People

Penn IUR is affiliated with more than 200 experts in the field of urbanism. Its Faculty Fellows program identifies faculty at the University of Pennsylvania with a demonstrated interest in urban research; the Penn IUR Scholars program identifies urban scholars outside of Penn; and the Penn IUR Fellows program identifies expert urban practitioners. Together, these programs foster a community of scholars and encourage cross-disciplinary collaboration.

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Sydney Baloue

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PhD Candidate, Africana Studies, School of Arts & Sciences, University of Pennyslvania

About

Sydney Baloue is a William Fontaine Fellow of Africana Studies at the University of Pennsylvania. His research explores Black dance and music subcultures and Black queer geographies within urban landscapes. He has a particular focus on the usage of oral histories to document genealogies of Black and Latinx LGBT communities in New York City and in Europe, which constitute ball/house culture and voguing. His research methods include oral histories, performance ethnography, data analysis and international/regional comparative research. Prior to entering graduate school at Penn, Sydney was awarded a German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD) Study Scholarship in 2011. He was a Transatlantic Fellow at Ecologic Institute in Berlin from 2012 to 2014. Sydney holds a dual-degree MSc/MA in Urban Policy from the London School of Economics and the Paris Institute of Political Studies (Sciences Po). He graduated magna cum laude with a BA in Political Science and French & Francophone Studies from the University of Pennsylvania in 2011.

Selected Publications

Sydney Baloue, (2016) Black and Latin@ Queer Geographies and Oral Histories of Ballroom Culture in New York City. (London, UK: Masters Thesis, London School of Economics and Politics, 2016).

Haut Conseil d’Egalité Entre Femmes et Hommes – Premier Ministre, (2015) Avis sur le harcèlement sexiste et les violences sexuelles dans les transports en commun. – Report for French Prime Minister’s Office No. 2015-04-16-VIO-16 (Paris, France: Haut Conseil d’Egalité Entre Femmes et Hommes, 2015)

Sydney Baloue and Cecile Moore, Think Tanks in a Time of Crisis and Paralysis: On the Sidelines or Catalysts for Ideas and Actions? (Philadelphia, PA: Think Tanks and Civil Societies Program, 2013).

Ecologic Institute, E.On, Policy Studies Institute (2013): Consumer preferences for smart homes: a comparative study between the United Kingdom, Germany and Italy. – Report for E.On under E.On International Research Initiative 2012.

Faculty Fellow

Carolyn Cannuscio

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Assistant Professor of Family Medicine and Community Health

About

Carolyn Cannuscio is Assistant Professor of Family Medicine and Community Health at the Perelman School of Medicine.  She is a social epidemiologist with substantial experience studying aging, chronic disease, and health disparities.  Her work focuses on the material and social causes of later-life health disparities, and the preventable causes of urban health disparities. In addition, Cannuscio advances the use of visual methods in health disparities research, collaborating with a strong interdisciplinary team of researchers and student research assistants to this end. She is a Senior Fellow with Penn’s Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics, an affiliated faculty member with Penn’s Master of Public Health Program, Senior Fellow with Penn’s Center for Public Health Initiatives, and a Health Science Specialist with the Philadelphia VA Medical Center. 

Selected Publications

Cannuscio, C., E. Bugos, S. Hersh, D. Asch, E. Weiss.  2012. Using Art to Amplify Youth Voices on Housing Insecurity. American Journal of Public Health, 102 (1): 10-12.

Cannuscio, C., E. Weiss, and D, Asch.  2010. Urban Foodways: Multiple Paths to Health and Illness.”  Journal of Urban Health, 87(3): 381–393

Cannuscio, C., E. Weiss, J. P. Schroeder, H. Fruchtman, J. Weiner, and D. Asch.  2009. Visual Epidemiology: Photographs as Tools for Probing Street-level Etiologies. Social Science and Medicine, 69(4).

Faculty Fellow

Camille Z. Charles

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Professor of Sociology; Edmund J. and Louise W. Kahn Term Professor in the Social Sciences

Chair, Department of Africana Studies

About

Camille Charles is Professor of Sociology, Edmund J. and Louise W. Kahn Term Professor in the Social Sciences, and Chair of the Department of Africana Studies in the Department of Sociology in the School of Arts and Sciences. Her research interests are in the areas of urban inequality, racial attitudes and intergroup relations, racial residential segregation, minorities in higher education, and racial identity.  Her work has appeared in Social Forces, Social Problems, Social Science Research, The DuBois Review, the American Journal of Education, the Annual Review of Sociology, the Chronicle of Higher Education, and The Root.

Selected Publications

Charles, Camille Z., Douglas S. Massey, Mary J. Fischer, and Margarita Mooney, with Brooke A. Cunningham, and Gniesha Y. Dinwiddie. 2009. Taming the River: Negotiating the Academic, Financial and Social Currents in Selective Colleges and Universities. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.

Bobo, Lawrence D. and Camille Z. Charles. 2008. Race in the American Mind: From the Moynihan Report to the Obama Candidacy. The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Sciences 621: 243-259. Charles, Camille Zubrinsky. 2007. Comfort Zones: Immigration, Acculturation, and the Neighborhood Racial Composition Preferences of Latinos and Asians. Du Bois Review: Social Science Research on Race 4(1): 41-77.

Charles, Camille Z., Kimberly C. Torres, and Rachelle J. Brunn. 2007. Black Like Who? Exploring the Racial, Ethnic, and Class Diversity of Black Students at Selective Colleges and Universities. In Racism in Post-Race America: New 4 Theories, New Directions, Charles A. Gallagher, ed. Chapel Hill, NC: Social Forces, 247-266.

Charles, Camille Zubrinsky. 2006. Won’t You Be My Neighbor? Race, Class and Residence in Los Angeles. New York: Russell Sage. 

Penn IUR Scholar

Carolyn Chernoff

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Visiting Assistant Professor of Sociology, Skidmore College

About

Carolyn Chernoff is a Visiting Assistant Professor of Sociology at Skidmore College. She is an urban and cultural sociologist specializing in the role of culture in reproducing and transforming urban inequality. While a doctoral student at the University of Pennsylvania, Chernoff received the 2013 Arnold Award for Outstanding Contribution by a Doctoral Student from the Graduate School of Education, the Dean's Scholarship (GSE), and served as a 2012-2013 Graduate Fellow for Teaching Excellence at Penn's Center for Teaching and Learning. Chernoff’s work focuses on cities, arts, and social change, particularly on the level of social interaction and the production of community. Her dissertation, “Imagining the City: Ritual and Conflict in the Urban Art Democracy,” is based on ethnographic research conducted over a period of eight years at three different community-arts organizations in a major Mid-Atlantic city. 

Selected Publications

Chernoff, Carolyn. 2013, forthcoming. Spelling It Out: Difference and Diversity in Public Conversation. Michigan Sociological Review, 27.

Chernoff, Carolyn. 2013. “Conflict Theory in Education.” In Sociology of Education, James Ainsworth and Geoffrey J. Golson, eds. Sage Publications.

Chernoff, Carolyn. 2013. “Waldorf Education.” In Sociology of Education, James Ainsworth and Geoffrey J. Golson, eds. Sage Publications.

Chernoff, Carolyn. 2010. Objectifying Measures: The Dominance of High-Stakes Testing and the Politics of Schooling – By Amanda Walker Johnson. Anthropology & Education Quarterly, 41: 212–213.

Chernoff, Carolyn.  2009. On Culture, Art, and Experience. Perspectives on Urban Education (Penn GSE electronic journal), 6(2): 77-78.

Faculty Fellow

Dennis Culhane

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Professor and Dana and Andrew Stone Chair in Social Policy

About

Dennis Culhane is Professor and Dana and Andrew Stone Chair in Social Policy, School of Social Policy and Practice. His primary area of research is homelessness and assisted housing policy. His research has contributed to efforts to address the housing and support needs of people experiencing housing emergencies and long-term homelessness. Culhane’s recent research includes studies of vulnerable youth and young adults, including those transitioning from foster care, juvenile justice, and residential treatment services. Culhane is the Director of Research for the National Center on Homelessness among Veterans at the United States Department of Veterans Affairs. Culhane co-directs the Intelligence for Social Policy initiative (ISP), a MacArthur-funded project to promote the development of integrated database systems by states and localities for policy analysis and systems reform.

Selected Publications

Byrne, Thomas, Stephen Metraux, Manuel Moreno, Dennis Culhane, Halil Toros, and Max Stevens. 2012. Los Angeles County’s Enterprise Linkages Project: An Example of the Use of Integrated Data Systems in Making Data-Driven Policy and Program Decisions. California Journal of Politics and Policy 4.

Alvaro Cortes, Josh Leopold, Louise Rothschild, Larry Buron, Jill Khadduri, and Dennis Culhane. 2011. The 2010 Annual Homeless Assessment Report to Congress. The Selected Works of Dennis P. Culhane. Available at: http://works.bepress.com/dennis_culhane/105.

Culhane, Dennis P. and Stephen Metraux. 2008. Rearranging the Deck Chairs or Reallocating the Lifeboats?: Homelessness Assistance and Its Alternatives. Journal of the American Planning Association 74(1): 111-121.

Culhane, Dennis P. 2008. The Cost of Homelessness: A Perspective from the United States, European Journal of Homelessness. European Journal of Homelessness 2(1): 97-114.

Penn IUR Scholar

Rebecca Diamond

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Assistant Professor of Economics, Stanford Graduate School of Business

About

Rebecca Diamond is an Assistant Professor of Economics at the Stanford Graduate School of Business. She is an applied micro economist studying local labor and housing markets. Her recent research focuses on the causes and consequences of diverging economic growth across U.S. cities and its effects on inequality. She was a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research from 2013 to 2014. 

Selected Publications

Diamond, Rebecca, Thomas Barrios, Guido W. Imbens, and Michal Kolesár. 2012. Clustering, Spatial Correlations, and Randomization Inference. Journal of the American Statistical Association 107(498): 578-591.

Diamond, Rebecca. 2013. The Determinants and Welfare Implications of U.S. Workers’ Diverging Location Choices by Skill: 1980-2000 (working paper).

Diamond, Rebecca. 2014. Housing Supply Elasticity and Rent Extraction by State and Local Governments (working paper).

Faculty Fellow

John DiIulio

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Frederic Fox Leadership Professor of Politics, Religion and Civil Society

Faculty Director & Co-Chair of the Director's Advisory Group, Robert A. Fox Leadership Program

About

John DiIulio is the Frederic Fox Leadership Professor of Politics, Religion and Civil Society in the Department of Political Science and Directs Penn's Fox Leadership Program for undergraduates, as well as its religion research program. Over the last quarter-century, he has won several major academic and teaching awards including the 2010 Ira Abrams Memorial Award and the 2010 Lindback Award for Distinguished Teaching.  He has also chaired his academic association's standing committee on professional ethics. Outside academic life, he has developed programs to mentor the children of prisoners, provide literacy training in low-income communities, reduce homicides in high-crime police districts, and support inner-city Catholic schools that serve low-income children. He has been a research center director at the Brookings Institution, the Manhattan Institute, and Public/Private Ventures. During his academic leave in 2001-2002, he served as first Director of the White House Office of Faith-Based and Community Initiatives. He is the author, co-author, and editor of over a dozen books and several hundred articles.

Selected Publications

Wilson, James Q. and John DiIulio. 2013. American Government: Institutions and Policies (13th edition). Cengage Learning.

DiIulio, John. 2009. Mayberry Machiavellis After All?: Why Judging George W. Bush Is Never as Easy as It Seems. In Judging Bush, Robert Taranto et al., eds. Stanford University Press.

DiIulio, John. 2009. More Religion, Less Crime?: Science, Felonies, and the Three Faith Factors. Annual Review of Law and Social Science, 5.

DiIulio, John. 2007. Godly Republic: A Centrist Blueprint for America’s Faith-Based Future. University of California Press.

Faculty Fellow

Vivian Gadsden

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William T. Carter Professor of Child Development and Education; Director, National Center on Fathers and Families

Associate Director, National Center on Adult Literacy

School/Department

Areas of Interest

    About

    Vivian Gadsden is the William T. Carter Professor of Child Development and Education, Director of the National Center on Fathers and Families, and Associate Director of the National Center on Adult Literacy at the Graduate School of Education. Her research interests focus on cultural and social factors affecting learning and literacy across the life-course and within families, particularly those at the greatest risk for academic and social vulnerability and her writing focuses on intergenerational learning. Her current projects include a longitudinal study on intergenerational learning within African-American and Latino families; a study of parent engagement in children’s early literacy; a study with young fathers in urban settings; a study on literacy, education, and health; a policy study on incarcerated parents and their families; and a study of children of incarcerated parents. She is participating in an NICHD-funded project (Dr. John Fantuzzo, principal investigator) on the development of an integrated Head Start curriculum.

    Selected Publications

    Gadsden, V. L. and P. Genty, eds. Forthcoming. Incarcerated Parents and Their Children. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.

    Wortham, S. and V.L. Gadsden. 2009. The Complexities of “Similarity” in Research Interviewing. In Investigating Classroom Interaction: Methodologies in Action, K. Kumpulainen and M. Cesar, eds.

    Gadsden, V. L. 2008. The Arts and Education: Knowledge Generation, Pedagogy, and the Discourse of Learning. Review of Research in Education 32: 29-61.

    Faculty Fellow

    Richard J. Gelles

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    Dean and Joanne and Raymond Welsh Chair of Child Welfare and Family Violence

    About

    Richard J. Gelles is Dean of the School of Social Policy and Practice and the Joanne and Raymond Welsh Chair of Child Welfare and Family Violence. He is also Director for the Center for Research on Youth and Social Policy and Co-Director of the Field Center for Children’s Policy Practice and Research. Gelles is an internationally known expert in domestic violence and child welfare and was influential in the passage of the Adoption and Safe Families Act of 1997. Gelles is the author of the highly influential book The Violent Home, which was the first systematic investigation to provide empirical data on domestic violence. His more recent books have also made a significant impact in the study of child welfare and family violence. He is the author of 24 books and more than 100 articles, chapters and papers. 

    Selected Publications

    Gelles, Richard J. 2011. The Third Lie: Why Government Programs Don’t Work—and a Proposal for One that Would. Philadelphia, PA: University of Pennsylvania Press.

    Gelles, Richard J. 1972. The Violent Home: A study of physical aggression between husbands and wives.

    Oxford, England: Sage.

    Gelles, Richard J. 1996. The Book of David: How Preserving Families Can Cost Children's Lives. New York: Basic Books.

    Gelles, Richard J. 1997. Intimate Violence in Families, 3rd edition. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.

    Loseke, Donilene R., Richard J. Gelles, and Mary Cavanaugh. 2005. Current Controversies on Family Violence, 2nd edition. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications. 

    Faculty Fellow

    Karen Glanz

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    George A. Weiss University Professor, Professor of Epidemiology and Nursing, School of Nursing, Perelman School of Medicine

    About

    Karen Glanz, PhD, MPH is George A. Weiss University Professor in the Perelman School of Medicine and the School of Nursing, and Director of the CDC-funded University of Pennsylvania Prevention Research Center. She was previously at Emory University (2004-2009), the University of Hawaii (1993 to 2004), and Temple University. A globally influential public health scholar whose work spans psychology, epidemiology, nutrition and other disciplines, her research in community and health care settings focuses on obesity, nutrition, and the built environment; chronic disease management and control; reducing health disparities; and health communication technologies.  Her research and publications about understanding, measuring and improving healthy food environments, beginning in the 1980’s, and have been widely recognized and replicated. In particular, she has led the development of the widely-used NEMS (Nutrition Environment Measures Survey) audit tools for assessing food environments in stores, restaurants, and other retail food settings. She is a member of the US Task Force on Community Preventive Services.  Dr. Glanz is senior editor of Health Behavior and Health Education: Theory, Research, and Practice (Jossey-Bass Inc.), a widely used text now in its fourth edition.  Dr. Glanz was elected to membership in the Institute of Medicine (IOM) of the National Academy of Sciences in 2013.  She was designated a Highly Cited Author by ISIHighlyCited.com, in the top 0.5% of authors in her field over a 20-year period.

    Selected Publications

    Foster G, Karpyn A, Wojtanowski A, Davis E, Weiss S, Brensinger C, Tierney A, Guo W, Brown J, Spross C, Leuchten D, Burns P, Glanz K.  Placement strategies to increase the sales of healthier products in supermarkets in low-income, ethnically-diverse neighborhoods: A randomized controlled trial.  American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 99: 1359-1368, 2014.

    Cavanaugh E, Green S, Mallya G, Tierney A, Brensinger C, Glanz K.  Changes in Food and Beverage Environments after an Urban Corner Store Intervention.  Preventive Medicine, 65:7-12, 2014.

    Lucan SC, Hillier A, Schechter CB, Glanz K.  Objective and self-reported factors associated with food environment perceptions and fruit-and-vegetable consumption:  A multilevel analysis.  Preventing Chronic Disease, 2014; 11: 130324.

    Kegler MC, Swan DW, Alcantara I, Feldman L, Glanz K.  The influence of rural home and neighborhood environments on healthy eating, physical activity, and weight.  Prevention Science, 2014; 15:1-11.

    Cannuscio CC, Tappe K, Hillier A, Buttenheim A, Karpyn A, Glanz K.  An assessment of the urban food environment and residents’ shopping behaviors in that environment.  American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 45: 606-614, 2013.

    Fellow

    Angela Glover Blackwell

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    President and CEO, PolicyLink

    Areas of Interest

      About

      Angela Glover Blackwell, President and CEO, started PolicyLink in 1999 and continues to drive its mission of advancing economic and social equity. Under Angela’s leadership, PolicyLink has gained national prominence in the movement to use public policy to improve access and opportunity for all low-income people and communities of color, particularly in the areas of health, housing, transportation, and infrastructure. Prior to founding PolicyLink, Angela served as Senior VP at the Rockefeller Foundation. A lawyer by training, she gained national recognition as founder of the Oakland (CA) Urban Strategies Council. From 1977 to 1987, Angela was a partner at Public Advocates. Angela is the co-author of Uncommon Common Ground: Race and America’s Future (W.W. Norton & Co., 2010). In 2013, Angela and PolicyLink collaborated with the Center for American Progress to write and release All In Nation: An America that Works for All.  Angela serves on numerous boards, including the Children’s Defense Fund and the W. Haywood Burns Institute. She advises the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve as one of 15 members of its Community Advisory Council. Angela earned a bachelor’s degree from Howard University, and a law degree from the University of California, Berkeley.

      Selected Publications

      Blackwell, Angela Glover. 2016, forthcoming. The Curb-Cut Effect. Stanford Social Innovation Review 14.1.

      Blackwell, Angela Glover. 2015. Race, Place, and Financial Security: Building Equitable Communities of Opportunity. In What It’s Worth: Strengthening the Financial Future of Families, Communities and the Nation, 105-112. L. Choi, D. Erickson, K. Griffin, A. Levere & E. Seidman, (eds.) Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco and CFED.

      Blackwell, Angela Glover. 2014. Foreword. In Worlds Apart: Poverty and Politics in Rural America, Second Edition, by Cynthia Duncan. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press.

      Blackwell, Angela Glover and Neera Tanden. 2013. Preface. In All-In Nation: An America that Works for All. PolicyLink and the Center for American Progress.

      Blackwell, Angela Glover, Stewart Kwoh and Manuel Pastor. 2010. Uncommon Common Ground: Race and America’s Future. New York, NY: W.W. Norton & Co., Inc.

       

      Faculty Fellow

      Pam Grossman

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      Dean, George and Diane Weiss Professor of Education, Graduate School of Education, University of Pennsylvania

      School/Department

      Areas of Interest

        About

        Pam Grossman joined Penn as the Dean of the Graduate School of Education in January 2015. A distinguished scholar, she came to Penn from Stanford University’s School of Education, where she was the Nomellini-Olivier Professor of Education. At Stanford she founded and led the Center to Support Excellence in Teaching and established the Hollyhock Fellowship for early career teachers in underserved schools. Before joining Stanford, she was the Boeing Professor of Teacher Education at the University of Washington. Dr. Grossman serves on the boards of some of the nation’s foremost organizations for promoting rigorous educational research and teacher excellence. She was elected to the National Academy of Education in 2009 and currently sits on the Academy’s Board of Directors. She is Vice Chair of the Spencer Foundation Board of Directors and is an incoming member of the Board of the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. She also served as Member at Large and Vice President of the Division on Teaching and Teacher Education for the American Educational Research Association.

        Selected Publications

        Grossman, P., Cohen, J., Ronfeldt, M., & Brown, L. (2014).  The test matters: The relationship between classroom observation scores and teacher value added on multiple types of assessment. Educational Researcher, 43: 293-303

        Grossman, P., Cohen, J., & Brown, L. (2014).  Understanding instructional quality in English Language Arts: Variations in the relationship between PLATO and value-added by content and context.  In T. Kane, K. Kerr, & R. Pianta  (Eds.).  Designing teacher evaluation systems: New guidance from the  Measures of Effective Teaching project.  John Wiley & Sons.

        Grossman, P., Loeb, S., Cohen, J., & Wyckoff, J. (2013).  Measure for measure: The relationship between measures of instructional practice in middle school English Language Arts and teachers' value-added scores.  American Journal of Education, 119(3), 445-470.

        Hill, H. & Grossman, P. (2013). Learning from teacher evaluations: Challenges and opportunities. Harvard Education Press, 371-384.

        Boyd, D, Grossman, P., Hammerness, K., Lankford, H., Loeb, S., & Ronfeldt, M. (2012). Recruiting effective math teachers: Evidence from New York City.  American Educational Research Journal. 49 (4), 1008-1047.

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