People

Penn IUR is affiliated with more than 200 experts in the field of urbanism. Its Faculty Fellows program identifies faculty at the University of Pennsylvania with a demonstrated interest in urban research; the Penn IUR Scholars program identifies urban scholars outside of Penn; and the Penn IUR Fellows program identifies expert urban practitioners. Together, these programs foster a community of scholars and encourage cross-disciplinary collaboration.

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Affiliated PhD Student

Jane Abell

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Doctoral Candidate in Anthropology, University of Pennsylvania

About

Jane Lief Abell is a second year doctoral student in Anthropology at the University of Pennsylvania. Her research explores Islam in the United States, with a particular focus on how race and religion inform relations among "native" and immigrant Muslim groups. Currently, she is working with Al-Bustan Seeds of Culture, an Arabic language and arts organization based in West Philly, and conducting fieldwork in Northeast Philadelphia. Prior to entering graduate school, Jane held several research and editorial positions at the Center for Middle East Studies at Harvard University; Harvard Divinity School; the Berkman Center for Internet & Society; the Consortium on Gender, Security, and Human Rights; and Law People Management, LLC. Jane holds a BA with High Honors in Sociology & Anthropology and Islamic Studies from Swarthmore College. 

 

Faculty Fellow

Phillipe Bourgois

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Richard Perry University Professor of Anthropology and Family and Community Medicine

About

Philippe Bourgois is the Richard Perry University Professor of Anthropology and Family and Community Medicine in the Department of Anthropology, School of Arts and Sciences. He has conducted fieldwork in Central America (Costa Rica, Panama, Nicaragua, El Salvador, and Belize) and in the urban United States (East Harlem in New York and San Francisco). In Central America his research addresses the political mobilization of ethnicity, immigration and labor relations, political violence, popular resistance, and the social dislocation of street children. His research in the United States confronts inner-city social suffering and critiques the political economy and cultural contours of US apartheid. He is also addressing gender power relations, and the intersections between structural and intimate violence. His most recent work focuses on substance abuse, violence, homelessness, and HIV-prevention. He has received numerous academic and grant awards including most recently a John Simon Guggenheim Award (2014).

Selected Publications

Karandinos G, Hart L, Montero Castrillo F, Bourgois P. 2014. Moral Economy of Violence in the U.S. Inner City. Current Anthropology. 55(1): 1–22.

Messac L, Ciccarone D, Draine J and Bourgois P. 2013. The Good-Enough Science-and-Politics of Anthropological Collaboration with Evidence-Based Clinical Research: Four Ethnographic Case Studies. Social Science & Medicine. 99: 176–186.

Philippe I. Bourgois, Jeffrey Schonberg. 2009. Righteous Dopefiend. University of California Press.

Scheper-Hughes, N. and P. Bourgois, eds. 2004. Violence in War and Peace: An Anthology. Oxford: Blackwell Publishing.

Bourgois. P. 2003, second updated edition. In Search of Respect: Selling Crack in El Barrio. New York: Cambridge University Press. 

Faculty Fellow

Kathleen D. Hall

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Associate Professor of Education and Anthropology, Education, Culture, and Society Division

Associate Professor of Education Associated Faculty (secondary appointment)

About

Kathleen D. Hall is Associate Professor of Education and Anthropology in the Education, Culture, and Society Division of the Graduate School of Education with a secondary appointment in the Department of Anthropology. She is a member of the graduate groups in Sociology, Folklore, Social Policy and Practice, and South Asia Studies and is affiliated with the Urban Studies and Asian American Studies programs. She received the Michael Katz Excellence in Teaching Award in the Urban Studies Program in 2001 and the Provost’s Award for Distinguished Ph.D Teaching and Mentoring in 2009. Her research and publications focus on: immigration, citizenship, racial and class inequality, and national incorporation in the United Kingdom and the United States; the politics of knowledge in public sector policy and governance; risk management, human rights, and anti-terrorism law in the United Kingdom; and concepts of "global citizenship" and related efforts to "internationalize" K-16 education in the US and the UK Before joining the GSE faculty in 1995, Hall was a postdoctoral Fellow at Chapin Hall Center for Children at the University of Chicago, where she conducted research on community-based poverty initiatives. 

Selected Publications

Hall, K. D. 2010. Security and the Risk Management State: British Anti-Terrorism Policies After 7/7. In New Ethnographies at the Limits of Neoliberalism, C. Greenhouse, ed. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press. 

Hall, K. D. 2009. British Sikh Lives Lived in Translation. Everyday Life in South Asia, 2nd Edition. Bloomington: University of Indiana Press.

Hall, K. D. 2005. Science, Globalization and Educational Governance: The Political Rationalities of the New Managerialism. The Indiana Journal of Global Legal Studies. Special edition on Globalization and Education 12(1): 153-182.

Hall, K. D. 2004. The Ethnography of Imagined Communities: The Cultural Production of Sikh Ethnicity in Britain. In Being Here and Being There: Fieldwork Encounters and Ethnographic Discoveries,  E. Anderson, S. Brooks, R. Gunn, and N. Jones, eds. The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science [Special Issue]: 595.

Affiliated PhD Student

Shashank Saini

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About

Shashank Saini is a doctoral student of Anthropology at the University of Pennsylvania. His research focuses on understanding violence in the face of rapid  transformations in the political economy of  urban India. Shashank’s dissertation research uses the optic of gendered embodiment, particularly masculinity,  to understand the subject making processes of male youth residing in peri-urban settings in Delhi.
Faculty Fellow

Brian Spooner

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Professor in Anthropology

About

Brian Spooner is a Professor in Anthropology in the Department of Anthropology in the School of Arts and Sciences. He is a social anthropologist who studies the role of cities in the history of globalization.  His major research activities have been in south and central Asia, where he has focused on urban investment in irrigation engineering and, more recently, on the relationship between literacy and the growth and proliferation of cities.  His current project deals with changing modes of social interaction in non-Western global cities. He served as Chair of the Anthropology Group at Penn from 1985-1988 and as Director of the Middle East Center from 1986-1995. Spooner is also the Consulting Editor for Encyclopaedia Iranica at Columbia University.

Selected Publications

Spooner, Brian and William L. Hanaway, eds. 2012. Literacy in the Persianate World: Writing and the Social Order. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.

Hanaway, William L. and Spooner, Brian. 2007. Reading Nasta'liq: Persian and Urdu Hands 1500 to the Present (second edition). Costa Mesa, CA: Mazda Publications.

Spooner, Brian. 1984. Ecology in Development. A Rationale for Three-Dimensional Policy. Tokyo: United Nations University.

Spooner, Brian and H. S. Mann. 1982. Desertification and Development: Dryland Ecology in Social Perspective. London: Academic Press.

Spooner, Brian. 1973. The Cultural Ecology of Pastoral Nomads. Addison-Wesley Modular Publication #45. Reading, Mass.: Addison-Wesley.

Spooner, Brian, ed. 1972. Population Growth: Anthropological Implications. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. 

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