People

Penn IUR is affiliated with more than 200 experts in the field of urbanism. Its Faculty Fellows program identifies faculty at the University of Pennsylvania with a demonstrated interest in urban research; the Penn IUR Scholars program identifies urban scholars outside of Penn; and the Penn IUR Fellows program identifies expert urban practitioners. Together, these programs foster a community of scholars and encourage cross-disciplinary collaboration.

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Affiliated PhD Student

Cameron Anglum

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Doctoral Candidate in Education Policy, University of Pennsylvania

School/Department

Areas of Interest

    About

    Cameron Anglum is a Doctoral Student in Education Policy and a Dean’s Scholar at the Graduate School of Education. He is interested in research centered on domestic urban educational reform in the context of myriad interdependent urban concerns including fiscal policy, spatial analysis, and public-private partnerships, subjects often siloed in public dialogue.

    Formerly of the Penn Institute for Urban Research, Anglum earned a Master’s degree in Education Policy at Penn GSE and a Bachelor’s degree in Economics from Penn’s College of Arts and Sciences. Prior to returning to Penn, he worked in investment management in the portfolio construction space for private and institutional clients.

     

    Faculty Fellow

    Vivian Gadsden

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    William T. Carter Professor of Child Development and Education; Director, National Center on Fathers and Families

    Associate Director, National Center on Adult Literacy

    School/Department

    Areas of Interest

      About

      Vivian Gadsden is the William T. Carter Professor of Child Development and Education, Director of the National Center on Fathers and Families, and Associate Director of the National Center on Adult Literacy at the Graduate School of Education. Her research interests focus on cultural and social factors affecting learning and literacy across the life-course and within families, particularly those at the greatest risk for academic and social vulnerability and her writing focuses on intergenerational learning. Her current projects include a longitudinal study on intergenerational learning within African-American and Latino families; a study of parent engagement in children’s early literacy; a study with young fathers in urban settings; a study on literacy, education, and health; a policy study on incarcerated parents and their families; and a study of children of incarcerated parents. She is participating in an NICHD-funded project (Dr. John Fantuzzo, principal investigator) on the development of an integrated Head Start curriculum.

      Selected Publications

      Gadsden, V. L. and P. Genty, eds. Forthcoming. Incarcerated Parents and Their Children. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.

      Wortham, S. and V.L. Gadsden. 2009. The Complexities of “Similarity” in Research Interviewing. In Investigating Classroom Interaction: Methodologies in Action, K. Kumpulainen and M. Cesar, eds.

      Gadsden, V. L. 2008. The Arts and Education: Knowledge Generation, Pedagogy, and the Discourse of Learning. Review of Research in Education 32: 29-61.

      Faculty Fellow

      Kathleen D. Hall

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      Associate Professor of Education and Anthropology, Education, Culture, and Society Division

      Associate Professor of Education Associated Faculty (secondary appointment)

      About

      Kathleen D. Hall is Associate Professor of Education and Anthropology in the Education, Culture, and Society Division of the Graduate School of Education with a secondary appointment in the Department of Anthropology. She is a member of the graduate groups in Sociology, Folklore, Social Policy and Practice, and South Asia Studies and is affiliated with the Urban Studies and Asian American Studies programs. She received the Michael Katz Excellence in Teaching Award in the Urban Studies Program in 2001 and the Provost’s Award for Distinguished Ph.D Teaching and Mentoring in 2009. Her research and publications focus on: immigration, citizenship, racial and class inequality, and national incorporation in the United Kingdom and the United States; the politics of knowledge in public sector policy and governance; risk management, human rights, and anti-terrorism law in the United Kingdom; and concepts of "global citizenship" and related efforts to "internationalize" K-16 education in the US and the UK Before joining the GSE faculty in 1995, Hall was a postdoctoral Fellow at Chapin Hall Center for Children at the University of Chicago, where she conducted research on community-based poverty initiatives. 

      Selected Publications

      Hall, K. D. 2010. Security and the Risk Management State: British Anti-Terrorism Policies After 7/7. In New Ethnographies at the Limits of Neoliberalism, C. Greenhouse, ed. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press. 

      Hall, K. D. 2009. British Sikh Lives Lived in Translation. Everyday Life in South Asia, 2nd Edition. Bloomington: University of Indiana Press.

      Hall, K. D. 2005. Science, Globalization and Educational Governance: The Political Rationalities of the New Managerialism. The Indiana Journal of Global Legal Studies. Special edition on Globalization and Education 12(1): 153-182.

      Hall, K. D. 2004. The Ethnography of Imagined Communities: The Cultural Production of Sikh Ethnicity in Britain. In Being Here and Being There: Fieldwork Encounters and Ethnographic Discoveries,  E. Anderson, S. Brooks, R. Gunn, and N. Jones, eds. The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science [Special Issue]: 595.

      Penn IUR Scholar

      Shaun R. Harper

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      Executive Director, Southern California Center on Race & Equity

      School/Department

      Areas of Interest

        About

        Shaun R. Harper was Associate Professor and Director of the Center for the Study of Race and Equity in Education in the Higher Education Division of the Graduate School of Education. He now acts as Founding Executive Director for the Southern California Center on Race & Equity. His research examines race and gender in higher education, Black male college access and achievement, and college student engagement. He has published eleven books and more than eighty peer-reviewed journal articles and other academic publications. His research has been praised by the Association for the Study of Higher Education (2008 Early Career Award); the National Association of Student Personnel Administrators (2010 Outstanding Contribution to Research Award, 2012 Robert H. Shaffer Award for Faculty Excellence, and 2013 Pillar of the Profession); and the American Educational Research Association (2010 Division G Early Career Award). He is principal investigator of the New York City Black and Latino Male High School Achievement Study.

        Selected Publications

        Harper, Shaun R and J. Luke Wood. 2014. Advancing Black Male Student Success from Preschool through Ph.D. Stylus Publishing.

        Harper, Shaun R. 2013. Am I My Brother’s Teacher? Black Undergraduates, Peer Pedagogies, and Racial Socialization in Predominantly White Postsecondary Contexts. Review of Research in Education, 37: 183-211.

        Schuh, John H., Susan R. Jones, and Shaun R. Harper. 2011. Student Services: A Handbook for the Profession (5th edition). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

        Harper, Shaun R. 2012. Race without Racism: How Higher Education Researchers Minimize Racist Institutional Norms. The Review of Higher Education, 36(1): 9-29.

        Harper, S. R., and C. H. F. Davis III. 2012. They (Don’t) Care about Education: A Counternarrative on Black Male Students’ Responses to Inequitable Schooling. Educational Foundations, 26(1), 103-120.

        Harper, S. R., and K.A. Griffin. 2011. Opportunity beyond Affirmative Action: How Low-income and Working-class Black Male Achievers Access Highly Selective, High-cost Colleges and Universities. Harvard Journal of African American Public Policy, 17(1): 43-60.

        Affiliated PhD Student

        Elaine Leigh

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        Doctoral Candidate, Graduate School of Education, University of Pennsylvania

        School/Department

        Areas of Interest

          About

          Elaine Leigh is a first-year Ph.D. Student in Higher Education at Penn GSE. Her research interests include college access and success, diversity in higher education, and K-16 state and federal policies impacting educational preparation pipelines. Previously, Elaine was Director of Support Services at Steppingstone Scholars, a Philadelphia nonprofit that prepares educationally underserved students for college and career success. In this role, Elaine developed and led several key initiatives including an annual citywide college conference, two summer academic learning programs, and school-year programming involving tutoring, mentoring, career development, college readiness, and individual college counseling. As a Teach For America alumna, Elaine began her career in education teaching middle school science in the School District of Philadelphia and also served as a college counselor for ASPIRA’s TRIO Talent Search program. Additionally, Elaine stays engaged in the Philadelphia community as a board member for SEAMAAC, an immigrant and refugee social service agency, and has previously served on the boards of PhilaSoup and The Spruce Foundation. A native of Seattle, WA, Elaine holds a B.A. in Psychology from the University of Washington and M.S.Ed. in Urban Education from the University of Pennsylvania.

          Faculty Fellow

          Rebecca A. Maynard

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          University Trustee Professor of Education and Social Policy, Education Policy Division

          School/Department

          Areas of Interest

            About

            Rebecca Maynard is University Trustee Professor of Education and Social Policy in the Education Policy Division of the Graduate School of Education. She is a leading expert in the design and conduct of randomized controlled trials in the areas of education and social policy. She has conducted influential methodological research, recently published open-ware tools to support the efficient design of rigorous impact evaluations, and been a leader in the development and application of methods for conducting systematic reviews of evidence on program effectiveness. She is a Fellow of the American Education Research Association; Past President of the Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management; recipient of the Peter H. Rossi Award for Contributions to the Theory and Practice of Program Evaluation (2009); co-recipient of the Society of Prevention Research Public Service Award (2008); and recipient of the Best Book Award, Society for Research on Adolescents (1998). Her current research projects range from an international comparative study of strategies for preparing secondary school math and science teachers to studies of innovative strategies for preparing low-skilled young adults for the workforce both in the United States and in developing countries. She recently returned to Penn following a two-year leave to serve as Commissioner of the National Center for Education Evaluation and Regional Assistance at the Institute of Education Sciences. 

            Selected Publications

            Nianbo, N. and R. Maynard. 2013. PowerUp!: A Tool for Calculating Minimum Detectable Effect Sizes and Minimum Required Sample Sizes for Experimental and Quasi-Experimental Design Studies. Journal of Research on Educational Effectiveness 6(1): 24-67.

            Hawkinson, L. E., A. Griffen, N. Dong, and R. Maynard. 2012. The Relationship between Child Care Subsidies and Children’s Cognitive Development. Early Childhood Research Quarterly 28(2): 388-404.

            Hoffman, S., and R. Maynard, eds. 2008. Kids Having Kids: Economic Costs and Social Consequences of Teen Pregnancy. Washington, DC: Urban Institute Press.

            Maynard, R., and S. Hoffman. 2008. The Costs of Adolescent Childbearing. In Kids Having Kids: Economic Costs and Social Consequences of Teen Pregnancy, S. Hoffman and R. Maynard, eds. Washington, DC: Urban Institute Press, 359-402.

            Affiliated PhD Student

            Julia McWilliams

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            Doctoral Student, Graduate School of Education, University of Pennsylvania

            School/Department

              About

              Julie McWilliams is a 4th year PhD candidate at UPenn's Graduate School of Education pursuing a joint-degree in education and cultural anthropology. Her research lies at the intersection of urban education reform, race, and immigration. She is currently writing a dissertation about the impact of the school closure policy on the social and organizational dynamics of a neighborhood high school slated for closure in Philadelphia. Alongside her dissertation, she is also studying the effects of education reform in Philadelphia on the academic transitions of recently resettled refugee populations. Prior to graduate school she received a BA in political economy from Princeton University and then spent several years teaching Lao youth in a small Australian college in Vientiane, Laos. 

              Selected Publications

              McWilliams, J. and Bonet, S. (2015) Continuums of Precarity: Refugee Youth in American High Schools. International Journal of Lifelong Education. (in press)

              McWilliams, J. and Bonet, S. (2015) Refugees in the City: The Neighborhood Effects of Institutional Presence and Flexibility. Journal of Immigrant and Refugee Studies. (in press)

              McWilliams, J. (2015) Teaching amidst Precarity: Philadelphia Educators, Neighborhood Schools, and the Public Education Crisis. Workplace: Journal for Academic Labor. (in press)

              McWilliams, J. (2014) Educated for Change? Muslim Refugee Women in the West. Anthropology and Education Quarterly. Vol. 45

              Faculty Fellow

              Laura Perna

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              Professor, Higher Education Division

              About

              Laura Perna is Professor in the Graduate School of Education. The central focus of her scholarship is to understand the forces that limit educational attainment and the ways to promote educational attainment, particularly for students from traditionally underrepresented groups. Perna joined the Penn faculty as Associate Professor in 2005 and was promoted to full Professor in 2010. Her research has been supported by grants from the US Department of Education’s Institute of Education Science, Lumina Foundation for Education, American Educational Research Association, and Association for Institutional Research. She has served as a member of a number of technical review boards, evaluation panels, and advisory boards, and recently completed a three-year term as Vice President of the American Education Research Association (AERA)’s Division J (Postsecondary Education). In 2003, the Association for the Study of Higher Education awarded her the Promising Scholar/Early Career Achievement Award. In 2010 she was awarded the Christian R. and Mary F. Lindback Foundation Award for Distinguished Teaching from Penn, and in 2011 she received the Robert P. Huff Golden Quill Award from the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators.

              Selected Publications

              Perna, L.W., and A. Jones. 2013. The State of College Access and Completion: Improving College Success for Students from Underrepresented Groups. New York, NY: Routledge.

              Perna, L.W., H. May, A. Yee, A., T. Ransom, A. Rodriguez, and R. Fester. Access to the International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma Programme: An Exploration of Opportunity to Rigorous High School Curricula. Educational Policy. (forthcoming).

              Perna, L.W. 2012. Preparing Today’s Students for Tomorrow’s Jobs in Metropolitan America: The Policy, Practice, and Research Issues. Philadelphia, PA: University of Pennsylvania Press.

              Perna, L.W., I. Harkavy, and C. Bowman. 2012. Understanding the Role of Research Universities in Improving College Preparation and Access at Local Urban High Schools. Metropolitan Universities, 22(3): 63-82. 

              Faculty Fellow

              John L. Puckett

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              Professor, Education, Culture, and Society/Education Policy

              School/Department

              Areas of Interest

                About

                John Puckett is Professor of Education, Culture, and Society/Education Policy in the Graduate School of Education. His background includes six years of teaching and administrative work in public and private secondary schools in North Carolina, Georgia, and Florida. Before coming to Penn in 1987, Puckett was Director of Research and Development for REAL Enterprises, a non-profit organization that helped catalyze school-based economic development projects nationwide. He served as Associate Dean of the Graduate School of Education from 1998 to 2004 and again in 2006 to 2007. He currently chairs the School’s Policy, Measurement, and Evaluation Division. Since coming to Penn, he has been actively involved in building University partnerships with West Philadelphia schools; from 1987 to 1991, he worked with Ira Harkavy to develop the University of Pennsylvania’s Center for Community Partnerships, now called the Netter Center. More recently, he has taught in-service courses related to Netter Center projects in West Philadelphia. In conjunction with the Netter Center and the School of Arts and Sciences’ Urban Studies Program, he teaches academically based community service seminars that focus on school- and neighborhood-improvement projects in West Philadelphia. He has also co-authored a number of journal articles and book chapters with Arts and Sciences faculty affiliated with the Netter Center, advancing the development of university-assisted community schools and academically-based community service.

                Selected Publications

                Puckett, J. L., and M. F. Lloyd. Forthcoming. Becoming Penn: The Pragmatic American University, 1950-2000 Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.

                Puckett, J. L., Benson, L., and I. Harkavy. 2007. Dewey’s Dream: Universities and Democracies in an Age of Education Reform. Philadelphia: Temple University Press.

                Puckett, J. L., and M. C. Johanek. 2007. Leonard Covello and the Making of Benjamin Franklin High School: Education as if Citizenship Mattered. Philadelphia: Temple University Press.

                Puckett, J. L. 1989. Foxfire Reconsidered: A Twenty-Year Experiment in Progressive Education. Urbana: University of Illinois Press. 

                Emerging Scholar

                Claire Robertson-Kraft

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                Post-doctoral Fellow and Associate Director, Operation Public Education, The University of Pennsylvania

                School/Department

                Areas of Interest

                  About

                  Claire Robertson-Kraft earned her Ph.D. in education policy and is currently a post-doctoral fellow and the Associate Director of Operation Public Education at The University of Pennsylvania. She is the co-editor of A Grand Bargain for Education Reform: New Rewards and Supports for New Accountability (Harvard Education Press, 2009), which provides a comprehensive framework for evaluating, compensating, and developing teachers. Her research focuses on how these policies influence teachers’ motivation, effectiveness, and retention.

                  After graduating from undergrad at Penn in 2004, Claire worked with Teach For America in Houston, first as a third grade teacher and then as a program director supporting elementary and special education teachers. It was during her time as a classroom teacher that she built the passion she has today for working in urban education. Claire is also very active in the civic community. She is the Co-Founder and current President of PhillyCORE Leaders and serves on the boards of Youth Build Philadelphia, Leadership Philadelphia and WHYY. In 2011, she was selected as one of the New Faces of Philly by Philadelphia Magazine, and in 2013, she received the Forum Award for Emerging Executive Women. 

                  Selected Publications

                  Robertson-Kraft, C. (2014). Teachers’ motivational responses to new evaluation policies. Paper presented at the 2014 Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

                  Robertson-Kraft, C., & Duckworth, A. L. (2014). True grit: Trait-level perseverance and passion for long-term goals predicts effectiveness and retention among novice teachers. Teachers College Record.

                  Cucchiara, M., Rooney, E., & Robertson-Kraft, C. (2013). I’ve never seen people work so hard! Teachers’ working conditions in the early stages of school turnaround.  Urban Education Journal.

                  Robertson-Kraft, C. (2013). Professional unionism: Redefining the role. In M. B. Katz, & M. Rose (Eds.), Public education under siege. Philadelphia, PA: University of Pennsylvania Press. 

                  Hershberg, T., & Robertson-Kraft, C. (Eds.). (2009). A grand bargain for education reform: New rewards and supports for new accountability. Cambridge, MA: Harvard Education Press.

                  Affiliated PhD Student

                  Edward Smith

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                  Doctoral Candidate, Graduate School of Education, University of Pennsylvania

                  About

                  Edward J. Smith is a Ph.D. student at Penn GSE. He previously worked as a Senior Policy Analyst in the Research and Policy Institute at NASPA, an association comprised of 13,000 higher education professionals in all 50 states, eight U.S. Territories, and 25 countries. Ed has also worked as a Research Analyst at the Institute for Higher Education Policy in Washington and taught English for three years at the University of the District of Columbia Community College. His research focuses on building and sustaining education attainment efforts in metropolitan areas, with a particular emphasis on better understanding the effects of municipal, institutional, and community practices and policies on educational outcomes. Ed earned his bachelor’s degree in Economics and master’s degree in College Student Affairs from The Pennsylvania State University.

                  Affiliated PhD Student

                  Kailey Spencer

                  x

                  Doctoral Candidate, Education Policy, Graduate School of Education

                  School/Department

                  Areas of Interest

                    About

                    Kailey Spencer is a PhD candidate in education policy at the University of Pennsylvania, Graduate School of Education. She has broad research interests which span policies and practices that impact public education. Her dissertation research examines student mobility in public schools, with a particular focus on comparing student mobility in traditional public and charter schools. Prior to enrolling at UPenn, Kailey received her BA from Hunter College, of the City University of New York, with concentrations in Social Research in Education and Applied Statistics. 

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