People

Penn IUR is affiliated with more than 200 experts in the field of urbanism. Its Faculty Fellows program identifies faculty at the University of Pennsylvania with a demonstrated interest in urban research; the Penn IUR Scholars program identifies urban scholars outside of Penn; and the Penn IUR Fellows program identifies expert urban practitioners. Together, these programs foster a community of scholars and encourage cross-disciplinary collaboration.

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Faculty Fellow

Stefan Al

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Professor of Urban Design, University of Pennsylvania

About

Stefan Al is a Dutch architect, Associate Professor of Urban Design at the University of Pennsylvania, and founder of Stefan Al Architects, a firm dedicated to sustainable design. Al has worked as a practicing architect on renowned projects such as the 600-meter tall Canton Tower in Guangzhou, the preservation of world heritage in Latin America at the World Heritage Center of UNESCO, and an 11,000-acre new eco-friendly city in India. He served as an advisor to the Government of Hong Kong’s Harbourfront Commission and Environment Bureau.

Al’s research focuses on urbanization in developing countries and the evolution of urban form. His articles have been published in the Handbook of Architectural Theory, the Berkeley Planning Journal, Urban China, and other publications. He has edited the books Factory Towns of South China and Villages in the City, and is currently writing a book on Las Vegas called The Strip. Prior to joining Penn, Al has taught at UC Berkeley and the University of Hong Kong, where he was the director of the Urban Design Program. 

Selected Publications

Al, Stefan, ed. 2014. Villages in the City: A Guide to South China’s Informal Settlements. University of Hawaii Press; Hong Kong University Press.

Al, Stefan, ed. 2012. Factory Towns of South China: An Illustrated Guidebook. Hong Kong University Press.

Faculty Fellow

Daniel Barber

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Assistant Professor and Associate Chair

School/Department

Areas of Interest

    About

    Daniel Barber is an Assistant Professor and Associate Chair of Architecture in the School of Design. He is an architectural historian with a research interest in the relationship between the design fields and the emergence of global environmental culture across the twentieth century. His research looks at the role of architectural technologies in the infrastructural and territorial transformations of the immediate post-World War II period in the United States. Barber’s first book, A House in the Sun: Modern Architecture and Solar Energy in the Cold War, will be published by Oxford University Press in 2015. It documents the brief but dynamic interest in solar houses in the 1940s and 50s; he has also published recently on connections between architectural design methods and climate science. He approaches research and teaching from an interdisciplinary perspective, integrating narratives and methods from histories of technology, science, politics, economics, and environmentalism.

    Selected Publications

    Barber, Daniel. 2014. Tomorrow’s House: Solar Housing in 1940s America. In Technology and Culture (forthcoming)

    Barber, Daniel. 2013. “Visualizing Renewable Resources. In Architecture and Energy: Performance and Style,” 164-180, William Braham and Daniel Willis, eds. New York: Routledge.

    Barber, Daniel. 2013. “Experimental Dwellings: Modern Architecture and Environmental Research at the M.I.T. Solar Energy Fund,” 1938-1963. In A Second Modernism: MIT, Architecture, and the “Techno-Social” Moment, 283-316, Arindam Dutta, ed. Cambridge: MIT Press.

    Barber, Daniel. 2013. The World Solar Energy Project, ca. 1954. Grey Room (Quarterly), 51: 64-93.

    Barber, Daniel. 2011. Making Design Environmental. Pidgin Magazine, 10: 246-259.

    Penn IUR Scholar

    Timothy Beatley

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    Teresa Heinz Professor of Sustainable Communities

    Chair, Department of Urban and Environmental Planning, School of Architecture, University of Virginia

    About

    Timothy Beatley is the Teresa Heinz Professor of Sustainable Communities and Chair of the Department of Urban and Environmental Planning in the School of Architecture at the University of Virginia. Beatley’s work focuses on creating sustainable communities and cultivating creative strategies through which cities and towns can reduce their ecological footprints. Beatley is an author of or contributor to more than fifteen books concerning sustainability. 

    Selected Publications

    Beatley, Timothy, David Brower and Anna K. Schwab. 2001. An Introduction to Coastal Zone Management. Washington, DC: Island Press.

    Beatley, Timothy. 2005. Native to Nowhere: Sustaining Home and Community in a Global Age. Washington, DC: Island Press.

    Beatley, Timothy. 1999. Green Urbanism: Learning From European Cities. Washington, DC: Island Press.

    Beatley, Timothy. 2010. Biophilic Cities: Integrating Nature into Urban Design and Planning. Washington, DC: Island Press.

    Beatley, Timothy, Peter Newman and Heather Boyer. 2009. Resilient Cities: Responding to Peak Oil and Climate Change. Washington, DC: Island Press.

    Beatley, Timothy. 1999. Planning for Coastal Resilience: Best Practices for Calamitous Times. Washington, DC: Island Press.

    Faculty Fellow

    Eugénie L. Birch

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    Lawrence C. Nussdorf Professor of Urban Research and Education

    Chair of the Graduate Group in City and Regional Planning

    Co-Director, Penn Institute for Urban Research

    About

    Eugénie L. Birch FAICP, RTPI (hon), is the Nussdorf Professor of Urban Research, Department of City and Regional Planning, School of Design, University of Pennsylvania. She is the founding co-director of the Penn Institute for Urban Research, and co-editor of Penn Press’s The City in the 21st Century series. Dr.Birch’s most recent publications include Slums: How Informal Real Estate Markets Work (2016), co-edited with Susan Wachter and Shohana Chattaraj, Global Urbanization  (2011), co-edited with Susan Wachter, Women’s Health and the World’s Cities  (2011), co-edited with Afaf Meleis and Susan Wachter, and Neighborhoods and Life Chances, How Place Matters (2011) co-edited with Susan Wachter and Harriet Newberger). Dr. Birch has served as editor, Journal of the American Planning Association, chair, Planning Accreditation Board, president, Association of Collegiate Schools of Planning (ACSP), Society for American City and Regional Planning History (SACRPH) and the International Planning History Society (IPHS).  Her awards include: Lawrence C. Gerkens Award in Planning History (SACRPH), Jay Chatterjee Award, Margarita McCoy Award and Distinguished Educator Award (ACSP). Dr. Birch has served as a member of the New York City Planning Commission and of the jury to select the designers for the World Trade Center site. She is currently chair, UN-HABITAT’s World Urban Campaign and president of its special initiative, the General Assembly of Partners toward Habitat III. Dr. Birch, who lives in New York City, holds a PhD and Master in Urban Planning from Columbia University and an A.B. cum laude in History and Latin American Affairs from Bryn Mawr College. 

    Selected Publications

    Books

    Slums, How Informal Real Estate Markets Work  Philadelphia, University of Pennsylvania Press (2016) (edited with Susan Wachter, Shahana Chattaraj).

    Chapters

    “The Institutions of Metropolitan Governance,” in David Gomez Alvarz, Eduardo Moreno and R. Rajack (eds), Steering the Metropolis, Metropolitan Governance for Sustainable Urban Development (Nairobi: UN Habitat, forthcoming).

    “Modeling Interdiciplinarity: Spaces of Modern Paris through Literature and Design,” in Robert T. Talley (ed). Teaching Space, Place and Mapping, Routledge (forthcoming) (with Andrea Goulet).

    “The Imprint of History in the Practice of City and Regional Planning” in C. Hein (ed), Planning History Handbook (New York: Routledge, forthcoming).

    “Metrics and the Impact of the Urban SDG,” in David Simon, et al. (eds), The Urban Planet: Patterns and Pathways to the Cities We Want (forthcoming) with Andrew Rudd, Maruxa Cardama, Aromar Revi.

    Journals

    “Inclusion and Innovation: The Many Forms of Stakeholder Engagement in Habitat III”Citiscape (forthcoming).

    “Implementing the New Urban Agenda in the United States: Building on a Firm Foundation,“ Informationen zur Raumentwicklung (Information on Spatial Development) (forthcoming).

    “Midterm Report: Will Habitat III Make a Difference to Global Urban Development?” Journal of the American Planning Association 84:4 (Fall 2016): 398-411.

    Emerging Scholar

    Catherine Brinkley

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    Ph.D., Regional Planning, University of Pennsylvania

    Veterinary (VMD) student, University of Pennsylvania Veterinary School

    MS in Virology, Gothenburg University, Sweden

    Areas of Interest

      About

      Katie Brinkley completed her Ph.D. in Regional Planning at PennDesign in December 2013 and recently finished her last clinical year in the VMD program at the University of Pennsylvania Veterinary School. Brinkley’s Ph.D. in Regional Planning and Master’s degree in Virology, along with her current work as a Veterinary student, inform her research in ecosystem management; this research concentrates particularly on the prevention of animal-to-human disease and sustainable resource planning. Her research interests include public health, the rural-urban interface, animal agriculture, and food security. Brinkley’s dissertation uses GIS and spatial analytics to explore urban development morphologies as they impact the agricultural sector, regional economies and food distribution. She has worked with the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations to assess food access and waste management in low-income nations and is a former Fulbright Fellow.

      Selected Publications

      Brinkley, C. (2012). "Evaluating the Benefits of Peri-Urban Agriculture." Journal of Planning 

      Literature. 27(3): 259-269.

      Brinkley, C. (2013). "Avenues into Food Planning: a Review of Scholarly Food System Research." International Journal of Planning Studies. 18(2): 243-266.

      Brinkley, Catherine, Eugenie Birch, and Alexander Keating. (2013) "Feeding cities: Charting a research and practice agenda toward food security." Journal of Agriculture, Food Systems and Community Development.

      Brinkley, C. forthcoming. "Decoupled: successful planning policies in countries that have reduced per capita GHG emissions with continued economic growth," Environment and Planning C: Government and Policy.

      Emerging Scholar

      Seung Ah Byun

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      Senior Planner for Water Resources, Brandywine Conservancy’s Municipal Assistance Program

      About

      Seung Ah Byun is the Senior Planner for Water Resources with the Brandywine Conservancy’s Municipal Assistance Program. Her responsibilities involve developing and managing innovative stormwater management practices, green infrastructure tools, and source water protection projects at the watershed and local scales. She also provides technical expertise to municipalities on compliance with state and federal water quality regulations such as MS4 and TMDL requirements. Previously, Seung Ah was a water resources engineer at CDM Smith, primarily consulting for the City of Philadelphia’s Office of Watersheds and CSO Program.  Seung Ah received her doctorate and a master’s degree from the University of Pennsylvania, School of Design’s Department of City and Regional Planning. She also obtained a master’s degree in environmental engineering from Drexel University and a bachelor’s of science in systems engineering from the University of Pennsylvania. Seung Ah is a licensed Professional Engineer and is a LEED Accredited Professional. 

      Selected Publications

      Byun, Seung Ah. James T. Smullen, Mark Maimone, Robert E. Dickinson, and Christopher S. Crockett. (2003) “Overcoming Obstacles for the Application of SWMM to Large-scale Watersheds.” Practical Modeling of Urban Water Systems, Monograph 11. Edited by James, William. CHI, Guelph, Ontario, Canada.

      Faculty Fellow

      Daniel Aldana Cohen

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      Assistant Professor of Sociology, School of Arts and Sciences, University of Pennsylvania

      About

      Daniel Aldana Cohen is Assistant Professor of Sociology at the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Cohen's writing and research are on climate politics. He investigates the intersections of climate change, inequalities of race and social class, and the political projects of both elites and social movements in global cities of the North and South. Cohen's work has been published in Nature, Public Culture, Jacobin, Dissent, Public Books, NACLA Report on the Americas, and elsewhere.

      Fellow

      Brian English

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      Director, Office of Program Innovation, Global Communities (formerly CHF International)

      About

      Brian English is an urban planner that works at the intersections of sustainability, technology and economics.

      Brian is the Director of Program Innovation for Global Communities (formerly CHF International), an international development organization in Washington DC. For the past 10 years, Brian has managed inter-disciplinary teams on urban development projects in Asia, Africa, the Middle East, and the Caribbean. From 2009-2011, Brian was Country Director for CHF International in India and directed a $6 million program called SCALE-UP funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation to reduce urban poverty. After Hurricane Ivan in 2004, Brian managed community revitalization programs in the Eastern Caribbean for the Unites States Agency for International Development. Brian has consulted on a broad range of development projects including special economic zones, innovations clusters, and city master plans.

      Brian’s work has been featured in New York Times, Scientific American, Business Week and Harvard Business Review. Brian was an Aspen Scholar at the 2012 Aspen Ideas Festival and presented at a TEDx on Forces of Change in June, 2012. In 2014, Brian was selected as a Resident Fellow by Rockefeller Foundation at their Bellagio Center in Italy.

      Affiliated PhD Student

      Billy Fleming

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      Doctoral Candidate, City and Regional Planning, University of Pennsylvania

      About

      Billy is a doctoral candidate in City Planning with a background in urban design and policy development. He graduated with a Bachelor of Landscape Architecture from the University of Arkansas where also served as the Student Government President during his final year – the first design student to do so in the University’s 140-year history. Upon graduation, he was presented with the Senior Citation Award, which honors the top undergraduate man and woman across the entire campus. Billy then practiced as a landscape architect in the Middle East, specializing in the development of afforestation strategies in water-scarce environments before returning to graduate school at the University of Texas. While there, he served as a research assistant to Dean Fritz Steiner and was presented with the award for the top master’s thesis within the UT School of Architecture. After graduation, Billy worked in the White House Domestic Policy Council during the first term of President Obama’s Administration and his portfolio included the Sustainable Communities Initiative and the America’s Great Outdoors Initiative (National Parks Service). His dissertation work is focused on the nature of climate change adaptation in coastal cities and it is informed greatly by his work and academic experience.

      Selected Publications

      B. Fleming. 2015. Towards a Megaregional Future: Analysing Progress, Assessing Priorities in the US Megaregion Project. In J. Harrison and M. Hoyler (Eds.), Megaregions: Globalization's New Urban Form?, (pp. 200-229). London: Edward Elgar Publishing.

      B. Fleming. 2015. "Can We Rebuild by Design?"LA+, 1(1): 104-111.

      B. Fleming. 2015. "Book Review: Crisis Cities: Disaster and Redevelopment in New York and New Orleans." Journal of the American Planning Association, 84(2): 158-159.

      B. Fleming. 2015 (in-press). "Double-Book Review: The Resilience Dividend: Being Strong in a World Where Things Go Wrong & The Social Roots of Risk: Producing Disasters, Promoting Resilience." Journal of the American Planning Association, 84(4).

      B. Fleming 2016 (in-press). "Lost in Translation: The Authorship Structure and Argumentation of Resilience." Landscape Journal, 35(1).

      Faculty Fellow

      David Gouverneur

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      Associate Professor of Practice in Landscape Architecture, School of Design, University of Pennsylvania

      About

      David Gouverneur is Associate Professor of Practice in Landscape Architecture at the School of Design and Honorary Professor of the Universidad Rafael Urdaneta, Maracaibo, Venezuela. Previously, he was the Chair of the School of Architecture and Professor in the Departments of Architecture, and City and Regional Planning at Universidad Simón Bolívar; Director of Urban Development of Venezuela; Co-founder and Professor of the Urban Design program, and Director of the Mayor's Institute in Urban Design at Universidad Metropolitana, in Caracas. He is the two-time recipient of the G. Holmes Perkins Award for distinguished teaching at PennDesign and co-recipient of the Venezuelan National Architecture award in 2000 and in 2016. His professional practice focuses on improvement of existing informal settlements, the rehabilitation of areas affected by extraordinary natural events, areas of new centralities, new mixed-use districts, and the rehabilitation of cultural landscapes. His main area of research focuses on the notion of Informal Armatures, a method to address the rampant Self-Constructed urbanization, the dominant urban form in many countries of the Global South. He has lectured extensively, written articles and organized seminars and workshops, particularly in Latin America. He received his M.Arch in Urban Design from Harvard University (1980), and B.Arch from the Universidad Simón Bolívar in Caracas, Venezuela (1977). 

      Selected Publications

      Planning and Design for Future Informal Settlements: Shaping the Self-Constructed City. Routledge 2014.

      El diseño de nuevos asentamientos informales. Universidad de La Salle/Universidad Eafit, Colombia, 2016

      Editor of Revisiting Urban Renewal: Alternatives for Public Housing in Las Palmas de Gran Canaria. PennDesign/Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, 2012

      Co author of: The Rehabilitation of the Littoral Central, Venezuela, with the support of Universidad Metropolitana/Harvard University,Toddman Editores, Caracas, 2000.

       

      Emerging Scholar

      Albert T. Han

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      Faculty of Environmental Design, University of Calgary

      About

      Albert Tonghoon Han is currently a postdoctoral research fellow with the University of Calgary’s Faculty of Environmental Design. His research focuses on studying how growth management, land use planning, and environmental policies affect the natural environment in metropolitan areas in the North America and other fast-growing cities around the world. He is also interested in studying how planning efforts based on market-based approaches can mitigate the impacts of climate change, particularly in regards to improving building energy efficiency in cities. Albert received his Ph.D. in City and Regional Planning from University of Pennsylvania in 2015. Prior to Penn, he worked on various global environmental projects at the Korea Environment Institute from 2011 to 2012. He obtained his master's degree in Urban and Regional Planning from the University of Iowa in 2011 with specialization in environmental planning and spatial analysis. His devotion to studying land use and environmental planning originated from his background in Life Science and Biotechnology from Korea University where he received his bachelor's degree in 2009.

      Affiliated PhD Student

      Sa Min Han

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      Doctoral Student, City and Regional Planning, University of Pennslyvania

      About

      Sa Min Han is a doctoral student in the Department of City and Regional Planning at the University of Pennsylvania. She has a BA degree in Landscape Architecture from the Seoul National University and a Master of Landscape Architecture degree from the University of Pennsylvania. Prior to her arrival, she worked as a certificated landscape architect and urban planner at Samsung C&T in Korea for 8 years. She also interned at AECOM in Hong Kong. Ms. Han’s research interest lies in resilient and sustainable planning. She eagerly hopes to study mapping process related to vulnerability indexes and regional assessment, for use when engaging in site prioritization and preparations for natural hazards caused by climate change. Her goal is to support policymakers, planners, and urban designers hoping to better understand how coastal cities should respond to natural hazards caused by climate change and to help them to establish appropriate policies for mitigation and adaptation.

      Selected Publications

      Korea Water Resources Corporation. “Application and Management Plans for the Flood Control Plains in Korea” (2007)

      PennDesign Urban Planning Studio. “Alternative Futures for the New Jersey Shore: Climate Change Adaptation & Natural Hazard Mitigation Strategies”, IFLA World Congress (2014)

      11st ULI / Gerald D. Hines Student Urban Design Competition, honorable mention (2013)

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