People

Penn IUR is affiliated with more than 200 experts in the field of urbanism. Its Faculty Fellows program identifies faculty at the University of Pennsylvania with a demonstrated interest in urban research; the Penn IUR Scholars program identifies urban scholars outside of Penn; and the Penn IUR Fellows program identifies expert urban practitioners. Together, these programs foster a community of scholars and encourage cross-disciplinary collaboration.

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Penn IUR Scholar

Elijah Anderson

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William K. Lanman, Jr. Professor of Sociology, Yale University

About

Elijah Anderson is the William K. Lanman, Jr. Professor of Sociology at Yale University. He is widely considered one of the best urban ethnographers in the United States. His publications include Code of the Street: Decency, Violence, and the Moral Life of the Inner City (1999), winner of the Komarovsky Award from the Eastern Sociological Society; Streetwise: Race, Class, and Change in an Urban Community (1990), winner of the American Sociological Association’s Robert E. Park Award for the best published book in the area of Urban Sociology, and the classic sociological work, A Place on the Corner (1978, 2nd ed., 2003). Anderson’s most recent ethnographic work, The Cosmopolitan Canopy: Race and Civility in Everyday Life, was published by WW Norton in March 2012. Anderson is the 2013 recipient of the prestigious Cox-Johnson-Frazier Award of the American Sociological Association. His research interests include inequality, race relations, urban ethnography, sociology of culture, and crime, and social control.

Selected Publications

Anderson, Elijah, Dana Asbury, Duke W. Austin, Esther Chihye Kim, and Vani Kulkarni, eds. 2012. Bringing Fieldwork Back In: Contemporary Urban Ethnographic Research. The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science 642 (June). Sage Press.

Anderson, Elijah. 2012. The Cosmopolitan Canopy: Race and Civility in Everyday Life. New York: W. W. Norton & Company.

Anderson, Elijah, ed. 2009. Urban Ethnography: Its Traditions and Its Future. Ethnography 10(4), Special Double Issue. Sage Press. 

Anderson, Elijah, ed. 2008. Against the Wall: Poor, Young, Black, and Male. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.

Anderson, Elijah, Scott N. Brooks, Raymond Gunn, and Nikki Jones, eds. 2004. Being Here and Being There: Fieldwork Encounters and Ethnographic Discoveries. The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science 595 (September). New York: Sage Press.

Faculty Fellow

Ram Cnaan

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Professor; Program Director, Program for Religion and Social Policy Research

Faculty Director, Goldring Reentry Initiative

About

Ram Cnaan is Professor of Social Welfare, Director of the Program for Religion and Social Policy Research, and Faculty Director of the Goldring Reentry Initiative in the School of Social Policy & Practice. He is a world-renowned expert in studying faith-based social services and volunteerism. He carried out the first national study on the role of local religious congregations in the provision of social services as well as the first one-city census of congregations in one city (Philadelphia). Cnaan is now working on fiscally valuing the contribution of urban congregations as well as working on an edited volume on innovative nonprofit organizations and leading the Goldring Reentry Initiative to reduce ex-prisoners’ recidivism in Philadelphia. In addition, he serves on the editorial board of eleven academic journals. 

Selected Publications

Luria, G., R.A. Cnaan, and A. Boehm. In Press. “Religious attendance and volunteering: Testing national culture as a boundary condition.” Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion.

Cnaan, Ram A. And Toorjo Ghose. 2017. “Doctoral Social Work Education.” Research on Social Work Practice. 

Heist, D. H., and R.A. Cnaan. 2016. “Faith-based international development work: A review.” Religions 7(3): 1-17.

Cnaan, R. A., and S. An. 2016. “Harnessing faith for improved quality of life: Government and faithbased nonprofit organizations in partnership.” Human Service Organizations Management, Leadership and Governance 40(3): 208-219.

Cnaan, R. A., and D. Kaplan Vinokur. 2014. Cases in innovative nonprofits: Organizations that make a difference. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. 

Faculty Fellow

Dennis Culhane

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Professor and Dana and Andrew Stone Chair in Social Policy

Co-Principal Investigator, Actionable Intelligence for Social Policy

Director of Research, National Center on Homelessness Among Veterans

About

Dennis Culhane is Professor and Dana and Andrew Stone Chair in Social Policy, Co-Principal Investigator of Actionable Intelligence for Social Policy, and Director of Research at the National Center on Homelessness among Veterans. His primary area of research is homelessness and assisted housing policy. His research has contributed to efforts to address the housing and support needs of people experiencing housing emergencies and long-term homelessness. Culhane’s recent research includes studies of vulnerable youth and young adults, including those transitioning from foster care, juvenile justice, and residential treatment services. 

Selected Publications

Culhane, Dennis P. 2016. “The Potential of Linked Administrative Data for Advancing Homelessness Research and Policy." European Journal of Homelessness 10(3): 109-126. 

Culhane, Dennis, Megan Henry, Rian Watt, Lily Rosenthal, Azim Shivji, et al. 2016. “The 2016 Annual Homeless Assessment Report (AHAR) to Congress: Part 1, Point in Time Estimates."

Pleace, N. and D.P. Culhane. 2016. Better than Cure: Testing the Case for Enhancing Prevention of Single Homelessness in England. London: Crisis.

Cameron, Parsell, Maree Petersen, and Dennis P. Culhane. 2016. “Cost Offsets of Supportive Housing: Evidence for Social Work.” British Journal of Social Work 2016: 1-20.

Fantuzzo, John and Dennis P. Culhane. 2015. Actionable Intelligence: Using Integrated Data Systems to Achieve a More Effective, Efficient, and Ethical Government. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.

Faculty Fellow

John DiIulio

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Frederic Fox Leadership Professor of Politics, Religion, and Civil Society

Director, Robert A. Fox Leadership Program

About

John DiIulio is the Frederic Fox Leadership Professor of Politics, Religion, and Civil Society in the Department of Political Science and Director of Penn's Robert A. Fox Leadership Program for undergraduates. Over the last quarter-century, he has won several major academic and teaching awards including the 2010 Ira Abrams Memorial Award and the 2010 Lindback Award for Distinguished Teaching. He has also chaired his academic association's standing committee on professional ethics. Outside academic life, he has developed programs to mentor the children of prisoners, provide literacy training in low-income communities, reduce homicides in high-crime police districts, and support inner-city Catholic schools that serve low-income children. He has been a Research Center Director at the Brookings Institution, the Manhattan Institute, and Public/Private Ventures. During his academic leave in 2001-2002, he served as first Director of the White House Office of Faith-Based and Community Initiatives. He is the author, co-author, and editor of over a dozen books and several hundred articles.

Selected Publications

DiIulio, John. 2014. Bring Back the Bureaucrats. Templeton Press. 

DiIulio, John, James Q. Wilson, and Meena Bose. American Government: Institutions and Policies, 14th edition. Wadsworth-Cengage.

DiIulio, John. 2007. Godly Republic: A Centrist Blueprint for America’s Faith-Based Future. University of California Press.

Faculty Fellow

Richard Gelles

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Former Dean, School of Social Policy & Practice; Joanne and Raymond Welsh Chair of Child Welfare and Family Violence

Director for the Center for Research on Youth and Social Policy, Department of Child Welfare and Family Violence

Co-Director, Field Center for Children's Policy Practice and Research

About

Richard J. Gelles is Joanne and Raymond Welsh Chair of Child Welfare and Family Violence, Director for the Center for Research on Youth and Social Policy, Co-Director of the Field Center for Children’s Policy Practice and Research, and former Dean of the School of Social Policy & Practice. Gelles is an internationally known expert in domestic violence and child welfare and was influential in the passage of the Adoption and Safe Families Act of 1997. Gelles is the author of the highly influential book The Violent Home, which was the first systematic investigation to provide empirical data on domestic violence. His more recent books have also made a significant impact in the study of child welfare and family violence. He is the author of 24 books and more than 100 articles, chapters and papers. 

Selected Publications

Gelles, Richard. 2017. Intimate Violence and Abuse in Families 4th Edition. New York: Oxford University Press.

Gelles, Richard. 2016. “Why the American Child Welfare System is Not Child Centered.” William and Mary Bill of Rights Journal 24: 733-753

Gelles, Richard J. 2011. The Third Lie: Why Government Programs Don’t Work—and a Proposal for One that Would. Philadelphia, PA: University of Pennsylvania Press.

Loseke, Donilene R., Richard J. Gelles, and Mary Cavanaugh. 2005. Current Controversies on Family Violence 2nd edition. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications. 

Gelles, Richard. 1974. The Violent Home: A Study of Physical Aggression Between Husbands and Wives. Beverly Hills, California: Sage Publications, Inc. 

Penn IUR Scholar

Edward Glaeser

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Fred and Eleanor Glimp Professor of Economics, Harvard University

Areas of Interest

    About

    Ed Glaeser is the Fred and Eleanor Glimp Professor of Economics at Harvard, where he also serves as Director of the Taubman Center for State and Local Government and the Rappaport Institute for Greater Boston. He studies the economics of cities, and has written widely on urban issues, including the growth of cities, segregation, crime, and housing markets. He has been particularly interested in the role that geographic proximity can play in creating knowledge and innovation. 

    Selected Publications

    Glaeser, Edward L. "Wealth and the Self-Protection Society." In 100 Years: Leading Economists Predict the Future. Ed. Ignacio Palacios-Huerta. MIT Press, 2014.

    Glaeser, Edward L. "Urban Public Finance." Handbook in Public Economics.Ed. Alan J. Auerbach, Raj Chetty, Martin Feldstein, and Emmanuel Saez. Elsevier B.V., 2013.

    Glaeser, Edward L., Christopher F. Chabris, James J. Lee, Daniel J. Benjamin, Jonathan P. Beauchamp, Gregoire Borst, Steven Pinker, and David I. Laibson. "Why It Is Hard to Find Genes Associated with Social Science Traits: Theoretical and Empirical Considerations." American Journal of Public Health 103.S1 (October 2013): S152-S166.

    Glaeser, Edward L., Steve Poftak, and Kristina Tobio. "What Do Parents Want? An Exploration of School Preferences Expressed by Boston Parents." HKS Faculty Research Working Paper Series RWP13-024, July 2013.

    Glaeser, Edward L. "A World of Cities: The Causes and Consequences of Urbanization in Poorer Countries." National Bureau of Economic Research, December 2013.

    Faculty Fellow

    Andrea Goulet

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    Professor of Romance Languages; Graduate Chair, French; French and Francophone Studies

    About

    Andrea Goulet is Professor of Romance Languages in French and Francophone Studies and Graduate Chair of French in the School of Arts and Sciences. Prior to coming to Penn, she served as Associate Professor of French at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. She is the author of two books on French fiction and literature. Her current research interests include 19th and 20th century French fiction, critical theory, science and literature, detective fiction, and nouveau roman literature. She is currently co-chair of the Nineteenth-Century French Studies Association.

    Selected Publications

    Goulet, Andrea. Forthcoming. "Teaching Les Misérables: Crime and the Popular Press." In MLA Approaches to Teaching Hugo's Les Misérables, edited by Michal Ginsburg and Bradley Stephens.

    Goulet, Andrea. 2016. Legacies of the Rue Morgue: Space and Science in French Crime Fiction. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.

    Goulet, Andrea. 2016. "Du massacre de la rue Transnonain aux 'drames de la rue: Politique et théâtre de l'espace." Romantisme 171(2016): 53-64.

    Goulet, Andrea. 2006. Optiques: The Science of the Eye and the Birth of Modern French Fiction. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.

    Penn IUR Scholar

    Jordan Hyatt

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    Senior Research Associate, Jerry Lee Center of Criminology; Lecturer, Department of Criminology, School of Arts and Sciences, University of Pennsylvania

    Areas of Interest

      About

      Jordan Hyatt is Senior Research Associate of the Jerry Lee Center of Criminology and a Lecturer in the Department of Criminology in the School of Arts and Sciences at the University of Pennsylvania. Previously, he served as a Public Interest Scholar at Villanova University School of Law. His recent research is focused on the integration of offender risk-assessment into sentencing decisions as well as the impact of cognitive behavioral therapy and social networks on high-risk probationers. He also currently works with the Pennsylvania Commission on Sentencing, the First Judicial District Reform Commission, and the Pennsylvania Innocence Project.

      Selected Publications

      Hyatt, J. M. & Barnes, G. C. (2014). The Impact of Intensive Supervision on the Recidivism of High-Risk Probationers. Results from a Randomized Trial.  Forthcoming.

      Barnes, G. C., Hyatt, J. M., Ahlman, L. C., & Kent, D. T. (2012). The Long Term Effects of Low Intensity Supervision for Lower Risk Probationers: Updated Results from a Randomized Controlled Trial. Journal of Criminal Justice, 35(2): 200-220.

      Hyatt, J. M., Chanenson, S. L., & Bergstrom, M. H. (2011). Reform in Motion: The Promise and Perils of Incorporating Risk Assessments and Cost-Benefit Analysis into Pennsylvania Sentencing. Duquesne Law Review, 49(4): 707-749.

      Barnes, G. C., & Hyatt, J. M. (2011). “Randomized Experiments and the Advancement of Criminological Theory.” In J. MacDonald (Ed.), Advances in Criminological Theory, Transaction Publishers: New Brunswick, NJ (Vol. 17).

      Faculty Fellow

      John MacDonald

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      Professor of Criminology and Sociology

      Penny and Robert A. Fox Faculty Director, Fels Institute of Government

      About

      John M. MacDonald is Penny and Robert A. Fox Faculty Director of Penn’s Fels Institute of Government and Professor of Criminology and Sociology in the Department of Criminology in the School of Arts and Sciences. He focuses primarily on the study of interpersonal violence, race, and ethnic disparities in criminal justice, and the effect of public policy responses on crime. His contributions to public policy research include numerous studies using rigorous, quasi-experimental and experimental designs showing the effects of social policies on crime, of institutional social justice reforms on crime, and more recently, the health effects of various policy interventions. He was awarded the Young Experimental Scholar Award by the Academy of Experimental Criminology for significant contributions to experimental research. He also received the David N. Kershaw Award for distinguished contribution to the field of public policy analysis and management from the American Association of Public Policy Analysis and Management. He is an elected Fellow of the Academy of Experimental Criminology. His latest urban research examines the remediating vacant land and abandoned houses on crime.

      Selected Publications

      Ridgeway, Greg and John M MacDonald. 2017. “Effect of Rail Transit on Crime: A Study of Los Angeles from 1988 to 2014.” Journal of Quantitative Criminology 33 (2): 277-291.

      Chirico, Michael, Robert Inman, Charles Loeffler, John MacDonald, and Holger Sieg. 2017 “Procrastination and Property Tax Compliance: Evidence from a Field Experiment.” National Bureau of Economic Research 23243.

      Kondo, MC, SH Han, GH Donovan, and JM MacDonald. 2017. “The association between urban trees and crime: Evidence from the spread of the emerald ash borer in Cincinnati.” Landscape and Urban Planning 157: 193-199

      MacDonald, JM, N Nicosia, and BD Ukert. 2017. “Do Schools Cause Crime in Neighborhoods? Evidence from the Opening of Schools in Philadelphia.” Journal of Quantitative Criminology 1-24.

      Branas, CC, MC Kondo, SM Murphy, EC South, D Polsky, and JM MacDonald. 2016. “Urban blight remediation as a cost-beneficial solution to firearm violence.” American Journal of Public Health 106(12): 2158-2164.

      Faculty Fellow

      Marilyn (Lynn) Sawyer Sommers

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      Professor Emerita of Nursing

      About

      Marilyn (Lynn) Sawyer Sommers is Professor Emerita of Nursing at the School of Nursing. She is known for her expertise in the physiologic basis of critical illness and injury. She studies injury related to sexual assault and risk-taking behaviors in vulnerable populations at risk for health outcomes disparities. Her populations of interest (women, older adolescents, young adults) who live in poverty have poorer health than those who do not, and bear a larger burden of injury. She has been a frequent participant on federal panels related to research on injury and violence. Prior to her academic career, Sommers had fifteen years of experience as a staff nurse, clinical nurse specialist, and nurse administrator in the areas of critical care and trauma. 

      Selected Publications

      Abboud, Sarah, Emily De Penning, Bridgette M. Brawner, Usha Menon, Karen Glanz, and Marilyn S. Sommers. 2017. “Cervical cancer screening among Arab women in the Unites States; An integrative review.” Oncology Nursing Forum 44(1).

      Clark-Cutaia, Maya N., Marilyn S. Sommers, Emily Anderson, Raymond R.Townsend. 2016. “Design of a randomized controlled clinical trial assessing dietary sodium restriction and hemodialysis-related symptom profiles.” Contemporary Clinical Trials Communication 3(15): 70-73.

      Lanier, Yzette, Marilyn S. Sommers, Jason Fletcher, Madeline Y. Sutton, Debra D. Roberts. “Examining Racial Discrimination Frequency, Racial Discrimination Stress, and Psychological Well-Being Among Black Early Adolescents.” Journal of Black Psychology 43(3): 219 – 229.

      George, Maureen, Sarah Abboud, Michael V. Pantalon, Marilyn S. Sommers, Jun Mao, and Cynthia Rand. 2016. “Changes in Clinical Conversations When Providers Are Informed of Asthma Patients’ Beliefs about Medication Use and Integrative Medical Therapies.” Heart and Lung: The Journal of Critical Care 45(1): 70–78. 

      McCulloh Nair, J., L. Nemeth, M.S. Sommers, and S. Newman. 2015. “Substance abuse policy among nursing students: A scoping review.” Journal of Addictions Nursing 26(4): 166-74.

      Faculty Fellow

      Douglas Wiebe

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      Associate Professor of Epidemiology

      About

      Douglas Wiebe is Associate Professor of Epidemiology in the Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology in the Perelman School of Medicine. His research interests include environmental risk factors for injury, the methodologic challenges of activity pattern measurement and exposure measurement, and the impact of daily routines on health-related behavior. A number of his studies examine how keeping a firearm at home relates to homicide, suicide, and unintentional shootings of household members. He also studies issues of the clinical management of trauma and mild traumatic brain injury. One study he leads, funded by the Penn Comprehensive Neuroscience Center, aims to understand the timeline to recovery for children who have sustained a concussion.

      Selected Publications

      Flynn KE, TS Richmond, CC Branas, and DJ Wiebe. 2017. “Neighborhood social trust and youth perceptions of safety during daily activities.” Injury Prevention.

      Kondo, M, CC Branas, TS Richmond, G South, and DJ Wiebe. 2017. “The association between urban tree cover and gun assault: a case-control and case-crossover study.” American Journal of Epidemiology 186(3): 289-296. 

      Morrison, Christopher N, Sara F Jacoby, Beidi Dong, M. Kit Delgado, Douglas J Wiebe. 2017. “Ridesharing and Motor Vehicle Crashes in 4 US Cities: An Interrupted Time-Series Analysis.” American Journal of Epidemiology.

      Beidi Dong, Charles C. Branas, Therese S. Richmond, Christopher N. Morrison, and Douglas J. Wiebe. 2017. “Youth's daily activities and situational triggers of gunshot assault.” Journal of Adolescent Health.

      Affiliated PhD Student

      Alexandra Wimberly

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      PhD Candidate in Social Policy and Practice, University of Pennsylvania

      About

      Alexandra Schepens is a Ph.D. student at the University of Pennsylvania School of Social Policy and Practice. Her research looks at the cross-section of criminal justice and substance use. This work aims to develop substance use interventions for people in the criminal justice system with the goal of decreasing the imprisoned population.

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