People

Penn IUR is affiliated with more than 200 experts in the field of urbanism. Its Faculty Fellows program identifies faculty at the University of Pennsylvania with a demonstrated interest in urban research; the Penn IUR Scholars program identifies urban scholars outside of Penn; and the Penn IUR Fellows program identifies expert urban practitioners. Together, these programs foster a community of scholars and encourage cross-disciplinary collaboration.

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Penn IUR Scholar

Alain Bertaud

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Senior Research Scholar at the NYU Stern Urbanization Project

About

Alain Bertaud is a senior research scholar at the NYU Stern Urbanization Project.  His main area of research is the impact of markets, transportation, and regulations on urban form.  At the moment, he is writing a book about urban planning that is tentatively titled Order Without Design. Bertaud previously held the position of principal urban planner at the World Bank, where he worked on urban policy and urban infrastructure development in India, in transition economies such as China, Russia, and countries of Eastern Europe.  After retiring from the Bank in 1999, he worked as an independent consultant.  Prior to joining the World Bank he worked as a resident urban planner in a number of cities around the world: Bangkok, San Salvador (El Salvador), Port au Prince (Haiti), Sana’a (Yemen), New York, Paris, Tlemcen (Algeria), and Chandigarh (India).

Bertaud’s research, conducted in collaboration with his wife Marie-Agnès, aims to bridge the gap between operational urban planning and urban economics.  Their work focuses primarily on the interaction between urban forms, real estate markets and regulations. Bertaud’s publications can be downloaded from: http://alainbertaud.com.

Selected Publications

Bertaud, Alain and Brueckner, Jan K. 2005. Analyzing building-height restrictions: predicted impacts and welfare costs. Regional Science and Urban Economics, 35: 109-125.

Bertaud, Alain. 2003. Clearing the air in Atlanta: transit and smart growth or conventional economics? Journal of Urban Economics, 54: 379–400.

Bertaud, Alain. 2010. Land Markets, Government Interventions and Housing Affordability. Wolfensohn Center for Development Working Paper 18.

Bertaud, Alain and Malpezzi, Stephen. 2001. Measuring the Costs and Benefits of Urban Land Use Regulation: A Simple Model with an Application to Malaysia. Journal of Housing Economics,10: 393–418.

Penn IUR Scholar

Robert Cervero

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Friesen Chair of Urban Studies, Professor of City and Regional Planning, College of Environmental Design, University of California – Berkeley

About

Robert Cervero is Friesen Chair of Urban Studies and Professor of City and Regional Planning in the College of Environmental Design at the University of California – Berkeley. He is also the Director of both the Institute of Urban and Regional Development and the University of California Transportation Center. Cervero’s research and teaching focus on transportation planning, transportation and land use, infrastructure planning, and international development. His research on transportation focuses on how new urban developments and transformations impact travel behavior. In 2004, Cervero was the first-ever recipient of the Dale Prize for Excellence in Urban Planning Research. He has won the Article of The Year award for two separate articles from the Journal of the American Planning Association.

Selected Publications

Cervero, Robert. 1998 (1st ed). The Transit Metropolis: A Global Inquiry. Washington, DC: Island Press.

Ewing, Reid and Robert Cervero. 2010. Travel and the Built Environment: A Meta-Analysis. Journal of the American Planning Association, 76(3): 265-294.

Cervero, Robert. 2013 (reprint edition). Suburban Gridlock. New Brunswick, NJ: Center for Urban Policy Research.

Cervero, Robert. 1997. Paratransit in America: Redefining Mass Transportation. New York: Prager.

Emerging Scholar

Mengke Chen

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Doctoral Candidate in City and Regional Planning, University of Pennsylvania

About

Mengke Chen recently received her PhD in City and Regional Planning at PennDesign. Her research interests include economic development, transportation investment (high-speed rail investment), and transportation and land use. Chen is particularly interested with regards to the impact of high speed rail development on urban economics in Chinese cities, as well as in Europe. The profound societal and economic impact of high-speed rail in contemporary society also constitutes a chief focus of her research. Chen received her Master’s in Urban Spatial Analytics from the University of Pennsylvania and her B.S. and G.I.S. from Peking University in Beijing, China.

Selected Publications

Chen, Mengke and Matthias N. Sweet. “Does regional travel time unreliability influence mode 

choice?” Transportation. Springer Science+Business Media, LLC. 2011.

Affiliated PhD Student

Xiaoxia Dong

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PhD Candidate, City and Regional Planning, University of Pennslyvania

About

Xiaoxia Dong is a doctoral student in the Department of City and Regional Planning at PennDesign. His research interest lies in transportation and infrastructure planning. In particular, he is eager to explore how the potential of new transportation technologies and services such as driverless cars and ride-hailing can be maximized to create accessible and sustainable urban environment. Having witnessed the success and failure of many of these emerging technologies and services in China, he also hopes to incorporate an international perspective into his research. His goal is to enable policy makers to make informed decisions when facilitating urban development with respect to new transportation technologies and services. Xiaoxia has a BA degree in Urban Planning from the University of Utah and a Master of City Planning degree from the University of Pennsylvania. He worked as a transportation planner at Fehr and Peers where he participated in multimodal planning, traffic impact studies, master planning, and statistical analyses. He also interned at the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) in Beijing after college where he learned the current sustainability related policies and practices in China.

Selected Publications

Dong, Xiaoxia. 2014 “A High Speed Future.” Panorama. University of Pennsylvania, School of Design.

Dong, Xiaoxia. 2011 “Wisdom of the Businessmen of Chicago” (In Chinese). Peking University Business Review. Peking University.

Faculty Fellow

Erick Guerra

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Assistant Professor of City and Regional Planning, School of Design, University of Pennsylvania

About

Erick Guerra, Ph.D., is an Assistant Professor in City and Regional Planning at University of Pennsylvania, where he teaches courses in transportation planning and quantitative planning methods. He has published recent articles on suburban transit investments in Mexico City, self-reported happiness and travel behavior, the relationship between land use and car-ownership and driving rates, and the role of land use in promoting high ridership and cost-effective transit service. His current work focuses on land use and transportation in Mexico City and Indonesia, public transport policy, land use and traffic safety, and contemporary planning for self-driving vehicles. As a practicing researcher and consultant, Erick has worked on a diverse range of planning-related topics, including housing investment and financial remittances in Sub-Saharan Africa; informal transportation in medium-sized Indonesian cities; and cross-border planning on the Island of Ireland. Erick holds a Ph.D. in City and Regional Planning from the University of California Berkeley, a Master’s in Urban Planning from Harvard University, and a BA in Fine Arts and French from the University of Pennsylvania. He served as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Gabon from 2002 to 2004.

 

Selected Publications

Guerra, Erick (2015). Planning for Cars that Drive Themselves. Journal of Planning Education and Research, doi: 10.1177/0739456X15613591.

Morris, Eric and Erick Guerra (2015). Are we there yet? Trip duration and mood during travel. Transportation Research Part F: Traffic Psychology and Behaviour 33, pp. 38–47.

Guerra, Erick (2015). Has Mexico City’s Shift to Commercially Produced Housing Increased Car Ownership and Car Use? Journal of Transport and Land Use 8 (2), pp. 171–89.

Guerra, Erick (2015). The Geography of Car Ownership in Mexico City: A Joint Model of Households’ Residential Location and Car Ownership Decisions. Journal of Transport Geography, Vol. 43 (1), pp. 171–80.

Guerra, Erick (2014). The Built Environment and Car Use in Mexico City: Is the Relationship Changing over Time? Journal of Planning Education and Research, Vol. 34 (4), pp. 394-408.

Fellow

Andrew F. Haughwout

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Senior Vice President and Function Head, Microeconomic Studies Function, Federal Reserve Bank of New York

Areas of Interest

    About

    Andy F. Haughwout is a Senior Vice President and Function Head of the Microeconomic Studies Function at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York. He is the Group's Senior Administrative Officer and a co-editor of the Liberty Street Economics blog. In addition to his duties at the Bank, he serves on a Transportation Research Board panel investigating the value of transportation spending as economic stimulus. He is a past Chair of the North American Regional Science Council and the Federal Reserve System Committee on Regional Analysis and serves on the Advisory Board of the Journal of Regional Science. Prior to joining the New York Fed, Haughwout served as Assistant Professor at Princeton University. 

    Faculty Fellow

    Vijay Kumar

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    Nemirovsky Family Dean of Penn Engineering, School of Engineering, University of Pennsylvania

    About

    Vijay Kumar is the Nemirovsky Family Dean of Penn Engineering with appointments in the Departments of Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics, Computer and Information Science, and Electrical and Systems Engineering at the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Kumar received his Bachelor of Technology degree from the Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur and his Ph.D. from The Ohio State University in 1987. He has been on the Faculty in the Department of Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics with a secondary appointment in the Department of Computer and Information Science at the University of Pennsylvania since 1987. Dr. Kumar served as the Deputy Dean for Research in the School of Engineering and Applied Science from 2000-2004. He directed the GRASP Laboratory, a multidisciplinary robotics and perception laboratory, from 1998-2004. He was the Chairman of the Department of Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics from 2005-2008. He served as the Deputy Dean for Education in the  School of Engineering and Applied Science from 2008-2012. He then served as the assistant director of robotics and cyber physical systems at the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (2012 – 2013). Dr. Kumar is a Fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (2003), a Fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers(2005) and a member of the National Academy of Engineering (2013). Dr. Kumar’s research interests are in robotics, specifically multi-robot systems, and micro aerial vehicles. He has served on the editorial boards of the IEEE Transactions on Robotics and Automation, IEEE Transactions on Automation Science and Engineering, ASME Journal of Mechanical Design, the ASME Journal of Mechanisms and Robotics and the Springer Tract in Advanced Robotics (STAR). He currently serves as Editor of the ASME Journal of Mechanisms and Robotics and as Advisory Board Member of the AAAS Science Robotics Journal. He is the recipient of the 1991 National Science Foundation Presidential Young Investigator award, the 1996 Lindback Award for Distinguished Teaching (University of Pennsylvania), the 1997 Freudenstein Award for significant accomplishments in mechanisms and robotics, the 2012 ASME Mechanisms and Robotics Award, the 2012 IEEE Robotics and Automation Society Distinguished Service Award, a 2012 World Technology Network (wtn.net) award, a 2014 Engelberger Robotics Award and the 2017 IEEE Robotics and Automation Society George Saridis Leadership Award in Robotics and Automation.  He has won best paper awards at DARS 2002, ICRA 2004, ICRA 2011, RSS 2011, and RSS 2013, and has advised doctoral students who have won Best Student Paper Awards at ICRA 2008, RSS 2009, and DARS 2010.

    Selected Publications

    Ehsani and Das, “Yield estimation in citrus with SUAVs,” Citrus Extension Trade Journals, pp. 16-18, 2016. 

    Concha, Loianno, Kumar, and Civera, “Visual-inertial direct SLAM,” in 2016 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA), 2016, pp. 1331-1338. 

    Wong, Steager, and Kumar, “Independent Control of Identical Magnetic Robots in a Plane,” IEEE Robotics and Automation Letters, vol. 1, iss. 1, pp. 554-561, 2016. 

    Hunter, Chodosh, Steager, and Kumar, “Control of microstructures propelled via bacterial baths,” in 2016 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA), 2016, pp. 1693-1700. 

    Kessens, Thomas, Desai, and Kumar, “Versatile Aerial Grasping Using Self-Sealing Suction,” in IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, Stockholm, 2016. 
     

    Emerging Scholar

    Simon Mosbah

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    Consultant, U.S. Advisory Services Group, WSP Parsons Brinkerhoff

    About

    Simon Mosbah is an incoming Consultant with WSP Parsons Brinkerhoff in Washington D.C., in the U.S. Advisory Services Group, focusing on transit project development and finance. He holds a Ph.D. in City and Regional Planning from the University of Pennsylvania. His dissertation focused on airports, airport expansions and employment in U.S. metropolitan areas. He published an article on the topic of airports and economic development in the Journal of Planning Literature, with Dr. Megan Ryerson: “Can US Metropolitan Areas Use Large Commercial Airports as Tools to Bolster Regional Economic Growth?”. He worked on the Sustainable Communities Indicators Catalog, a project between the Penn Institute for Urban Research and the Partnership for Sustainable Communities (U.S. Department of Transportation, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and U.S. Department for Housing and Urban Development) between 2013 and 2015, with Dr. Eugenie Birch as PI and funding by the Ford Foundation. He was specifically responsible for the selection and definition of transportation indicators for the catalog. Originally from France, Simon is a graduate of the Sorbonne (majoring in Classics, with minors in History and Linguistics), and the Ecole Normale Superieure; he holds an MBA from ESSEC Business School (majoring in Corporate Finance and Diversity Management). He previously worked as a business strategy consultant in France, specializing in rail transportation, and taught French at Amherst College (Massachusetts).

    Selected Publications

    Mosbah, S. 2013 “Rethinking transit projects in high-income neighborhoods.” Panorama. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania, School of Design.

    Fellow

    Enrique Peñalosa

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    Former Mayor of Bogota, Columbia; President, Institute for Transportation and Development Policy (ITDP)

    About

    Enrique Peñalosa was Mayor of Bogota, Colombia from 1998-2001, and is currently President of the Institute for Transportation and Development Policy (ITDP). As Mayor, Peñalosa profoundly transformed Bogota, implementing an environmentally and socially sustainable model for the city that prioritized public transportation, public pedestrian spaces, and the welfare of the city’s children. He is credited with creating TransMilenio, one of the world’s best bus transit systems. His many other initiatives included: a network of bicycle paths, slum improvement projects, daily car use restrictions during peak hours and an annual Car Free Day, new parks and libraries, and a land bank to provide low income housing. Penalosa’s advisory work concentrates on sustainability, mobility, equity, public space and quality of life, and the organizational and leadership requirements to turn ideas into projects and realities.  His ideas and innovations have been featured in many international publications, and he has won a number of awards including the 2009 Göteborg Award for Sustainable Development, the Eisenhower Fellowship, and the Simon Bolivar National Prize for Journalism, among others. Peñalosa has published numerous articles in newspapers and magazines as well as two books.

    Selected Publications

    Penalosa, Enrique. 1990. Democracy and Capitalism: Challenges of the Coming Century. Fundación hacia el Desarrollo.

    Penalosa, Enrique. 1989. Capitalism: The Best Option. Fundación hacia el Desarrollo.

    Fellow

    Michael Replogle

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    Managing Director for Policy and Founder, Institute for Transportation & Development Policy

    About

    Michael Replogle is Managing Director for Policy and Founder of the Institute for Transportation & Development Policy (IDTP), a nonprofit organization that promotes environmentally sustainable and equitable transportation projects and policies worldwide.  Serving from 1983-1992 as transportation coordinator for the Maryland-National Capital Parks and Planning Commission, he co-founded Bikes Not Bombs and ITDP in 1984-1985, and served as ITDP’s President for all but a few years between 1985-2009. Replogle served as Transportation Director at the Environmental Defense Fund, from 1992-2009, testifying frequently before the U.S. Congress, shaping federal transportation and environmental regulations, and working with metropolitan planning organizations and civil society groups to guide local and regional transportation and air quality planning and project development. He is a member of the U.S. Advisory Committee on Transportation Statistics and an emeritus member of the Transportation Research Board Committee on Transportation in Developing Countries, which he helped found. He is author of several hundred articles and papers.

    Selected Publications

    Replogle, Michael and Colin Hughes. 2012. “Moving Towards Sustainable Transport.” In State of the World 2012: Moving Towards Sustainable Prosperity. Washington DC: Island Press.

    Replogle, Michael, Annie Weinstock, Walter Hook, and Ramon Cruz. 2011. Recapturing Global Leadership in Bus Rapid Transit. New York: Institute for Transportation & Development Policy.

    Creutzig, Felix, Maximilian Theis, Jiang Ping Zhou, and Michael Replogle. 2011. “Trapped in Tremendous Congestion: Can Beijing Find a Road towards Harmonious and Sustainable Transport?” Urban Transport of China, 9(4).

    Replogle, Michael and Keri Funderburg. 2006. No More Just Throwing Money Out the Window: Using Road Tolls to Cut Congestion, Protect the Environment, and Boost Access for All. New York: Environmental Defense Fund.

    Replogle, Michael. 1990. Non-Motorized Vehicles in Asian Cities (prepared as part of the World Bank Asia Urban Transport Sector Study).

    Replogle, Michael. 1987. Sustainable Transportation Strategies for Third World Development. Paper prepared for presentation to Conference Session on Human-Powered Transportation and Transportation Planning for Developing Countries, Washington, DC: 67th Annual Meeting (1988) of the Transportation Research Board.

    Faculty Fellow

    Megan Ryerson

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    Assistant Professor of City and Regional Planning and Electrical and Systems Engineering; University of Pennsylvania

    About

    Dr. Megan S. Ryerson is an Assistant Professor of City and Regional Planning and Electrical and Systems Engineering in the area of Transportation at the University of Pennsylvania. She received her Ph.D. in Civil and Environmental Engineering from the University of California, Berkeley in 2010 and her B.Sc. in Systems Engineering from the University of Pennsylvania in 2003. Her research focuses on the tradeoff between economic development and environmental impacts presented by the air transportation system and the design of resilient multimodal transportation system networks. Professor Ryerson has published 16 articles and co-authored numerous studies investigating the costs and environmental impacts of municipally-funded airline subsidy programs, the environmental impact of airline contingency fueling practices, optimizing aircraft diversions in a climate-impacted future, estimating the spatial differences in human health impacts of aircraft across the U.S., and comparing the environmental impact of aviation and High Speed Rail Systems. Dr. Ryerson serves as the major research advisor for Ph.D., Master’s, and undergraduate students and she teaches courses on Intercity Transportation Systems, Advanced Methods for Transportation Systems Analysis, and Logistics and Highway Design. Her students have won multiple competitive awards and are employed by organizations including Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, AECOM, and American Airlines. Dr. Ryerson serves on the board of the Women’s Transportation Seminar Philadelphia Chapter Transportation YOU Program, the Program Committee for the International Conference on Research in Air Transportation, the INFORMS Transportation Science and Logistics Dissertation Prize Committee, and in 2015 she was appointed by the Secretary of Transportation to serve on the Airport Cooperative Research Program Oversight Committee. 
     

    Selected Publications

    Ryerson, M.S., Woodburn, A. (2014). Build Capacity or Manage Demand: Can regional planners lead American aviation into a new frontier of demand management? Journal of the American Planning Association (JAPA), 80(2), 138-152.

    Ryerson, M.S., Ge, X. (2014). The Role of Turboprops in China's Growing Aviation System. Journal of Transport Geography, 40, 133–144.

    Woodburn, A., Ryerson, M. (2014). Airport Capacity Enhancement and Flight Predictability. Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board, No. 2400, 87-97.

    Ryerson, M.S., Kim, H. (2014). The Impact of Airline Mergers and Hub Reorganization on Aviation Fuel Consumption. Journal of Cleaner Production, 85, 395–407.

    Megan S. Ryerson Page 2 of 10 Updated: August 2015 11 Ryerson, M.S., Hansen, M. (2013). Capturing the Impact of Fuel Price on Jet Aircraft Operating Costs with Engineering and Econometric Models. Transport. Res. Part C: Emerging Technologies, 33, 282–296.

    Affiliated PhD Student

    Wichinpong “Park” Sinchaisri

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    PhD Candidate in Operations, Information, and Decisions, School of Management, The Wharton School

    About

    Park Sinchaisri is a doctoral student in Operations, Information, and Decisions at The Wharton School. His primary areas of research are behavioral operations management, urban/social operations research, and revenue management. He is particularly interested in applying mathematical optimization and behavioral science to design better systems, from transportation to education, and from healthcare to online marketplaces, for both service providers and customers. Park received his undergraduate degree in Computer Engineering and Applied Mathematics-Economics from Brown University in 2012 and later earned his master’s degree in Computation for Design and Optimization from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in 2016. Prior to joining Wharton, he was a software engineer at Oracle, a strats analyst at Goldman Sachs, and a data scientist at Deloitte Consulting.

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