

            Selected Publications

            Diamond, Rebecca, Thomas Barrios, Guido W. Imbens, and Michal Kolesár. 2012. Clustering, Spatial Correlations, and Randomization Inference. Journal of the American Statistical Association 107(498): 578-591.

            Diamond, Rebecca. 2013. The Determinants and Welfare Implications of U.S. Workers’ Diverging Location Choices by Skill: 1980-2000 (working paper).

            Diamond, Rebecca. 2014. Housing Supply Elasticity and Rent Extraction by State and Local Governments (working paper).

            Faculty Fellow

            Gilles Duranton

            x

            Chair and Professor of Real Estate

            About

            Gilles Durantonis Professor of Real Estate in the Real Estate Department at The Wharton School. His research focuses on urban and regional development, transportation, and local public finance. Prior to joining the Real Estate Department in 2012, Duranton taught at the University of Toronto for seven years, and the London School of Economics for nine years.  He is the co-editor of the Journal of Urban Economics, and is an editorial board member for several journals. He is also affiliated with the Centre for Economic Policy Research in London, the Spatial Economics Research Centre at the London School of Economics, and the Rimini Centre for Economic Analysis. He currently serves as the chair of the Real Estate department at the Wharton School.

            Selected Publications

            Duranton, Gilles, Peter Morrow, and Matthew Turner. 2014. Roads and Trade: Evidence from the U.S. Review of Economic Studies, (forthcoming).

            Combes, Pierre-Philippe, Gilles Duranton, Laurent Gobillon, Diego Puga, and Sébastien Roux. 2012. The Productivity Advantages of Large Cities: Distinguishing Agglomeration from Firm Selection Econometrica, 80(6): 2543-2594.

            Duranton, Gilles and Matthew Turner. 2012. Urban Growth and Transportation. Review of Economic Studies, 79(4): 1407-1440.

            Duranton, Gilles and Matthew Turner. 2011. The Fundamental Law of Road Congestion: Evidence from the U.S. American Economic Review, 101(6): 2616-2652.

            Faculty Fellow

            Fernando Ferreira

            x

            Associate Professor, Departments of Real Estate, and Business Economics and Public Policy

            About

            Fernando Ferreira is Associate Professor, Departments of Real Estate, and Business Economics and Public Policy. His interests include public economics, urban economics, and real estate. He is also a Faculty Fellow and Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER), for which he co-edits the Journal of Public Economics. Ferreira has served as a visiting scholar at the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia and the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, and is the recipient of various research grants, including from the Ford Foundation and the U.S. Department of Education. 

            Selected Publications

            Ferreira, Fernando and Joel Waldfogel. 2013, Pop Internationalism: Has A Half Century of World Music Trade Displaced Local Culture? Economic Journal, 123(569): 634-664.

            Ferreira, Fernando, Joseph Gyourko and Joseph Tracy. 2012. Housing Busts and Household Mobility: An Update. Economic Policy Review, 18(3).

            Ferreira, Fernando and Joseph Gyourko.  2012. Heterogeneity in Neighborhood-level Price Growth in the U.S., 1993-2009. American Economic Review Papers and Proceedings, 102(3): 134-140.

            Ferreira, Fernando and Albert Saiz. Working. The Importance of Being “Ernesto”: Do Hispanics Affect the Housing Market?

            Ferreira, Fernando. 2010. You Can Take It with You: Proposition 13 Tax Benefits, Residential Mobility, and Willingness to Pay for Housing Amenities. Journal of Public Economics, 94: 661-673.

            Ferreira, Fernando, Joseph Gyourko and Joseph Tracy. 2010. Housing Busts and Household Mobility. Economic Policy Review, 68(1): 34-45.

            Fellow

            David Gest

            x

            Associate, Ballard Spahr

            Areas of Interest

              About

              David Gest is a real estate attorney and Associate at Ballard Spahr. He has worked with city planners, architects, landscape architects, and environmental consultants on major real estate development projects. Gest has also worked with city agencies and community groups on zoning and historic preservation matters. Gest is a member of the American Planning Association and the American Bar Association. His focus areas include zoning and land use. 

              Penn IUR Scholar

              Richard K. Green

              x

              Director, University of Southern California Lusk Center for Real Estate; Lusk Chair in Real Estate

              Professor, USC Sol Price School of Public Policy and the Marshall School of Business, University of Southern California

              Areas of Interest

                About

                Richard K. Green is the Director of the University of Southern California (USC) Lusk Center for Real Estate. Green is also the Lusk Chair in Real Estate and Professor at both the USC Sol Price School of Public Policy and the Marshall School of Business. Before joining USC, Green was the Oliver T. Carr Jr., Chair of Real Estate Finance at the George Washington University School of Business. He also taught real estate finance and economics courses at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and was principal economist and director of financial strategy and policy analysis at Freddie Mac. More recently, Green was a Visiting Professor of Real Estate at the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School. Green’s areas of expertise include real estate, housing markets, real estate finance and economics, mortgage finance, land policy, urban policy, transportation, tax policy, and housing policy. He is a member of two academic journal editorial boards and a reviewer for several others. 

                Selected Publications

                Green, Richard K. 2011. Thoughts on Rental Housing Market and Policy. Cityscape, A Journal of Policy, Development and Research, 13(2).

                Green, Richard K. and A. Reschovsky. 2011. “Using Tax Policy to Subsidize Homeownership.” In Public Spending and Incentives for Community Development Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, Aspen Institute, A. Staiger, ed.

                Green, R., and Susan Wachter. 2008. The Housing Finance Revolution (Proceedings of the 31st Annual Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City Economic Symposium).

                Faculty Fellow

                Jessie Handbury

                x

                Assistant Professor of Real Estate, The Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania

                About

                Jessie Handbury is an Assistant Professor of Real Estate at The University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School and a Faculty Research Fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER). Her research interests lie at the intersection of urban economics, trade, and industrial organization. Her recent articles use detailed data on retail sales to characterize how product prices and availability vary across U.S. cities and to measure the implications of this variation on household living costs.  Her current research examines spatial and socio-economic disparities in the availability and consumption of food products.  This work, supported by the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the Wharton Social Impact Initiative, seeks to understand the roles that differentials in price sensitivity, nutritional preferences, and retail access each play in explaining socio-economic disparities in nutrition. 

                Selected Publications

                Handbury, Jessie, and David E. Weinstein. Goods prices and availability in cities. The Review of Economic Studies, 2014.

                Handbury, Jessie. "Are poor cities cheap for everyone? non-homotheticity and the cost of living across us cities." Zell-Lurie working papers, 2014.

                Watanabe, Tsutomu, David Weinstein, and Jessie Handbury. "How Much Do Official Price Indexes Tell Us About Inflation?." 2014 Meeting Papers. No. 73. Society for Economic Dynamics, 2014.

                 

                Bring our latest initiatives, publications and events to your inbox.