People

Penn IUR is affiliated with more than 200 experts in the field of urbanism. Its Faculty Fellows program identifies faculty at the University of Pennsylvania with a demonstrated interest in urban research; the Penn IUR Scholars program identifies urban scholars outside of Penn; and the Penn IUR Fellows program identifies expert urban practitioners. Together, these programs foster a community of scholars and encourage cross-disciplinary collaboration.

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Faculty Fellow

Pam Grossman

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Dean, George and Diane Weiss Professor of Education, Graduate School of Education, University of Pennsylvania

School/Department

Areas of Interest

    About

    Pam Grossman joined Penn as the Dean of the Graduate School of Education in January 2015. A distinguished scholar, she came to Penn from Stanford University’s School of Education, where she was the Nomellini-Olivier Professor of Education. At Stanford she founded and led the Center to Support Excellence in Teaching and established the Hollyhock Fellowship for early career teachers in underserved schools. Before joining Stanford, she was the Boeing Professor of Teacher Education at the University of Washington. Dr. Grossman serves on the boards of some of the nation’s foremost organizations for promoting rigorous educational research and teacher excellence. She was elected to the National Academy of Education in 2009 and currently sits on the Academy’s Board of Directors. She is Vice Chair of the Spencer Foundation Board of Directors and is an incoming member of the Board of the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. She also served as Member at Large and Vice President of the Division on Teaching and Teacher Education for the American Educational Research Association.

    Selected Publications

    Grossman, P., Cohen, J., Ronfeldt, M., & Brown, L. (2014).  The test matters: The relationship between classroom observation scores and teacher value added on multiple types of assessment. Educational Researcher, 43: 293-303

    Grossman, P., Cohen, J., & Brown, L. (2014).  Understanding instructional quality in English Language Arts: Variations in the relationship between PLATO and value-added by content and context.  In T. Kane, K. Kerr, & R. Pianta  (Eds.).  Designing teacher evaluation systems: New guidance from the  Measures of Effective Teaching project.  John Wiley & Sons.

    Grossman, P., Loeb, S., Cohen, J., & Wyckoff, J. (2013).  Measure for measure: The relationship between measures of instructional practice in middle school English Language Arts and teachers' value-added scores.  American Journal of Education, 119(3), 445-470.

    Hill, H. & Grossman, P. (2013). Learning from teacher evaluations: Challenges and opportunities. Harvard Education Press, 371-384.

    Boyd, D, Grossman, P., Hammerness, K., Lankford, H., Loeb, S., & Ronfeldt, M. (2012). Recruiting effective math teachers: Evidence from New York City.  American Educational Research Journal. 49 (4), 1008-1047.

    Faculty Fellow

    Jessie Handbury

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    Assistant Professor of Real Estate

    About

    Jessie Handbury is Assistant Professor of Real Estate at The Wharton School and a Faculty Research Fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER). Her research interests lie at the intersection of urban economics, trade, and industrial organization. Her recent articles use detailed data on retail sales to characterize how product prices and availability vary across U.S. cities and to measure the implications of this variation on household living costs. Her current research examines spatial and socio-economic disparities in the availability and consumption of food products. This work, supported by the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the Wharton Social Impact Initiative, seeks to understand the roles that differentials in price sensitivity, nutritional preferences, and retail access each play in explaining socio-economic disparities in nutrition. 

    Selected Publications

    Handbury, Jessie, Ilya Rahkovsky, and Molly Schnell2015. “What Drives Nutritional Disparities? Retail Access and Food Purchases Across the Socioeconomic Spectrum.” NBER Working Paper Series Volume w21126.

    Handbury, Jessie, and David E. Weinstein. 2014. “Goods prices and availability in cities.” The Review of Economic Studies 82(1): 258-296.

    Handbury, Jessie. 2014. “Are poor cities cheap for everyone? Non-homotheticity and the cost of living across us cities." Zell-Lurie working papers.

     

    Penn IUR Scholar

    Harry J. Holzer

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    Professor of Public Policy, McCourt School of Public Policy at Georgetown

    Areas of Interest

      About

      Harry J. Holzer is a Professor of Public Policy in the McCourt School of Public Policy at Georgetown University. He is also an Institute Fellow at the American Institutes for Research. Since receiving his Ph.D. in economics from Harvard in 1983, Holzer has also served as a Professor of Economics at Michigan State University, the Chief Economist of the U.S. Department of Labor (in the Clinton Administration),  and an Institute Fellow at the Urban Institute. He has been the co-founder and co-director of the Georgetown Center on Poverty, Inequality, and Public Policy. He serves on the Board of Directors of the National Skills Coalition and the Economic Mobility Corporation. Holzer has authored or edited eleven books and has published several dozen articles in peer-reviewed journals, focusing mostly on the low-wage labor market. His policy interests include workforce development, EEO and affirmative action, the Earned Income Tax Credit, Pell Grant reform, immigration reform, and removing barriers to work for ex-offenders.

      Selected Publications

      Holzer, Harry J. Julia Lane, David Rosenblum, and Fredrik Andersson. 2011. Where Are All the Good Jobs Going? New York: Russell Sage Foundation.

      Edelman, Peter B., Harry J. Holzer, and Paul Offner. 2006. Reconnecting Disadvantaged Young Men. Washington, DC: The Urban Institute.

      Andersson, Fredrik, Harry J. Holzer, and Julia Lane. 2005. Moving Up or Moving On: Who Advances in the Low-Wage Labor Market. Russell Sage Foundation.

      Holzer, Harry J. 1999. What Employers Want: Job Prospects for Less-educated Workers. New York: Russell Sage Foundation.

      Freeman, Richard B. and Harry J. Holzer, eds. 1986. The Black Youth Employment Crisis. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

      Penn IUR Scholar

      Jordan Hyatt

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      Senior Research Associate, Jerry Lee Center of Criminology; Lecturer, Department of Criminology, School of Arts and Sciences, University of Pennsylvania

      Areas of Interest

        About

        Jordan Hyatt is Senior Research Associate of the Jerry Lee Center of Criminology and a Lecturer in the Department of Criminology in the School of Arts and Sciences at the University of Pennsylvania. Previously, he served as a Public Interest Scholar at Villanova University School of Law. His recent research is focused on the integration of offender risk-assessment into sentencing decisions as well as the impact of cognitive behavioral therapy and social networks on high-risk probationers. He also currently works with the Pennsylvania Commission on Sentencing, the First Judicial District Reform Commission, and the Pennsylvania Innocence Project.

        Selected Publications

        Hyatt, J. M. & Barnes, G. C. (2014). The Impact of Intensive Supervision on the Recidivism of High-Risk Probationers. Results from a Randomized Trial.  Forthcoming.

        Barnes, G. C., Hyatt, J. M., Ahlman, L. C., & Kent, D. T. (2012). The Long Term Effects of Low Intensity Supervision for Lower Risk Probationers: Updated Results from a Randomized Controlled Trial. Journal of Criminal Justice, 35(2): 200-220.

        Hyatt, J. M., Chanenson, S. L., & Bergstrom, M. H. (2011). Reform in Motion: The Promise and Perils of Incorporating Risk Assessments and Cost-Benefit Analysis into Pennsylvania Sentencing. Duquesne Law Review, 49(4): 707-749.

        Barnes, G. C., & Hyatt, J. M. (2011). “Randomized Experiments and the Advancement of Criminological Theory.” In J. MacDonald (Ed.), Advances in Criminological Theory, Transaction Publishers: New Brunswick, NJ (Vol. 17).

        Affiliated PhD Student

        Krista Iskander

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        Doctoral Student, City and Regional Planning, School of Design, University of Pennslyvania

        About

        Krista Iskander is a doctoral student in City and Regional Planning at the University of Pennslyvania.
        Faculty Fellow

        Roberta Iversen

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        Associate Professor

        About

        Roberta Iversen is Associate Professor in the School of Social Policy & Practice. She uses ethnographic research to extend knowledge about economic mobility, especially in urban families who are working but still poor and recently in exurban middle-income families as well. Her ethnographic accounts illuminate what low-income working parents need from secondary schools, job training organizations, businesses and firms, their children’s public schools, and public policy in order to earn enough to support their families through work. Housing policy in Milwaukee, WI and workforce development programs and policy in New Orleans, LA, Seattle, WA, St. Louis, MO, and Philadelphia, PA have been improved by findings from Iversen's research. Iversen is also working on a book manuscript, tentatively called Everyday Works in the Land of (Limited) Opportunity. . The book, based on qualitative research she has conducted since the 1980s, examines the experiences of individuals and families with labor-market work in relation to changes in the labor market over time. It concludes by proposing new ideas about "work" -- including redefining what counts as "work" in the U.S.

        Selected Publications

        Parsons Leigh, J., A. Gauthier, R.R. Iversen, S. Luhr, L. and Napolitano. 2016. “Caught in between: Neoliberal rhetoric and middle-income families in Canada and the United States.” Journal of Family Studies.

        Iversen, R. R., L. Napolitano, and F. F. Furstenberg. 2011. “Middle-income Families in the Economic Downturn: Challenges and Management Strategies over Time.” Longitudinal and Life Course Studies: International Journal 2(3): 286-300.

        Iversen, R. R. and A. L. Armstrong. 2008. “Hurricane Katrina and New Orleans: What Might an Embeddedness Perspective Offer Disaster Research and Planning?” Analyses of Social Issues and Public Policy 8(1): 183-209.

        Iversen, R. R. and A. L. Armstrong. 2006. Jobs Aren’t Enough: Toward a New Economic Mobility for Low-income Families. Philadelphia: Temple University Press.

        Iversen, R. R. 2002. Moving Up is a Steep Climb. Baltimore, MD: The Annie E. Casey Foundation.

        Penn IUR Scholar

        Paul A. Jargowsky

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        Professor of Public Policy and Director, Center for Urban Research and Urban Education, Rutgers University

        Senior Research Affiliate, National Poverty Center, University of Michigan

        Areas of Interest

          About

          Paul A. Jargowksy is Professor of Public Policy and Director, Center for Urban Research and Urban Education at Rutgers University. His primary areas of research focus on racial and economic segregation, the impacts of economic and spatial inequality, and the origins and consequences of exclusionary suburban development patterns. Prior to his position as Professor of Public Policy at Rutgers University, he was the Project Director for the New York State Task Force on Poverty and Welfare Reform and was also involved in fair housing and desegregation litigation as a consultant and expert witness. Jargowsky contributed to the report of the Task Force, The New Social Contract: Rethinking the Nature and Purpose of Public Assistance, which was extremely influential in reshaping the welfare reform debate. His book Poverty and Place was recognized as the “Best Book in Urban Affairs Published in 1997 or 1998” by the Urban Affairs Association.

          Selected Publications

          Jargowsky, Paul A. and Jeongdai Kim. 2009. The Information Theory of Segregation: Uniting Segregation and Inequality in a Common Framework, Research on Economic Inequality, 17: 3-31.

          Kim, Jeongdai and Paul A. Jargowsky. 2009. The GINI Coefficient and Segregation on a Continuous Variable. Research on Economic Inequality, 17: 1129-1151.

          Jargowsky, Paul A. 2003. Stunning Progress, Hidden Problems: The Dramatic Decline of Concentrated Poverty in the 1990s. Washington, DC: The Brookings Institution.

          Jargowsky, Paul A. 1997. Poverty and Place: Ghettos, Barrios, and the American City. New York: Russell Sage Foundation. 

          Penn IUR Scholar

          Rucker C. Johnson

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          Associate Professor, Goldman School of Public Policy, University of California Berkeley

          Areas of Interest

            About

            Rucker C. Johnson is Associate Professor at the Goldman School of Public Policy at the University of California-Berkeley. Johnson is also a Faculty Research Fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research, a Faculty Research Fellow at the W.E.B. Du Bois Institute at Harvard, a Research Affiliate at the National Poverty Center at the University of Michigan, and a Research Affiliate at the Institute for Poverty Research at the University of Wisconsin. Johnson’s research is primarily concerned with the role of poverty and inequality in affecting life chances and opportunities. He looks at problems commonly associated with poverty such as low-wage labor markets, spatial mismatch, the societal consequences of incarceration, the impacts of childhood school and neighborhood quality on adult health and socioeconomic success, and educational attainment. 

            Selected Publications

            Johnson, Rucker C., Ariel Kalil, and Rachel Dunifon. 2010. Mothers’ Work and Children’s Lives: Low-income Families After Welfare Reform. Kalamazoo, MI: Upjohn Institute Press.

            Johnson, Rucker C. 2011. Health Dynamics and the Evolution of Health Inequality over the Life Course: The Importance of Neighborhood and Family Background. B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy: Advances.

            Johnson, Rucker C., Ariel Kalil, and Rachel Dunifon. 2011. Employment Patterns of Less-Skilled Workers: Links to Children’s Behavior and Academic Progress. Demography, 47(3).

            Johnson, Rucker C. 2010. The Health Returns of Education Policies: From Preschool to High School & Beyond. American Economic Review Papers and Proceedings.

            Penn IUR Scholar

            Mark L. Joseph

            x

            Associate Professor, Jack, Joseph and Morton Mandel School of Applied Social Sciences

            Director, National Initiative on Mixed-Income Communities

            Faculty Associate, Center on Urban Poverty and Community Development, Case Western Reserve University

            About

            Mark L. Joseph is an Associate Professor at the Mandel School of Applied Social Sciences, Director of the National Initiative on Mixed-Income Communities, and a Faculty Associate at the Center on Urban Poverty and Community Development at Case Western Reserve University. Joseph teaches classes on community practice. His fields of interest are urban poverty, community development, mixed-income development, and comprehensive community initiatives. In 2013 he launched the National Initiative on Mixed-Income Communities (NIMC) to serve as a central resource for research and information on creating and sustained mixed-income developments.  His research and evaluation work includes mixed-income public housing transformations in Chicago, San Francisco, and Akron, Ohio.  He is on the Urban Institute team conducting the national evaluation of the federal government's Choice Neighborhoods Initiative.  The NIMC will provide a database on mixed-income developments across the country as well as a mixed-income library and periodic scans of the field (nimc.case.edu).

            Selected Publications

            Joseph, M. L. 2013. Mixed-income Symposium Summary and Response: Implications for Antipoverty Policy. Cityscape, 15(2): 215-221.

            McCormick, N., M L. Joseph, and R. J. Chaskin. 2012. The New Stigma of Relocated Public Housing Residents: Challenges to Social Identity in Mixed-income Developments. City and Community, 11(3): 285-308.

            Chaskin, R. J. and M. L. Joseph. 2012. “Positive” Gentrification, Social Inclusion, and the “Right to the City” in Mixed-income Communities: Uses and Expectations of Space and Place. International Journal of Urban and Regional Research, 37(2): 280-302.

            Joseph, M. L. 2011. Reinventing Older Communities Through Mixed-income Development: What are We Learning from Chicago’s Public Housing Transformation? In Neighborhood and Life Chances: How Place Matters in Modern America, 122-139. Harriet B. Newburger, Eugénie L. Birch, and Susan M. Wachter, eds. 122-139. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press. 

            Fellow

            Elizabeth Kneebone

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            Fellow, Brookings Institution, Metropolitan Policy Program

            About

            Elizabeth Kneebone is a fellow at the Metropolitan Policy Program at Brookings and co-author of Confronting Suburban Poverty in America (Brookings Press, 2013). Her work primarily focuses on urban and suburban poverty, metropolitan demographics, and tax policies that support low-income workers and communities. In Confronting Suburban Poverty In America she and co-author Alan Berube address the changing geography of metropolitan poverty and offer pragmatic solutions for reforming and modernizing the nation’s policy and practice framework for alleviating poverty and increasing access to opportunity.

            Selected Publications

            Kneebone, Elizabeth and Alan Berube. 2013. Confronting Suburban Poverty in America. Washington: DC: Brookings Institution Press.
             
            Kneebone, Elizabeth and Carey Nadeau. 2013. “The Resurgence of Concentrated Poverty in America: Metropolitan Trends in the 2000s.” In The New American 
            Suburbs: Poverty, Race, and the Mortgage Crisis, edited by Katrin Anacker. Ashgate.
            Carey Nadeau).
             
            Kneebone, Elizabeth and Steven Raphael. 2011. “City and Suburban Crime Trends in Metropolitan America.” Brookings Institution.
            Affiliated PhD Student

            Jacob Krimmel

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            PhD Candidate, Applied Economics, The Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania

            About

            Jacob Krimmel is a third year PhD student in Applied Economics at The Wharton School, where he works closely with Professors Fernando Ferreira, Ben Keys, and Joe Gyourko of the Real Estate Department. Jacob’s interests are at the intersection of urban economics and public policy, including housing and real estate economics, consumer finance, local public economics, and income and wealth inequality. He is currently researching how federal policy and mortgage lending discrimination that occurred decades ago still has lasting impacts on neighborhoods across the US today. Prior to Wharton, Jacob worked as a research assistant at the Federal Reserve Board in Washington, DC, where his office studied the evolution of consumer finances and household wealth before, during, and after the Great Recession. Jacob has a master’s degree in public policy from the University of Maryland, where he also double-majored in economics and political science. In his free time, Jacob enjoys taking his dog Miso to the park, cheering on the Baltimore Orioles and Liverpool FC, and traveling to new cities. 

            Selected Publications

            Bricker, Jesse, Alice Henriques, Jacob Krimmel, and John Sabelhaus (2016). "Estimating Top Income and Wealth Shares: Sensitivity to Data and Methods," American Economic Review: Papers and Proceedings, vol. 106, no. 5, pp. 641-645.

            Bricker, Jesse, Alice Henriques, Jacob Krimmel, and John Sabelhaus (2016). "Measuring Income and Wealth at the Top Using Administrative and Survey Data," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Spring, pp. 261-321.

            Bricker, Jesse, Rodney Ramcharan, and Jacob Krimmel (2014). "Signaling Status: The Impact of Relative Income on Household Consumption and Financial Decisions," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2014-76. Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System.

            Dettling, Lisa J., Sebastian J. Devlin-Foltz, Jacob Krimmel, Sarah J. Pack, and Jeffrey P. Thompson (2015). "Comparing Micro and Macro Sources for Household Accounts in the United States: Evidence from the Survey of Consumer Finances," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2015-086. Washington: Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System.

            Faculty Fellow

            Shiriki Kumanyika

            x

            Emeritus Professor of Biostatistics and Epidemiology

            About

            Shiriki Kumanyika is Emeritus Professor of Biostatistics and Epidemiology in the Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology in the Perelman School of Medicine. She holds advanced degrees in social work, nutrition, and public health. During her tenure on the Penn Medicine faculty, Kumanyika served as the Associate Dean for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention, held a secondary appointment as Professor of Epidemiology in the Department of Pediatrics (Division of Gastroenterology, Nutrition Section), and was affiliated with numerous Penn institutes and centers. She was the founding Director of Penn's interdisciplinary, multi-school Master of Public Health program. Her research focuses on identifying effective strategies to reduce nutrition-related chronic disease risks, with a particular focus on achieving health equity for black Americans. For more than three decades, she has led or collaborated on single- or multi-center randomized clinical trials or observational studies related to obesity, salt intake, and other aspects of diet. She founded (in 2002) and continues to chair the African American Collaborative Obesity Research Network (AACORN) (http://www.aacorn.org), a national network that seeks to improve the quantity, quality, and effective translation of research on weight issues in African American communities. Kumanyika is a member of the National Academy of Medicine and is a past President of the American Public Health Association.

            Selected Publications

            Huang, Terry T-K, John H Cawley, Marice Ashe, Sergio A Costa, Leah M Frerichs, Lindsey Zwicker, Juan A Rivera, David Levy, Ross A Hammond, Estelle V Lambert, and Shiriki Kumanyika. 2015. “Mobilisation of public support for policy actions to prevent obesity.” Lancet 385(9985): 2422-2431.

            Powell, Lisa M, Roy Wada, Shiriki Kumanyika. 2014. “Racial/ethnic and income disparities in child and adolescent exposure to food and beverage television ads across the U.S. media markets.” Health and Place 29C: 124-131.

            Kumanyika, S. K., M.C. Whitt-Glover C, D. Haire-Joshu. 2014. “What works for obesity prevention and treatment in black Americans? Research directions.” Obesity Reviews: An Official Journal of the International Association for the Study of Obesity 15(Suppl 4): 204-212.

            Morales, Knashawn H, Shiriki K Kumanyika, Jennifer E Fassbender, Jerene Good, A Russell Localio, and Thomas A Wadden. 2014. “Patterns of weight change in black Americans: pooled analysis from three behavioral weight loss trials.” Obesity 22(12): 2632-2640.

            Chatterji, Madhabi, Lawrence W Green, and Shiriki Kumanyika. 2014. “L.E.A.D.: a framework for evidence gathering and use for the prevention of obesity and other complex public health problems.” Health Education and Behavior: The Official Publication of the Society for Public Health Education 41(1): 85-99.

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