People

Penn IUR is affiliated with more than 200 experts in the field of urbanism. Its Faculty Fellows program identifies faculty at the University of Pennsylvania with a demonstrated interest in urban research; the Penn IUR Scholars program identifies urban scholars outside of Penn; and the Penn IUR Fellows program identifies expert urban practitioners. Together, these programs foster a community of scholars and encourage cross-disciplinary collaboration.

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Penn IUR Scholar

Elijah Anderson

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William K. Lanman, Jr. Professor of Sociology, Yale University

About

Elijah Anderson is the William K. Lanman, Jr. Professor of Sociology at Yale University. He is widely considered one of the best urban ethnographers in the United States. His publications include Code of the Street: Decency, Violence, and the Moral Life of the Inner City (1999), winner of the Komarovsky Award from the Eastern Sociological Society; Streetwise: Race, Class, and Change in an Urban Community (1990), winner of the American Sociological Association’s Robert E. Park Award for the best published book in the area of Urban Sociology, and the classic sociological work, A Place on the Corner (1978, 2nd ed., 2003). Anderson’s most recent ethnographic work, The Cosmopolitan Canopy: Race and Civility in Everyday Life, was published by WW Norton in March 2012. Anderson is the 2013 recipient of the prestigious Cox-Johnson-Frazier Award of the American Sociological Association. His research interests include inequality, race relations, urban ethnography, sociology of culture, and crime, and social control.

Selected Publications

Anderson, Elijah, Dana Asbury, Duke W. Austin, Esther Chihye Kim, and Vani Kulkarni, eds. 2012. Bringing Fieldwork Back In: Contemporary Urban Ethnographic Research. The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science 642 (June). Sage Press.

Anderson, Elijah. 2012. The Cosmopolitan Canopy: Race and Civility in Everyday Life. New York: W. W. Norton & Company.

Anderson, Elijah, ed. 2009. Urban Ethnography: Its Traditions and Its Future. Ethnography 10(4), Special Double Issue. Sage Press. 

Anderson, Elijah, ed. 2008. Against the Wall: Poor, Young, Black, and Male. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.

Anderson, Elijah, Scott N. Brooks, Raymond Gunn, and Nikki Jones, eds. 2004. Being Here and Being There: Fieldwork Encounters and Ethnographic Discoveries. The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science 595 (September). New York: Sage Press.

Faculty Fellow

Phillipe Bourgois

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Richard Perry University Professor of Anthropology and Family and Community Medicine

About

Philippe Bourgois is the Richard Perry University Professor of Anthropology and Family and Community Medicine in the Department of Anthropology, School of Arts and Sciences. He has conducted fieldwork in Central America (Costa Rica, Panama, Nicaragua, El Salvador, and Belize) and in the urban United States (East Harlem in New York and San Francisco). In Central America his research addresses the political mobilization of ethnicity, immigration and labor relations, political violence, popular resistance, and the social dislocation of street children. His research in the United States confronts inner-city social suffering and critiques the political economy and cultural contours of US apartheid. He is also addressing gender power relations, and the intersections between structural and intimate violence. His most recent work focuses on substance abuse, violence, homelessness, and HIV-prevention. He has received numerous academic and grant awards including most recently a John Simon Guggenheim Award (2014).

Selected Publications

Karandinos G, Hart L, Montero Castrillo F, Bourgois P. 2014. Moral Economy of Violence in the U.S. Inner City. Current Anthropology. 55(1): 1–22.

Messac L, Ciccarone D, Draine J and Bourgois P. 2013. The Good-Enough Science-and-Politics of Anthropological Collaboration with Evidence-Based Clinical Research: Four Ethnographic Case Studies. Social Science & Medicine. 99: 176–186.

Philippe I. Bourgois, Jeffrey Schonberg. 2009. Righteous Dopefiend. University of California Press.

Scheper-Hughes, N. and P. Bourgois, eds. 2004. Violence in War and Peace: An Anthology. Oxford: Blackwell Publishing.

Bourgois. P. 2003, second updated edition. In Search of Respect: Selling Crack in El Barrio. New York: Cambridge University Press. 

Faculty Fellow

Charles Branas

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Professor of Epidemiology

Cartographic Modeling Laboratory

About

Charles Branas is Professor of Epidemiology in the Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology in the Perelman School of Medicine and Director of Penn’s Cartographic Modeling Laboratory. He works to improve health and healthcare and is recognized for his efforts to reduce violence and enhance emergency care. Much of his work incorporates human geography and spatial interactions. His studies have taken him to various places including the neighborhoods of Philadelphia, rural counties across the United States and cities and small towns in Guatemala and other countries. Branas has been on various boards and scientific review panels at the National Institutes of Health, the Centers for Disease Control, the Canadian National Research Council, the South African Medical Research Council, and is a Past President of the Society for Advancement of Violence and Injury Research. Before coming to Penn, he trained and conducted research at both the Johns Hopkins and University of California, Berkeley Schools of Public Health and worked at the US Department of Health and Human Services.

Selected Publications

 

Leung, A. C., D. A. Asch, K. N. Lozada, O. Saynisch, J. M. Asch, N. Becker, H. M. Griffis, F. Shofer, J. C. Hershey, S. Hill, C. C. Branas, G. Nichol, L. B. Becker, R. M. Merchant. 2013. Where Are Lifesaving Automated External Defibrillators Located and How Hard Is It to Find Them in a Large Urban City? Resuscitation 84(7): 910-914.

Branas, C. C., C. S. Wolff, J. Williams, G. Margolis, B. G. Carr. 2013. Simulating Changes to Emergency Care Resources to Compare System Effectiveness. Journal of Clinical Epidemiology 66(8): 57-64.

Myers, S. R., C. C. Branas, B. C. French, M. L. Nance, M. J. Kallan, D. J. Wiebe, B. G. Carr. 2013. Safety in Numbers: Are Major Cities the Safest Places in the US? Annals of Emergency Medicine 13: 520-529.

Mullen, M. T., S. Judd, V. J. Howard, S. E. Kasner, C. C. Branas, K. C. Albright, J. D. Rhodes, D. O. Kleindofer, B. G. Carr. 2013. Disparities in Evaluation at Certified Primary Stroke Centers: Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke. Stroke 44(7): 1930-1935.

Branas, C. C., A. R. DiNardo, V. D. Puac Polanco, M. J. Harvey, J. L. Vassy, K. Bream. 2013. An Exploration of Violence, Mental Health and Substance Abuse in Post-conflict Guatemala. Health 5(5): 825-833.

Faculty Fellow

Ram Cnaan

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Cnaan Associate Dean for Research, Professor, and Chair of the Doctoral Program in Social Welfare

Director of the Program for Religion and Social Policy Research

About

Ram Cnaan is the Associate Dean for Research, Professor, and Chair of the Doctoral Program in Social Welfare and the Director of the Program for Religion and Social Policy Research in the School of Social Policy and Practice. He is a world-renowned expert in studying faith-based social services and volunteerism. He carried out the first national study on the role of local religious congregations in the provision of social services as well as the first one-city census of congregations in one city (Philadelphia). Cnaan is now working on fiscally valuing the contribution of urban congregations. He has published numerous articles in scientific journals on a variety of social issues. In addition, he serves on the editorial board of eleven academic journals. He is working on an edited volume on innovative nonprofit organizations and also leading the Goldring Reentry Initiative to reduce ex-prisoners’ recidivism in Philadelphia. 

Selected Publications

Cnaan, R. A., and D. W. Curtis. 2013. Religious Congregations as Voluntary Associations: An

Overview. Nonprofit & Voluntary Sector Quarterly, 42(1): 7-33.

Boehm, A., and R. A. Cnaan. 2012. Towards a Practice-based Model for Community Practice: Linking Theory and Practice. Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare, XXXIX(2): 141-168.

Hustinx, L., L. C. P. M. Meijs, R. A. Cnaan and F. Handy. 2012. Monitorial Citizens or Civic Omnivores? Repertoires of Civic Participation among University Students. Youth and Society, 44(1): 93-115.

Cnaan, R. A., J. Draine, and M. E. Dichter, eds. 2008. A Century of Social Work and Social Welfare at Penn. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.

Boddie, S. C. and R. A. Cnaan, eds. 2007. Faith-based Social Services: Measures, Assessments, and Effectiveness. Bloomington, NY: Haworth Press.

Faculty Fellow

Dennis Culhane

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Professor and Dana and Andrew Stone Chair in Social Policy

About

Dennis Culhane is Professor and Dana and Andrew Stone Chair in Social Policy, School of Social Policy and Practice. His primary area of research is homelessness and assisted housing policy. His research has contributed to efforts to address the housing and support needs of people experiencing housing emergencies and long-term homelessness. Culhane’s recent research includes studies of vulnerable youth and young adults, including those transitioning from foster care, juvenile justice, and residential treatment services. Culhane is the Director of Research for the National Center on Homelessness among Veterans at the United States Department of Veterans Affairs. Culhane co-directs the Intelligence for Social Policy initiative (ISP), a MacArthur-funded project to promote the development of integrated database systems by states and localities for policy analysis and systems reform.

Selected Publications

Byrne, Thomas, Stephen Metraux, Manuel Moreno, Dennis Culhane, Halil Toros, and Max Stevens. 2012. Los Angeles County’s Enterprise Linkages Project: An Example of the Use of Integrated Data Systems in Making Data-Driven Policy and Program Decisions. California Journal of Politics and Policy 4.

Alvaro Cortes, Josh Leopold, Louise Rothschild, Larry Buron, Jill Khadduri, and Dennis Culhane. 2011. The 2010 Annual Homeless Assessment Report to Congress. The Selected Works of Dennis P. Culhane. Available at: http://works.bepress.com/dennis_culhane/105.

Culhane, Dennis P. and Stephen Metraux. 2008. Rearranging the Deck Chairs or Reallocating the Lifeboats?: Homelessness Assistance and Its Alternatives. Journal of the American Planning Association 74(1): 111-121.

Culhane, Dennis P. 2008. The Cost of Homelessness: A Perspective from the United States, European Journal of Homelessness. European Journal of Homelessness 2(1): 97-114.

Faculty Fellow

John DiIulio

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Frederic Fox Leadership Professor of Politics, Religion and Civil Society

Faculty Director & Co-Chair of the Director's Advisory Group, Robert A. Fox Leadership Program

About

John DiIulio is the Frederic Fox Leadership Professor of Politics, Religion and Civil Society in the Department of Political Science and Directs Penn's Fox Leadership Program for undergraduates, as well as its religion research program. Over the last quarter-century, he has won several major academic and teaching awards including the 2010 Ira Abrams Memorial Award and the 2010 Lindback Award for Distinguished Teaching.  He has also chaired his academic association's standing committee on professional ethics. Outside academic life, he has developed programs to mentor the children of prisoners, provide literacy training in low-income communities, reduce homicides in high-crime police districts, and support inner-city Catholic schools that serve low-income children. He has been a research center director at the Brookings Institution, the Manhattan Institute, and Public/Private Ventures. During his academic leave in 2001-2002, he served as first Director of the White House Office of Faith-Based and Community Initiatives. He is the author, co-author, and editor of over a dozen books and several hundred articles.

Selected Publications

Wilson, James Q. and John DiIulio. 2013. American Government: Institutions and Policies (13th edition). Cengage Learning.

DiIulio, John. 2009. Mayberry Machiavellis After All?: Why Judging George W. Bush Is Never as Easy as It Seems. In Judging Bush, Robert Taranto et al., eds. Stanford University Press.

DiIulio, John. 2009. More Religion, Less Crime?: Science, Felonies, and the Three Faith Factors. Annual Review of Law and Social Science, 5.

DiIulio, John. 2007. Godly Republic: A Centrist Blueprint for America’s Faith-Based Future. University of California Press.

Faculty Fellow

Richard J. Gelles

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Dean and Joanne and Raymond Welsh Chair of Child Welfare and Family Violence

About

Richard J. Gelles is Dean of the School of Social Policy and Practice and the Joanne and Raymond Welsh Chair of Child Welfare and Family Violence. He is also Director for the Center for Research on Youth and Social Policy and Co-Director of the Field Center for Children’s Policy Practice and Research. Gelles is an internationally known expert in domestic violence and child welfare and was influential in the passage of the Adoption and Safe Families Act of 1997. Gelles is the author of the highly influential book The Violent Home, which was the first systematic investigation to provide empirical data on domestic violence. His more recent books have also made a significant impact in the study of child welfare and family violence. He is the author of 24 books and more than 100 articles, chapters and papers. 

Selected Publications

Gelles, Richard J. 2011. The Third Lie: Why Government Programs Don’t Work—and a Proposal for One that Would. Philadelphia, PA: University of Pennsylvania Press.

Gelles, Richard J. 1972. The Violent Home: A study of physical aggression between husbands and wives.

Oxford, England: Sage.

Gelles, Richard J. 1996. The Book of David: How Preserving Families Can Cost Children's Lives. New York: Basic Books.

Gelles, Richard J. 1997. Intimate Violence in Families, 3rd edition. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.

Loseke, Donilene R., Richard J. Gelles, and Mary Cavanaugh. 2005. Current Controversies on Family Violence, 2nd edition. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications. 

Penn IUR Scholar

Edward Glaeser

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Fred and Eleanor Glimp Professor of Economics, Harvard University

Areas of Interest

    About

    Ed Glaeser is the Fred and Eleanor Glimp Professor of Economics at Harvard, where he also serves as Director of the Taubman Center for State and Local Government and the Rappaport Institute for Greater Boston. He studies the economics of cities, and has written widely on urban issues, including the growth of cities, segregation, crime, and housing markets. He has been particularly interested in the role that geographic proximity can play in creating knowledge and innovation. 

    Selected Publications

    Glaeser, Edward L. "Wealth and the Self-Protection Society." In 100 Years: Leading Economists Predict the Future. Ed. Ignacio Palacios-Huerta. MIT Press, 2014.

    Glaeser, Edward L. "Urban Public Finance." Handbook in Public Economics.Ed. Alan J. Auerbach, Raj Chetty, Martin Feldstein, and Emmanuel Saez. Elsevier B.V., 2013.

    Glaeser, Edward L., Christopher F. Chabris, James J. Lee, Daniel J. Benjamin, Jonathan P. Beauchamp, Gregoire Borst, Steven Pinker, and David I. Laibson. "Why It Is Hard to Find Genes Associated with Social Science Traits: Theoretical and Empirical Considerations." American Journal of Public Health 103.S1 (October 2013): S152-S166.

    Glaeser, Edward L., Steve Poftak, and Kristina Tobio. "What Do Parents Want? An Exploration of School Preferences Expressed by Boston Parents." HKS Faculty Research Working Paper Series RWP13-024, July 2013.

    Glaeser, Edward L. "A World of Cities: The Causes and Consequences of Urbanization in Poorer Countries." National Bureau of Economic Research, December 2013.

    Faculty Fellow

    Andrea Goulet

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    Associate Professor of Romance Languages

    About

    Andrea Goulet is an Associate Professor of Romance Languages in the School of Arts and Sciences. Prior to Penn, she served as Associate Professor of French at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. She is the author of two books on French fiction and literature. Her current research interests include Nineteenth- and twentieth-century French Fiction, critical theory, science and literature, detective fiction, and nouveau roman literature. Her forthcoming book explores scientific discourses in modern French crime fiction. She is currently co-chair of the Nineteenth-Century French Studies Association.

    Selected Publications

    Goulet, Andrea. Forthcoming. Legacies of the Rue Morgue: Space and Science in French Crime Fiction, 1866-2006.

    Goulet, Andrea. 2013. "Natural History and French Culture: Symposium Commentary." In Of Elephants & Roses: French Natural History 1790-1830, Sue Ann Prince, ed. Philadelphia: American Philosophical Society.

    Goulet, Andrea. 2008. Malet’s Maps and Butor’s Bleston: Space and Formal Play in the Roman Policier. L’Esprit Créateur, 48(2): 46-59.

    Goulet, Andrea.2007. Legacies of the Rue Morgue: Street Names and Private/Public Violence in Modern French Crime Fiction. Modern Language Quarterly, 68(1): 87-110.

    Goulet, Andrea. 2006. Optiques: The Science of the Eye and the Birth of Modern French Fiction. Philadelphia: Penn Press.

    Faculty Fellow

    Jeane Ann Grisso

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    Professor of Public Health, Medicine, and Nursing

    Professor of Public Health, Division of Family Medicine and Community Health

    About

    Jeane Ann Grisso is Professor of Public Health, Medicine, and Nursing in the School of Nursing and Professor of Public Health in the Division of Family Medicine and Community Health in the Perelman School of Medicine. Her research is focused on urban women’s health issues and she has served as principal investigator of federally funded studies of reproductive health, intimate partner violence (IPV), menopause, and aging. She is a Senior Scholar of the Center for Public Health Initiatives and serves as a core faculty member in the MPH program. She recently returned to Penn following seven years at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) where she was the Senior Program Officer for national human capital programs focusing on faculty development. Grisso is a Fellow of the American College of Physicians and was elected to be a Fellow of the American Epidemiological Society. She serves on the National Advisory Committee of the Harold Amos Medical Faculty Development Program, on the Advisory Boards of the Edna G. Kynette Memorial Foundation and the Bridging the Gaps Community Health Program, and has served as a member of the Epidemiology (EDC1) review panel at NIH and as a reviewer for numerous scientific journals.

    Selected Publications

    Hamilton-Boyles, S., R.B. Ness, J.A. Grisso, N. Markovic, J. Bromberger, D. Cifelli. 2001. Life Event Stress and the Association with Spontaneous Abortion in Gravid Women at an Urban Emergency Department. Health Psychology 19(6): 510-514. 

    Pollack, P., W. Austin, and J.A. Grisso. 2010. Employee Assistance Programs: A Workplace Resource to Address Intimate Partner Violence. Journal of Women’s Health, 19(4), 647-649.

    Making the Grade on Women’s Health. A National and State-by-State Report Card. National Women’s Law Center, FOCUS on Health and Leadership for Women, Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, and The Lewin Group. August 2000.

    Penn IUR Scholar

    Jordan Hyatt

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    Senior Research Associate, Jerry Lee Center of Criminology; Lecturer, Department of Criminology, School of Arts and Sciences, University of Pennsylvania

    Areas of Interest

      About

      Jordan Hyatt is Senior Research Associate of the Jerry Lee Center of Criminology and a Lecturer in the Department of Criminology in the School of Arts and Sciences at the University of Pennsylvania. Previously, he served as a Public Interest Scholar at Villanova University School of Law. His recent research is focused on the integration of offender risk-assessment into sentencing decisions as well as the impact of cognitive behavioral therapy and social networks on high-risk probationers. He also currently works with the Pennsylvania Commission on Sentencing, the First Judicial District Reform Commission, and the Pennsylvania Innocence Project.

      Selected Publications

      Hyatt, J. M. & Barnes, G. C. (2014). The Impact of Intensive Supervision on the Recidivism of High-Risk Probationers. Results from a Randomized Trial.  Forthcoming.

      Barnes, G. C., Hyatt, J. M., Ahlman, L. C., & Kent, D. T. (2012). The Long Term Effects of Low Intensity Supervision for Lower Risk Probationers: Updated Results from a Randomized Controlled Trial. Journal of Criminal Justice, 35(2): 200-220.

      Hyatt, J. M., Chanenson, S. L., & Bergstrom, M. H. (2011). Reform in Motion: The Promise and Perils of Incorporating Risk Assessments and Cost-Benefit Analysis into Pennsylvania Sentencing. Duquesne Law Review, 49(4): 707-749.

      Barnes, G. C., & Hyatt, J. M. (2011). “Randomized Experiments and the Advancement of Criminological Theory.” In J. MacDonald (Ed.), Advances in Criminological Theory, Transaction Publishers: New Brunswick, NJ (Vol. 17).

      Faculty Fellow

      John M. MacDonald

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      Penny and Robert A. Fox Faculty Director of Penn’s Fels Institute of Government, Professor of Criminology and Sociology

      About

      John M. MacDonald is Penny and Robert A. Fox Faculty Director of Penn’s Fels Institute of Government and Chair of the Department of Criminology. He focuses primarily on the study of interpersonal violence, race, and ethnic disparities in criminal justice, and the effect of public policy responses on crime.  His contributions to public policy research include numerous studies using rigorous, quasi-experimental and experimental designs showing the effects of social policies on crime, of institutional social justice reforms on crime, and more recently, the health effects of various policy interventions. He was awarded the Young Experimental Scholar Award by the Academy of Experimental Criminology for significant contributions to experimental research.  He also received the David N. Kershaw Award for distinguished contribution to the field of public policy analysis and management from the American Association of Public Policy Analysis and Management. His latest urban research examines the effects of land use zoning on crime and was supported by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Program on Public Health Law Research.

      Selected Publications

      Berk, R. and John M. MacDonald. 2010. Policing the Homeless: An Evaluation of Efforts to Reduce Homeless-Related Crime. Criminology and Public Policy, 9” 813-840.

      Cook, P. and John M. MacDonald. 2011. Public Safety through Private Action: An Economic Assessment of BIDs. Economic Journal, 121: 445-462.

      Branas, C.  R. Cheney, J. M. MacDonald, V. W. Tam, T. D. Jackson, T. R. Ten Have. 2011. A Difference-in-Differences Analysis of Health, Safety, and Greening of Vacant Urban Space. American Journal of Epidemiology, 174: 1296-1306.

      Anderson, J., J. M. MacDonald, R. Bluthenthal, and S. Ashwood.  2013. Reducing Crime by Shaping the Built Environment with Zoning: An Empirical Study of Los Angeles.  University of Pennsylvania Law Review, 161: 699-756.

      MacDonald, J. M., J. Hipp and C. Gill. 2013. The Effect of Immigrant Concentration on Changes in Neighborhood Crime Rates. Journal of Quantitative Criminology, 29: 191-215.

      Nicosia, N., J. M. MacDonald, and J. Arkes. 2013. Disparities in Criminal Court Referrals to Drug Treatment and Prison for Minority Men. American Journal of Public Health, 103: e77-e84.

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