People

Penn IUR is affiliated with more than 200 experts in the field of urbanism. Its Faculty Fellows program identifies faculty at the University of Pennsylvania with a demonstrated interest in urban research; the Penn IUR Scholars program identifies urban scholars outside of Penn; and the Penn IUR Fellows program identifies expert urban practitioners. Together, these programs foster a community of scholars and encourage cross-disciplinary collaboration.

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Affiliated PhD Student

Jane Abell

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Doctoral Candidate in Anthropology, University of Pennsylvania

About

Jane Lief Abell is a second year doctoral student in Anthropology at the University of Pennsylvania. Her research explores Islam in the United States, with a particular focus on how race and religion inform relations among "native" and immigrant Muslim groups. Currently, she is working with Al-Bustan Seeds of Culture, an Arabic language and arts organization based in West Philly, and conducting fieldwork in Northeast Philadelphia. Prior to entering graduate school, Jane held several research and editorial positions at the Center for Middle East Studies at Harvard University; Harvard Divinity School; the Berkman Center for Internet & Society; the Consortium on Gender, Security, and Human Rights; and Law People Management, LLC. Jane holds a BA with High Honors in Sociology & Anthropology and Islamic Studies from Swarthmore College. 

 

Penn IUR Scholar

Elijah Anderson

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William K. Lanman, Jr. Professor of Sociology, Yale University

About

Elijah Anderson is the William K. Lanman, Jr. Professor of Sociology at Yale University. He is widely considered one of the best urban ethnographers in the United States. His publications include Code of the Street: Decency, Violence, and the Moral Life of the Inner City (1999), winner of the Komarovsky Award from the Eastern Sociological Society; Streetwise: Race, Class, and Change in an Urban Community (1990), winner of the American Sociological Association’s Robert E. Park Award for the best published book in the area of Urban Sociology, and the classic sociological work, A Place on the Corner (1978, 2nd ed., 2003). Anderson’s most recent ethnographic work, The Cosmopolitan Canopy: Race and Civility in Everyday Life, was published by WW Norton in March 2012. Anderson is the 2013 recipient of the prestigious Cox-Johnson-Frazier Award of the American Sociological Association. His research interests include inequality, race relations, urban ethnography, sociology of culture, and crime, and social control.

Selected Publications

Anderson, Elijah, Dana Asbury, Duke W. Austin, Esther Chihye Kim, and Vani Kulkarni, eds. 2012. Bringing Fieldwork Back In: Contemporary Urban Ethnographic Research. The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science 642 (June). Sage Press.

Anderson, Elijah. 2012. The Cosmopolitan Canopy: Race and Civility in Everyday Life. New York: W. W. Norton & Company.

Anderson, Elijah, ed. 2009. Urban Ethnography: Its Traditions and Its Future. Ethnography 10(4), Special Double Issue. Sage Press. 

Anderson, Elijah, ed. 2008. Against the Wall: Poor, Young, Black, and Male. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.

Anderson, Elijah, Scott N. Brooks, Raymond Gunn, and Nikki Jones, eds. 2004. Being Here and Being There: Fieldwork Encounters and Ethnographic Discoveries. The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science 595 (September). New York: Sage Press.

Faculty Fellow

Jere Behrman

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William R. Kenan, Jr. Professor of Economics, University of Pennsylvania

About

Professor Behrman is also a Research Associate at Penn’s Population Studies Center and he serves as the Economics/Social Science member of the National Institutes of Health (NIH)/National Institute of Child Health and Development (NICHD) National Advisory Council. He is a leading international researcher in empirical microeconomics, with emphasis on developing economies.  His research interests include empirical microeconomics, labor economics, human resources (early childhood development, education, health, nutrition), project evaluation, economic demography, incentive systems and household behaviors. The unifying dimension of much of this research is to improve empirical knowledge of the determinants of and the impacts of human resources given unobserved factors such as innate health and ability, the functioning of various institutions such as households and imperfect markets, and information imperfections. He has published over 350 professional articles (primarily in leading general and field economic journals, also in leading demographic, sociology, nutritional and biomedical journals) and thirty-three books.  He has been a researcher with the World Bank, Asian Development Bank, Inter-American Development Bank, United Nations Development Program, other international organizations and various governments. He has been a principal investigator on over seventy research projects funded by the U.S. National Institutes of Health (twenty-three grants), U.S. National Science Foundation (thirteen grants), and a number of other governmental and foundation sources.  He has been involved in professional research or lecturing in over forty countries. He has received honors including: Fulbright 40th Anniversary Distinguished Fellow, Econometric Society Fellow, Guggenheim Foundation Fellow, Ford Foundation Fellow and 2008 biennial Carlos Diaz-Alejandro Prize for outstanding research contributions to Latin America. In December 2011 he was awarded a Doctor Honoris Causa by the University of Chile.

Faculty Fellow

Phillipe Bourgois

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Richard Perry University Professor of Anthropology and Family and Community Medicine

About

Philippe Bourgois is the Richard Perry University Professor of Anthropology and Family and Community Medicine in the Department of Anthropology, School of Arts and Sciences. He has conducted fieldwork in Central America (Costa Rica, Panama, Nicaragua, El Salvador, and Belize) and in the urban United States (East Harlem in New York and San Francisco). In Central America his research addresses the political mobilization of ethnicity, immigration and labor relations, political violence, popular resistance, and the social dislocation of street children. His research in the United States confronts inner-city social suffering and critiques the political economy and cultural contours of US apartheid. He is also addressing gender power relations, and the intersections between structural and intimate violence. His most recent work focuses on substance abuse, violence, homelessness, and HIV-prevention. He has received numerous academic and grant awards including most recently a John Simon Guggenheim Award (2014).

Selected Publications

Karandinos G, Hart L, Montero Castrillo F, Bourgois P. 2014. Moral Economy of Violence in the U.S. Inner City. Current Anthropology. 55(1): 1–22.

Messac L, Ciccarone D, Draine J and Bourgois P. 2013. The Good-Enough Science-and-Politics of Anthropological Collaboration with Evidence-Based Clinical Research: Four Ethnographic Case Studies. Social Science & Medicine. 99: 176–186.

Philippe I. Bourgois, Jeffrey Schonberg. 2009. Righteous Dopefiend. University of California Press.

Scheper-Hughes, N. and P. Bourgois, eds. 2004. Violence in War and Peace: An Anthology. Oxford: Blackwell Publishing.

Bourgois. P. 2003, second updated edition. In Search of Respect: Selling Crack in El Barrio. New York: Cambridge University Press. 

Penn IUR Scholar

Carolyn Chernoff

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Visiting Assistant Professor of Sociology, Skidmore College

About

Carolyn Chernoff is a Visiting Assistant Professor of Sociology at Skidmore College. She is an urban and cultural sociologist specializing in the role of culture in reproducing and transforming urban inequality. While a doctoral student at the University of Pennsylvania, Chernoff received the 2013 Arnold Award for Outstanding Contribution by a Doctoral Student from the Graduate School of Education, the Dean's Scholarship (GSE), and served as a 2012-2013 Graduate Fellow for Teaching Excellence at Penn's Center for Teaching and Learning. Chernoff’s work focuses on cities, arts, and social change, particularly on the level of social interaction and the production of community. Her dissertation, “Imagining the City: Ritual and Conflict in the Urban Art Democracy,” is based on ethnographic research conducted over a period of eight years at three different community-arts organizations in a major Mid-Atlantic city. 

Selected Publications

Chernoff, Carolyn. 2013, forthcoming. Spelling It Out: Difference and Diversity in Public Conversation. Michigan Sociological Review, 27.

Chernoff, Carolyn. 2013. “Conflict Theory in Education.” In Sociology of Education, James Ainsworth and Geoffrey J. Golson, eds. Sage Publications.

Chernoff, Carolyn. 2013. “Waldorf Education.” In Sociology of Education, James Ainsworth and Geoffrey J. Golson, eds. Sage Publications.

Chernoff, Carolyn. 2010. Objectifying Measures: The Dominance of High-Stakes Testing and the Politics of Schooling – By Amanda Walker Johnson. Anthropology & Education Quarterly, 41: 212–213.

Chernoff, Carolyn.  2009. On Culture, Art, and Experience. Perspectives on Urban Education (Penn GSE electronic journal), 6(2): 77-78.

Penn IUR Scholar

Zaire Zenit Dinzey-Flores

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Associate Professor, Latino and Hispanic Caribbean Studies and Sociology, Rutgers University

About

Zaire Z. Dinzey-Flores is Associate Professor of Sociology and Latino and Hispanic Caribbean Studies at Rutgers University. She was previously the Andrew W. Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow on Race, Crime, and Justice at the Vera Institute of Justice in New York City. Dinzey-Flores has a number of research interests including urban and community sociology, urban planning, race and ethnicity, space and place, qualitative and quantitative methods, social policy, and Latin America and Caribbean Studies. Dinzey-Flores has published articles on public housing policy and design in Puerto Rico, race and class segregation and inequality in Puerto Rico, reggaetón music and culture as an urban phenomenon, and what it means to acknowledge Latinos in the urban intellectual history of the United States. Her recent book, Locked In, Locked Out: Gated Communities in a Puerto Rican City (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2013) looks at questions of race and class inequality as they are recreated and contained in the physical built environment.

Selected Publications

Dinzey-Flores, Zaire Zenit. 2013. Locked In, Locked Out. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.

Faculty Fellow

David Grazian

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Associate Professor of Sociology

About

David Grazian is Associate Professor of Sociology in the Department of Sociology in the School of Arts and Sciences. His research areas include sociology of culture, popular culture and mass media, urban sociology, symbolic interaction, race and ethnicity, ethnographic methods and social theory. Grazian teaches courses on popular culture, mass media and the arts, cities and urban sociology, social interaction and public behavior, and ethnographic methods. In his research he employs a variety of ethnographic and other qualitative methods to study the production and consumption of commercial entertainment in the urban milieu.. He recently received a fellowship from the Institute for Advanced Studies (IAS) in Princeton, New Jersey to pursue his research full time during the 2013-2014 academic year. During his sabbatical year of residence, Grazian will complete a book manuscript on metropolitan zoos as repositories of culture as well as nature. The book is tentatively titled Where the Wild Things Aren’t: City Zoos and the Culture of Nature.

Selected Publications

Grazian, David. 2010. Mix It Up: Popular Culture, Mass Media, and Society. W.W. Norton.

Grazian, David. 2008. On the Make: The Hustle of Urban Nightlife. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Grazian, David. 2003. Blue Chicago: The Search for Authenticity in Urban Blues Clubs. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Grazian, David. A Digital Revolution? 2005. A Reassessment of New Media and Cultural Production in the Digital Age. Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science 597: 209-222. 

Grazian, David. 2004. Opportunities for Ethnography in the Sociology of Music. Poetics: Journal of Empirical Research on Culture, the Media and the Arts 32(3-4): 197-210.

Faculty Fellow

Mauro Guillén

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Dr. Felix Zandman Professor of International Management, Director, The Lauder Institute

Professor Sociology (secondary appointment)

About

Mauro Guillén is the Dr. Felix Zandman Professor of International Management and the Director of The Lauder Institute at The Wharton School, and holds a secondary appointment as Professor of Sociology in the Department of Sociology in the School of Arts and Sciences. His research interests include organizational theory, economic sociology, international management, international banking strategies, and emerging economies. He previously taught at the MIT Sloan School of Management. He is a member of the advisory board of the Escuela de Finanzas Aplicadas (Grupo Analistas), and serves on the World Economic Forum’s Global Agenda Council on Emerging Multinationals. He has received a Wharton MBA Core Teaching Award, a Wharton Graduate Association Teaching Award, a Wharton Teaching Commitment and Curricular Innovation Award, the Gulf Publishing Company Best Paper Award of the Academy of Management, the W. Richard Scott Best Paper Award of the American Sociological Association, the Gustavus Myers Center Award for Outstanding Book on Human Rights, and the President’s Book Award of the Social Science History Association. Guillén is an Elected Fellow of the Macro Organizational Behavior Society, a former Guggenheim and Fulbright Fellow, and a Member in the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton. 

Selected Publications

Guillén, Mauro F., ed. 2013. Women Entrepreneurs: Inspiring Stories from Emerging Economies and Developing Countries. New York: Routledge. Guillén, Mauro F., and Emilio Ontiveros. 2012. Global Turning Points: Understanding the Challenges for Business in the Twenty-First Century. New York: Cambridge University Press,

Guillén, Mauro and Esteban Garcia-Canal. 2012. Emerging Markets Rule: Growth Strategies of the New Global Markets. New York: McGraw-Hill.

Guillén, Mauro and Esteban Garcia-Canal. 2010. The New Multinationals: Spanish Firms in a Global Context. Cambridge University Press. 

Faculty Fellow

Kathleen D. Hall

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Associate Professor of Education and Anthropology, Education, Culture, and Society Division

Associate Professor of Education Associated Faculty (secondary appointment)

About

Kathleen D. Hall is Associate Professor of Education and Anthropology in the Education, Culture, and Society Division of the Graduate School of Education with a secondary appointment in the Department of Anthropology. She is a member of the graduate groups in Sociology, Folklore, Social Policy and Practice, and South Asia Studies and is affiliated with the Urban Studies and Asian American Studies programs. She received the Michael Katz Excellence in Teaching Award in the Urban Studies Program in 2001 and the Provost’s Award for Distinguished Ph.D Teaching and Mentoring in 2009. Her research and publications focus on: immigration, citizenship, racial and class inequality, and national incorporation in the United Kingdom and the United States; the politics of knowledge in public sector policy and governance; risk management, human rights, and anti-terrorism law in the United Kingdom; and concepts of "global citizenship" and related efforts to "internationalize" K-16 education in the US and the UK Before joining the GSE faculty in 1995, Hall was a postdoctoral Fellow at Chapin Hall Center for Children at the University of Chicago, where she conducted research on community-based poverty initiatives. 

Selected Publications

Hall, K. D. 2010. Security and the Risk Management State: British Anti-Terrorism Policies After 7/7. In New Ethnographies at the Limits of Neoliberalism, C. Greenhouse, ed. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press. 

Hall, K. D. 2009. British Sikh Lives Lived in Translation. Everyday Life in South Asia, 2nd Edition. Bloomington: University of Indiana Press.

Hall, K. D. 2005. Science, Globalization and Educational Governance: The Political Rationalities of the New Managerialism. The Indiana Journal of Global Legal Studies. Special edition on Globalization and Education 12(1): 153-182.

Hall, K. D. 2004. The Ethnography of Imagined Communities: The Cultural Production of Sikh Ethnicity in Britain. In Being Here and Being There: Fieldwork Encounters and Ethnographic Discoveries,  E. Anderson, S. Brooks, R. Gunn, and N. Jones, eds. The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science [Special Issue]: 595.

Faculty Fellow

Renata Holod

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College of Women Class of 1963 Professor, History of Art, School of Arts and Sciences

Curator, Near East Section, Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology

About

Renata Holod is Professor of the History of Art in the School of Arts and Sciences, and Curator of the Near East Section in the Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology. She is an affiliated faculty member with the School of Arts and Science’s Middle East Center. Holod has done archaeological and architectural fieldwork in Syria, Iran, Morocco, Central Asia and Turkey, and completed an archaeological/ethno-historical survey on the island of Jerba, Tunisia. She has served as Convenor, Steering Committee Member, and Master Jury Chair of the Aga Khan Award for Architecture. She also served as consultant to Skidmore, Owings and Merrill (SOM), Arthur Ericson Architects, Venturi Scott-Brown Architects, Mitchell/Giurgola Associates, H2L2, and Michael Graves& Associates, and the Center for Architecture in NYC. In 2004, the Islamic Environmental Research Centre honored her with an Award for outstanding work in Islamic Architectural Studies. In 2010, she received the Provost’s Award for Distinguished Ph.D. Teaching and Mentoring.

Selected Publications

Grabar, Oleg, Renata Holod, James Knustad, and William Trousdale. 1978. City in the Desert: An Account of the Archaeological Expedition to Qasr al-Hayr al-Sharqi, Syria. Harvard Middle East Monograph Series 23/24. Cambridge: Harvard University Press.

Holod, Renata. 1983. Architecture and Community: Building in the Islamic World Today: The Aga Khan Award for Architecture. New York: Aperture.

Holod, Renata, Hmet Evin, and Suha Özkan, eds. 1984. Modern Turkish Architecture, 1st ed. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.

Holod, Renata and Hasan-Uddin Khan. 1997. The Mosque and the Modern World: rchitects, Patrons and Designs Since the 1950s. Thames and Hudson.

Jayyuusi, Salma Khadra, Renata Holod, Attilio Petruccioli, Andre Raymond. 2008. The City in the Islamic World. Brill Academic Pub.

Faculty Fellow

John L. Jackson, Jr.

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Richard Perry University Professor of Communication, Africana Studies, and Anthropology

Associate Dean for Administration

About

John L Jackson, Jr .is Richard Perry University Professor of Communication, Africana Studies, and Anthropology, in the Annenberg School for Communication and the School of Arts and Sciences, and Associate Dean for Administration in the Annenberg School for Communication. His research interests include ethnographic methods in media analysis, the impact of mass media on urban life, mediamaking as a form of community-building and proselytizing among religious organizations, globalization and the remaking of ethnic/racial diasporas, visual studies and theories of reality, and racialization and media technology. Before coming to Penn, he taught in the Department of Cultural Anthropology at Duke University and spent three years as a Junior Fellow at the Harvard University Society of Fellows in Cambridge, Massachusetts. As a filmmaker, Jackson has produced a feature-length fiction film, documentaries, and film-shorts that have screened at film festivals internationally. 

Selected Publications

Daniels, Cora and John Jackson. 2014, Forthcoming. Impolite Conversations: On Race, Class, Sex, Religion, and Politics. New York: Atria Books [Simon and Schuster imprint].

Jackson, John. 2013. Thin Description: Ethnography and the African Hebrew Israelites of Jerusalem. Cambridge, Mass: Harvard University Press.

Jackson, John. 2008. Racial Paranoia: The Unintended Consequences of Political Correctness. New York: Basic Civitas.

Jackson, John. 2005. Real Black: Adventures in Racial Sincerity. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Jackson, John. 2001. Harlemworld: Doing Race and Class in Contemporary Black America. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Penn IUR Scholar

Ken Jackson

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Jacques Barzun Professor in History and the Social Sciences, Department of History

Director, Herbert H. Lehman Center for American History, Columbia University

About

Ken Jackson is the Jacques Barzun Professor in History and the Social Sciences in the Department of History and the Director of the Herbert H. Lehman Center for American History at Columbia University. He was formerly the Chair of the Department of History. Jackson’s areas of expertise include urban, social, and military history. He has served as President for several organizations, including the Urban History Association and the Society of American Historians, and is the recipient of many awards, including the Bancroft Prize and the Francis Parkman Prize for his book “Crabgrass Frontier.” His research and work largely focus on the urban history of New York City. Jackson has been affiliated with many organizations, including the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the New York Historical Society, the National Council for History Education, and the Society of American Historians. At Columbia, Jackson teaches the class “The History of New York,” well known for its midnight bike ride from campus to Brooklyn. 

Selected Publications

Jackson, Ken. 1996. All the World's a Mall: Reflections on the Social and Economic Consequences of the American Shopping Center. American Historical Review, October: 1111-1121.

Jackson, Ken. 1998. NCHE: Where School and University Meet. The History Teacher,  February.

Jackson, Ken. 1998. Manila John of Guadacanal: Hero of the Pacific War. In Forgotten Heroes of American History, Susan Ware, ed. New York: Basic Books.

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