People

Penn IUR is affiliated with more than 200 experts in the field of urbanism. Its Faculty Fellows program identifies faculty at the University of Pennsylvania with a demonstrated interest in urban research; the Penn IUR Scholars program identifies urban scholars outside of Penn; and the Penn IUR Fellows program identifies expert urban practitioners. Together, these programs foster a community of scholars and encourage cross-disciplinary collaboration.

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Affiliated PhD Student

Jane Abell

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Doctoral Candidate in Anthropology, University of Pennsylvania

About

Jane Lief Abell is a second year doctoral student in Anthropology at the University of Pennsylvania. Her research explores Islam in the United States, with a particular focus on how race and religion inform relations among "native" and immigrant Muslim groups. Currently, she is working with Al-Bustan Seeds of Culture, an Arabic language and arts organization based in West Philly, and conducting fieldwork in Northeast Philadelphia. Prior to entering graduate school, Jane held several research and editorial positions at the Center for Middle East Studies at Harvard University; Harvard Divinity School; the Berkman Center for Internet & Society; the Consortium on Gender, Security, and Human Rights; and Law People Management, LLC. Jane holds a BA with High Honors in Sociology & Anthropology and Islamic Studies from Swarthmore College. 

 

Penn IUR Scholar

Elijah Anderson

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William K. Lanman, Jr. Professor of Sociology, Yale University

About

Elijah Anderson is the William K. Lanman, Jr. Professor of Sociology at Yale University. He is widely considered one of the best urban ethnographers in the United States. His publications include Code of the Street: Decency, Violence, and the Moral Life of the Inner City (1999), winner of the Komarovsky Award from the Eastern Sociological Society; Streetwise: Race, Class, and Change in an Urban Community (1990), winner of the American Sociological Association’s Robert E. Park Award for the best published book in the area of Urban Sociology, and the classic sociological work, A Place on the Corner (1978, 2nd ed., 2003). Anderson’s most recent ethnographic work, The Cosmopolitan Canopy: Race and Civility in Everyday Life, was published by WW Norton in March 2012. Anderson is the 2013 recipient of the prestigious Cox-Johnson-Frazier Award of the American Sociological Association. His research interests include inequality, race relations, urban ethnography, sociology of culture, and crime, and social control.

Selected Publications

Anderson, Elijah, Dana Asbury, Duke W. Austin, Esther Chihye Kim, and Vani Kulkarni, eds. 2012. Bringing Fieldwork Back In: Contemporary Urban Ethnographic Research. The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science 642 (June). Sage Press.

Anderson, Elijah. 2012. The Cosmopolitan Canopy: Race and Civility in Everyday Life. New York: W. W. Norton & Company.

Anderson, Elijah, ed. 2009. Urban Ethnography: Its Traditions and Its Future. Ethnography 10(4), Special Double Issue. Sage Press. 

Anderson, Elijah, ed. 2008. Against the Wall: Poor, Young, Black, and Male. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.

Anderson, Elijah, Scott N. Brooks, Raymond Gunn, and Nikki Jones, eds. 2004. Being Here and Being There: Fieldwork Encounters and Ethnographic Discoveries. The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science 595 (September). New York: Sage Press.

Faculty Fellow

Jere Behrman

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William R. Kenan, Jr. Professor of Economics

About

Jere R. Behrman is W.R. Kenan Jr. Professor of Economics and Sociology in the School of Arts and Sciences. A leading international researcher in empirical microeconomics with a focus on developing economies, Behrman has been Chair of Economics, Research Associate and Director of Penn’s Population Studies Center, Associate Director of the Lauder Institute, and Associate Director of Penn’s Population Aging Research Center, among other positions in the University. He has been an investigator on over 160 research projects, including 42 National Institutes of Health (NIH) and 14 National Science Foundation (NSF) grants, and has published over 400 articles and 35 books. The unifying dimension of much of this research is to improve empirical knowledge of the determinants of and the impacts of human resources given unobserved factors such as innate health and ability, the functioning of various institutions such as households and imperfect markets, and information imperfections. 

Selected Publications

Behrman, Jere R., Susan W. Parker, Petra E. Todd, and Kenneth I. Wolpin. 2015. "Aligning Learning Incentives of Students and Teachers: Results from a Social Experiment in Mexican High Schools." Journal of Political Economy 123(2): 325-64.

Richter, Linda M., Bernadette Daelmans, Joan Lombardi, Jody Heymann, Florencia Lopez Boo, Jere R. Behrman, Chunling Lu, Jane E. Lucas, Rafael Perez-Escamilla, Tarun Dua, Zulfiqar A. Bhutta, Karin Stenberg, Paul Gertler, and Gary L. Darmstadt. "Investing in the Foundation of Sustainable Development: Pathways to Scale up for Early Childhood Development. 2017. " The Lancet.

Allen, Franklin, Jere R. Behrman, Nancy Birdsall, Shahrokh Fardoust, Dani Rodrik, Andrew Steer, and Arvind Subramanian. 2014. Towards a Better Global Economy: Policy Implications for Global Citizens in the 21st Century. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Almedia, Rita, Jere Behrman, and David Robalino, editors. 2012. The Right Skills for the Job? Rethinking Effective Training Policies for Workers. Washington, DC: Social Protection, Human Development Network, World Bank. 

Penn IUR Scholar

Carolyn Chernoff

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Visiting Assistant Professor of Sociology, Skidmore College

About

Carolyn Chernoff is a Visiting Assistant Professor of Sociology at Skidmore College. She is an urban and cultural sociologist specializing in the role of culture in reproducing and transforming urban inequality. While a doctoral student at the University of Pennsylvania, Chernoff received the 2013 Arnold Award for Outstanding Contribution by a Doctoral Student from the Graduate School of Education, the Dean's Scholarship (GSE), and served as a 2012-2013 Graduate Fellow for Teaching Excellence at Penn's Center for Teaching and Learning. Chernoff’s work focuses on cities, arts, and social change, particularly on the level of social interaction and the production of community. Her dissertation, “Imagining the City: Ritual and Conflict in the Urban Art Democracy,” is based on ethnographic research conducted over a period of eight years at three different community-arts organizations in a major Mid-Atlantic city. 

Selected Publications

Chernoff, Carolyn. 2013, forthcoming. Spelling It Out: Difference and Diversity in Public Conversation. Michigan Sociological Review, 27.

Chernoff, Carolyn. 2013. “Conflict Theory in Education.” In Sociology of Education, James Ainsworth and Geoffrey J. Golson, eds. Sage Publications.

Chernoff, Carolyn. 2013. “Waldorf Education.” In Sociology of Education, James Ainsworth and Geoffrey J. Golson, eds. Sage Publications.

Chernoff, Carolyn. 2010. Objectifying Measures: The Dominance of High-Stakes Testing and the Politics of Schooling – By Amanda Walker Johnson. Anthropology & Education Quarterly, 41: 212–213.

Chernoff, Carolyn.  2009. On Culture, Art, and Experience. Perspectives on Urban Education (Penn GSE electronic journal), 6(2): 77-78.

Faculty Fellow

Daniel Aldana Cohen

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Assistant Professor

About

Daniel Aldana Cohen is Assistant Professor of Sociology in the School of Arts and Sciences. He researches and writes on climate politics, investigating the intersections of climate change, inequalities of race and social class, and the political projects of both elites and social movements in global cities of the North and South. Cohen's work has been published in Nature, Public Culture, Jacobin, Dissent, Public Books, NACLA Report on the Americas, and elsewhere.

Selected Publications

Wachsmuth, David, Daniel Aldana Cohen, and Hillary Angelo. 2016. “Expand the frontiers of urban sustainability: Social equity and global impacts are missing from measures of cities' environments friendliness.” Nature 536(7618): 391-393.

Cohen, Daniel Aldana. 2016. “The Rationed City: The politics of water, housing, and land use in drought-parched São Paulo.” Public Culture 28(2): 261-289.

Penn IUR Scholar

Zaire Zenit Dinzey-Flores

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Associate Professor, Latino and Hispanic Caribbean Studies and Sociology, Rutgers University

About

Zaire Z. Dinzey-Flores is Associate Professor of Sociology and Latino and Hispanic Caribbean Studies at Rutgers University. She was previously the Andrew W. Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow on Race, Crime, and Justice at the Vera Institute of Justice in New York City. Dinzey-Flores has a number of research interests including urban and community sociology, urban planning, race and ethnicity, space and place, qualitative and quantitative methods, social policy, and Latin America and Caribbean Studies. Dinzey-Flores has published articles on public housing policy and design in Puerto Rico, race and class segregation and inequality in Puerto Rico, reggaetón music and culture as an urban phenomenon, and what it means to acknowledge Latinos in the urban intellectual history of the United States. Her recent book, Locked In, Locked Out: Gated Communities in a Puerto Rican City (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2013) looks at questions of race and class inequality as they are recreated and contained in the physical built environment.

Selected Publications

Dinzey-Flores, Zaire Zenit. 2013. Locked In, Locked Out. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.

Faculty Fellow

David Grazian

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Associate Professor of Sociology; Graduate Chair

About

David Grazian is Associate Professor of Sociology and Graduate Chair in the Department of Sociology in the School of Arts and Sciences. His research areas include sociology of culture, popular culture and mass media, urban sociology, symbolic interaction, race and ethnicity, ethnographic methods and social theory. Grazian teaches courses on popular culture, mass media and the arts, cities and urban sociology, social interaction and public behavior, and ethnographic methods. In his research he employs a variety of ethnographic and other qualitative methods to study the production and consumption of commercial entertainment in the urban milieu. He recently received a fellowship from the Institute for Advanced Studies (IAS) in Princeton, New Jersey to pursue his research full time during the 2013-2014 academic year. During his sabbatical year of residence, Grazian will complete a book manuscript on metropolitan zoos as repositories of culture as well as nature. The book is tentatively titled Where the Wild Things Aren’t: City Zoos and the Culture of Nature.

Selected Publications

Grazian, David. 2017. Mix it Up: Popular Culture, Mass Media, and Society, 2nd Edition. New York: W.W. Norton.

Grazian, David. 2016. American Zoo: A Sociological Safari. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.

Garner, Betsie and David Grazian. 2016. “Naturalizing Gender through Childhood Socialization Messages in a Zoo.” Social Psychology Quarterly 79(3): 181-198.

Grazian, David. 2011. On the Make: The Hustle of Urban Nightlife. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Grazian, David. 2005. Blue Chicago: The Search for Authenticity in Urban Blues Clubs. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Faculty Fellow

Mauro Guillén

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Dr. Felix Zandman Professor of International Management

Director, Lauder Institute

About

Mauro Guillén is the Dr. Felix Zandman Professor of International Management and Director of The Lauder Institute at The Wharton School. His research interests include organizational theory, economic sociology, international management, international banking strategies, and emerging economies. He previously taught at the MIT Sloan School of Management. He is a member of the advisory board of the Escuela de Finanzas Aplicadas (Grupo Analistas), and serves on the World Economic Forum’s Global Agenda Council on Emerging Multinationals. He has received a Wharton MBA Core Teaching Award, a Wharton Graduate Association Teaching Award, a Wharton Teaching Commitment and Curricular Innovation Award, the Gulf Publishing Company Best Paper Award of the Academy of Management, the W. Richard Scott Best Paper Award of the American Sociological Association, the Gustavus Myers Center Award for Outstanding Book on Human Rights, and the President’s Book Award of the Social Science History Association. Guillén is an Elected Fellow of the Macro Organizational Behavior Society, a former Guggenheim and Fulbright Fellow, and a Member in the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton. 

Selected Publications

Guillen, Mauro. 2016. The Architecture of Collapse: The Global System in the 21st Century. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016.

Berges, Angel, Mauro Guillen, Juan Pedro Moreno, and Emilio Ontiveros. 2014. A New Era in Banking: The Landscape after the Battle. Brookline, MA: Bibliomotion.

Guillen, Mauro and Laurence Capron. 2015. “State Capacity, Minority Shareholder Protections, and Stock Market Development.” Administrative Science Quarterly 61(1):125-160.

Heather Berry, Mauro Guillen, and Arun S. Hendi. 2014. “Is there Convergence across Countries? A Spatial Approach.” Journal of International Business Studies 45: 387-404.

Guillen, Mauro, editor. 2013. Women Entrepreneurs: Inspiring Stories from Developing Countries and Emerging Economies. New York: Routledge.

Faculty Fellow

Kathleen Hall

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Associate Professor of Education and Anthropology

Chair, Literacy, Culture, and International Education Division

About

Kathleen Hall is Associate Professor of Education and Anthropology in the Education, Culture, and Society Division and Chair of the Literacy, Culture, and International Education Division in the Graduate School of Education with a secondary appointment in the Department of Anthropology. She is a member of the graduate groups in Sociology, Folklore, Social Policy & Practice, and South Asia Studies and is affiliated with the Urban Studies and Asian American Studies programs. She received the Michael Katz Excellence in Teaching Award in the Urban Studies Program in 2001 and the Provost’s Award for Distinguished Ph.D Teaching and Mentoring in 2009. Her research and publications focus on immigration, citizenship, racial and class inequality, and national incorporation in the United Kingdom and the United States; the politics of knowledge in public sector policy and governance; risk management, human rights, and anti-terrorism law in the United Kingdom; and concepts of "global citizenship" and related efforts to "internationalize" K-16 education in the U.S. and the U.K. Before joining the GSE faculty in 1995, Hall was a postdoctoral Fellow at Chapin Hall Center for Children at the University of Chicago, where she conducted research on community-based poverty initiatives. 

Selected Publications

Stambach, Amy and Kathleen D. Hall, eds. 2017. Anthropological Perspectives on Student Futures: Youth and the Politics of Possibility. Palgrave Macmillan.

Hall, K. D. 2012. “Security and the Risk Management State: British Anti-Terrorism Policies After 7/7.” In Politics, Publics, Personhood: New Ethnographies at the Limits of Neoliberalism, edited by C. Greenhouse. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press. 

Hall, K. D. 2009. British Sikh Lives Lived in Translation. Everyday Life in South Asia, 2nd Edition. Bloomington: University of Indiana Press.

McDermott, R., and K.D. Hall. 2007. “Scientifically Debased Research on Learning, 1854-2006.” Anthropology and Education Quarterly 38(11): 82-88.

Faculty Fellow

Renata Holod

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College of Women Class of 1963 Term Professor in the Humanities

Curator, Near East Section, Penn Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology

About

Renata Holod is College of Women Class of 1963 Term Professor in the Humanities, History of Art Department; and Curator in the Near East Section, Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, both at the University of Pennsylvania. She has carried out archeological and architectural fieldwork in Syria, Iran, Morocco, Turkey, Central Asia, Tunisia, and Ukraine.

She is co-author and co-editor of City in the Desert (1978); Architecture and Community: Building in the Islamic World Today, Aperture, New York, (1983); The Mosque and the Modern World (1997); The City in the Islamic World (2008) and An Island Through Time: Jerba Studies (2009).

She was Convenor, Steering Committee Member, and Chair, Master Jury of the Aga Khan Award for Architecture; and was Director, Assessment Board, Aga Khan Trust for Culture, 2012-2013.

She sits on several advisory boards including the Fondation Max Van Berchem, Muqarnas, Annual in Islamic Art and Visual Culture; International Journal of Islamic Architecture; Ars Asiatiques; and Center for the Study of Material and Visual Cultures of Religion, Yale University. She has served as President, Board of Trustees at The Ukrainian Museum June 2013 - June 2017. 

Selected Publications

Jayyuusi, Salma Khadra, Renata Holod, Attilio Petruccioli, Andre Raymond. 2008. The City in the Islamic World. Brill Academic Pub.

Holod, Renata and Hasan-Uddin Khan. 1997. The Mosque and the Modern World: Architects, Patrons, and Designs Since the 1950s. Thames and Hudson.

Holod, Renata, Hmet Evin, and Suha Özkan, eds. 1984. Modern Turkish Architecture, 1st ed. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.

Holod, Renata. 1983. Architecture and Community: Building in the Islamic World Today: The Aga Khan Award for Architecture. New York: Aperture.

Grabar, Oleg, Renata Holod, James Knustad, and William Trousdale. 1978. City in the Desert: An Account of the Archaeological Expedition to Qasr al-Hayr al-Sharqi, Syria. Harvard Middle East Monograph Series 23/24. Cambridge: Harvard University Press.

Faculty Fellow

John Jackson, Jr.

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Dean, School of Social Policy & Practice

Richard Perry University Professor

Penn Integrates Knowledge (PIK) Professor

About

ohn L. Jackson, Jr., is Dean of the School of Social Policy & Practice and Richard Perry University Professor at the University of Pennsylvania. Jackson received his BA in Communication (Radio/TV/Film) summa cum laude from Howard University (1993), earned his PhD in Anthropology with distinction from Columbia University (2000), and served as a junior fellow at the Harvard University Society of Fellows (1999-2002). He is the author of Harlemworld: Doing Race and Class in Contemporary Black America (University of Chicago Press, 2001); Real Black: Adventures in Racial Sincerity (University of Chicago Press, 2005); Racial Paranoia: The Unintended Consequences of Political Correctness (Basic Civitas, 2008); Thin Description: Ethnography and the African Hebrew Israelites of Jerusalem (Harvard University Press, 2013); Impolite Conversations: On Race, Politics, Sex, Money, and Religion, co-written with Cora Daniels (Atria/Simon & Schuster, 2014), and Televised Redemption: Black Religious Media and Racial Empowerment (NYU Press, 2016), co-written with Carolyn Rouse and Marla Frederick. His is also editor of Social Policy and Social Justice (2016), distributed by the University of Pennsylvania Press. His most recently completed film, co-directed with Deborah A. Thomas, is Bad Friday: Rastafari after Coral Gardens (Third World Newsreel, 2012). Jackson previously served as Senior Advisor to the Provost on Diversity and Associate Dean of Administration in the Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Pennsylvania. 

Selected Publications

Jackson, John L. 2016. Social Policy and Social Justice. Philadelphia, PA: University of Pennsylvania Press.

Jackson, John L., Carolyn Rouse, and Marla Frederick. 2016. Televised Redemption: The Media Production of Black Muslims, Jews, and Christians. New York City: New York University Press.

Jackson, John L. and Cora Daniels. 2014. Impolite Conversations: On Race, Class, Sex, Religion, and Politics. New York City: Atria Books [Simon and Schuster imprint].

Jackson, John L. 2013. Thin Description: Ethnography and the African Hebrew Israelites of Jerusalem. Cambridge: Harvard University Press.

Jackson, John L. 2008. Racial Paranoia: The Unintended Consequences of Political Correctness. New York City: Basic Civitas.

Penn IUR Scholar

Ken Jackson

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Jacques Barzun Professor in History and the Social Sciences, Department of History

Director, Herbert H. Lehman Center for American History, Columbia University

About

Ken Jackson is the Jacques Barzun Professor in History and the Social Sciences in the Department of History and the Director of the Herbert H. Lehman Center for American History at Columbia University. He was formerly the Chair of the Department of History. Jackson’s areas of expertise include urban, social, and military history. He has served as President for several organizations, including the Urban History Association and the Society of American Historians, and is the recipient of many awards, including the Bancroft Prize and the Francis Parkman Prize for his book “Crabgrass Frontier.” His research and work largely focus on the urban history of New York City. Jackson has been affiliated with many organizations, including the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the New York Historical Society, the National Council for History Education, and the Society of American Historians. At Columbia, Jackson teaches the class “The History of New York,” well known for its midnight bike ride from campus to Brooklyn. 

Selected Publications

Jackson, Ken. 1996. All the World's a Mall: Reflections on the Social and Economic Consequences of the American Shopping Center. American Historical Review, October: 1111-1121.

Jackson, Ken. 1998. NCHE: Where School and University Meet. The History Teacher,  February.

Jackson, Ken. 1998. Manila John of Guadacanal: Hero of the Pacific War. In Forgotten Heroes of American History, Susan Ware, ed. New York: Basic Books.

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