People

Penn IUR is affiliated with more than 200 experts in the field of urbanism. Its Faculty Fellows program identifies faculty at the University of Pennsylvania with a demonstrated interest in urban research; the Penn IUR Scholars program identifies urban scholars outside of Penn; and the Penn IUR Fellows program identifies expert urban practitioners. Together, these programs foster a community of scholars and encourage cross-disciplinary collaboration.

View by:
, ,
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
clear
Affiliated PhD Student

Jane Abell

x

Doctoral Candidate in Anthropology, University of Pennsylvania

About

Jane Lief Abell is a second year doctoral student in Anthropology at the University of Pennsylvania. Her research explores Islam in the United States, with a particular focus on how race and religion inform relations among "native" and immigrant Muslim groups. Currently, she is working with Al-Bustan Seeds of Culture, an Arabic language and arts organization based in West Philly, and conducting fieldwork in Northeast Philadelphia. Prior to entering graduate school, Jane held several research and editorial positions at the Center for Middle East Studies at Harvard University; Harvard Divinity School; the Berkman Center for Internet & Society; the Consortium on Gender, Security, and Human Rights; and Law People Management, LLC. Jane holds a BA with High Honors in Sociology & Anthropology and Islamic Studies from Swarthmore College. 

 

Faculty Fellow

David S. Barnes

x

Director, Health & Societies Program and Associate Professor

About

David Barnes is an Associate Professor and Director of the Health & Societies Program in the Department of History and Sociology of Science in the School of Arts and Sciences, where he teaches the history of medicine and public health. Prior to his time at Penn, Barnes taught for a year at the Institute for Liberal arts at Emory University and for seven years in the History of Science Department at Harvard University. His current research is concentrated in the history of infectious disease, epidemiology, and public health; nineteenth-century urban European social and cultural history; and the politics of international disease control programs. He has a forthcoming book on the history of the Lazaretto Quarantine Station, located outside of Philadelphia.

Selected Publications

Barnes, David. 2006. The Great Stink of Paris and the Nineteenth-Century Struggle against Filth and Germs. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press.

Barnes, David. 2002. Scents and Sensibilities: Disgust and the Meanings of Odors in Late Nineteenth-Century Paris." Historical Reflections/Réflexions historiques, 28 : 21-49.

Barnes, David. 2000. Historical Perspectives on the Etiology of Tuberculosis. Microbes and Infection, 2: 431-440.

Barnes, David. 1995. The Making of a Social Disease: Tuberculosis in Nineteenth-Century France. Berkley, CA: University of California Press.

Faculty Fellow

Phillipe Bourgois

x

Richard Perry University Professor of Anthropology and Family and Community Medicine

About

Philippe Bourgois is the Richard Perry University Professor of Anthropology and Family and Community Medicine in the Department of Anthropology, School of Arts and Sciences. He has conducted fieldwork in Central America (Costa Rica, Panama, Nicaragua, El Salvador, and Belize) and in the urban United States (East Harlem in New York and San Francisco). In Central America his research addresses the political mobilization of ethnicity, immigration and labor relations, political violence, popular resistance, and the social dislocation of street children. His research in the United States confronts inner-city social suffering and critiques the political economy and cultural contours of US apartheid. He is also addressing gender power relations, and the intersections between structural and intimate violence. His most recent work focuses on substance abuse, violence, homelessness, and HIV-prevention. He has received numerous academic and grant awards including most recently a John Simon Guggenheim Award (2014).

Selected Publications

Karandinos G, Hart L, Montero Castrillo F, Bourgois P. 2014. Moral Economy of Violence in the U.S. Inner City. Current Anthropology. 55(1): 1–22.

Messac L, Ciccarone D, Draine J and Bourgois P. 2013. The Good-Enough Science-and-Politics of Anthropological Collaboration with Evidence-Based Clinical Research: Four Ethnographic Case Studies. Social Science & Medicine. 99: 176–186.

Philippe I. Bourgois, Jeffrey Schonberg. 2009. Righteous Dopefiend. University of California Press.

Scheper-Hughes, N. and P. Bourgois, eds. 2004. Violence in War and Peace: An Anthology. Oxford: Blackwell Publishing.

Bourgois. P. 2003, second updated edition. In Search of Respect: Selling Crack in El Barrio. New York: Cambridge University Press. 

Faculty Fellow

David Brownlee

x

Frances Shapiro-Weitzenhoffer Professor, Chair of the Graduate Group in the History of Art

School/Department

Areas of Interest

    About

    David Brownlee is Frances Shapiro-Weitzenhoffer Professor and Chair of the Graduate Group in the History of Art in the School of Arts and Sciences. He is a historian of modern architecture whose interests embrace a wide range of subjects in Europe and America, from the late eighteenth century to the present. Brownlee has won numerous fellowships, and his work has earned three major publication prizes from the Society of Architectural Historians. He is a recipient of the University of Pennsylvania’s Lindback Award for Distinguished Teaching. 

    Selected Publications

    Brownlee, David, and Derek Gillman. 2012. The Barnes Foundation: Two Buildings, One Mission. New York: Skira Rizzoli.

    Brownlee, David, David De Long, and Kathryn Hiesinger. 2001. Out of the Ordinary: Robert Venturi, Denise Scott Brown and Associates: Architecture, Urbanism, Design. Philadelphia: Philadelphia Museum of Art.

    Thomas, George and David Brownlee. 2000. Building America’s First University: An Historical and Architectural Guide to the University of Pennsylvania. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.

    Brownlee, David. 1997. Making a Modern Classic: The Architecture of the Philadelphia Museum of Art. Philadelphia: Philadelphia Museum of Art.

    Brownlee, David B. and David G. De Long. 1991. Louis I. Kahn: In the Realm of Architecture. New York: Rizzoli International Publications.

    Brownlee, David. 1989. Building the City Beautiful: The Benjamin Franklin Parkway and the Philadelphia Museum of Art. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press. 

    Faculty Fellow

    Camille Z. Charles

    x

    Professor of Sociology; Edmund J. and Louise W. Kahn Term Professor in the Social Sciences

    Chair, Department of Africana Studies

    About

    Camille Charles is Professor of Sociology, Edmund J. and Louise W. Kahn Term Professor in the Social Sciences, and Chair of the Department of Africana Studies in the Department of Sociology in the School of Arts and Sciences. Her research interests are in the areas of urban inequality, racial attitudes and intergroup relations, racial residential segregation, minorities in higher education, and racial identity.  Her work has appeared in Social Forces, Social Problems, Social Science Research, The DuBois Review, the American Journal of Education, the Annual Review of Sociology, the Chronicle of Higher Education, and The Root.

    Selected Publications

    Charles, Camille Z., Douglas S. Massey, Mary J. Fischer, and Margarita Mooney, with Brooke A. Cunningham, and Gniesha Y. Dinwiddie. 2009. Taming the River: Negotiating the Academic, Financial and Social Currents in Selective Colleges and Universities. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.

    Bobo, Lawrence D. and Camille Z. Charles. 2008. Race in the American Mind: From the Moynihan Report to the Obama Candidacy. The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Sciences 621: 243-259. Charles, Camille Zubrinsky. 2007. Comfort Zones: Immigration, Acculturation, and the Neighborhood Racial Composition Preferences of Latinos and Asians. Du Bois Review: Social Science Research on Race 4(1): 41-77.

    Charles, Camille Z., Kimberly C. Torres, and Rachelle J. Brunn. 2007. Black Like Who? Exploring the Racial, Ethnic, and Class Diversity of Black Students at Selective Colleges and Universities. In Racism in Post-Race America: New 4 Theories, New Directions, Charles A. Gallagher, ed. Chapel Hill, NC: Social Forces, 247-266.

    Charles, Camille Zubrinsky. 2006. Won’t You Be My Neighbor? Race, Class and Residence in Los Angeles. New York: Russell Sage. 

    Faculty Fellow

    Daniel Aldana Cohen

    x

    Assistant Professor of Sociology, School of Arts and Sciences, University of Pennsylvania

    About

    Daniel Aldana Cohen is Assistant Professor of Sociology at the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Cohen's writing and research are on climate politics. He investigates the intersections of climate change, inequalities of race and social class, and the political projects of both elites and social movements in global cities of the North and South. Cohen's work has been published in Nature, Public Culture, Jacobin, Dissent, Public Books, NACLA Report on the Americas, and elsewhere.

    Affiliated PhD Student

    Lee Ann Custer

    x

    Doctoral Candidate, History of Art, University of Pennsylvania

    About

    Lee Ann Custer is a doctoral student in History of Art at the University of Pennsylvania. Her research interests include the urban vernacular built environment and modern architectural history. Before coming to Penn, Lee Ann worked on a variety of architecture and urban studies initiatives, including the BMW Guggenheim Lab at the Guggenheim Museum and Spontaneous Interventions: Design Actions for the Common Good at the American Pavilion of the 13th Venice Architecture Biennale. Additionally, she has worked for SO – IL architects in New York, as well as for museum planning consultants Lord Cultural Resources. Lee Ann holds a BA in History of Art and Architecture from Harvard University, where she graduated magna cum laude with highest honors. 

    Faculty Fellow

    John DiIulio

    x

    Frederic Fox Leadership Professor of Politics, Religion and Civil Society

    Faculty Director & Co-Chair of the Director's Advisory Group, Robert A. Fox Leadership Program

    About

    John DiIulio is the Frederic Fox Leadership Professor of Politics, Religion and Civil Society in the Department of Political Science and Directs Penn's Fox Leadership Program for undergraduates, as well as its religion research program. Over the last quarter-century, he has won several major academic and teaching awards including the 2010 Ira Abrams Memorial Award and the 2010 Lindback Award for Distinguished Teaching.  He has also chaired his academic association's standing committee on professional ethics. Outside academic life, he has developed programs to mentor the children of prisoners, provide literacy training in low-income communities, reduce homicides in high-crime police districts, and support inner-city Catholic schools that serve low-income children. He has been a research center director at the Brookings Institution, the Manhattan Institute, and Public/Private Ventures. During his academic leave in 2001-2002, he served as first Director of the White House Office of Faith-Based and Community Initiatives. He is the author, co-author, and editor of over a dozen books and several hundred articles.

    Selected Publications

    Wilson, James Q. and John DiIulio. 2013. American Government: Institutions and Policies (13th edition). Cengage Learning.

    DiIulio, John. 2009. Mayberry Machiavellis After All?: Why Judging George W. Bush Is Never as Easy as It Seems. In Judging Bush, Robert Taranto et al., eds. Stanford University Press.

    DiIulio, John. 2009. More Religion, Less Crime?: Science, Felonies, and the Three Faith Factors. Annual Review of Law and Social Science, 5.

    DiIulio, John. 2007. Godly Republic: A Centrist Blueprint for America’s Faith-Based Future. University of California Press.

    Caitlin Gorback

    x

    PhD Candidate, Applied Economics, The Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania

    School/Department

    Areas of Interest

      About

      Caitlin is a fourth year doctoral student in the applied economics PhD program in the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania. Her interests span household and housing finance, real estate economics, and urban economics. Current work includes transportation infrastructure’s impact on commercial and residential rent gradients, how mortgage lenders incorporate neighborhood information updating into lending models, and the implications of young households’ participation in mortgage markets. More generally, she is interested in urban renewal and gentrification, affordable housing, and the demographic drivers of local housing markets. Prior to Wharton, Caitlin earning a B.S. in Economics from Duke University and worked in capital markets research at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York. 

      Faculty Fellow

      Andrea Goulet

      x

      Associate Professor of Romance Languages

      About

      Andrea Goulet is an Associate Professor of Romance Languages in the School of Arts and Sciences. Prior to Penn, she served as Associate Professor of French at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. She is the author of two books on French fiction and literature. Her current research interests include Nineteenth- and twentieth-century French Fiction, critical theory, science and literature, detective fiction, and nouveau roman literature. Her forthcoming book explores scientific discourses in modern French crime fiction. She is currently co-chair of the Nineteenth-Century French Studies Association.

      Selected Publications

      Goulet, Andrea. Forthcoming. Legacies of the Rue Morgue: Space and Science in French Crime Fiction, 1866-2006.

      Goulet, Andrea. 2013. "Natural History and French Culture: Symposium Commentary." In Of Elephants & Roses: French Natural History 1790-1830, Sue Ann Prince, ed. Philadelphia: American Philosophical Society.

      Goulet, Andrea. 2008. Malet’s Maps and Butor’s Bleston: Space and Formal Play in the Roman Policier. L’Esprit Créateur, 48(2): 46-59.

      Goulet, Andrea.2007. Legacies of the Rue Morgue: Street Names and Private/Public Violence in Modern French Crime Fiction. Modern Language Quarterly, 68(1): 87-110.

      Goulet, Andrea. 2006. Optiques: The Science of the Eye and the Birth of Modern French Fiction. Philadelphia: Penn Press.

      Faculty Fellow

      David Grazian

      x

      Associate Professor of Sociology

      About

      David Grazian is Associate Professor of Sociology in the Department of Sociology in the School of Arts and Sciences. His research areas include sociology of culture, popular culture and mass media, urban sociology, symbolic interaction, race and ethnicity, ethnographic methods and social theory. Grazian teaches courses on popular culture, mass media and the arts, cities and urban sociology, social interaction and public behavior, and ethnographic methods. In his research he employs a variety of ethnographic and other qualitative methods to study the production and consumption of commercial entertainment in the urban milieu.. He recently received a fellowship from the Institute for Advanced Studies (IAS) in Princeton, New Jersey to pursue his research full time during the 2013-2014 academic year. During his sabbatical year of residence, Grazian will complete a book manuscript on metropolitan zoos as repositories of culture as well as nature. The book is tentatively titled Where the Wild Things Aren’t: City Zoos and the Culture of Nature.

      Selected Publications

      Grazian, David. 2010. Mix It Up: Popular Culture, Mass Media, and Society. W.W. Norton.

      Grazian, David. 2008. On the Make: The Hustle of Urban Nightlife. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

      Grazian, David. 2003. Blue Chicago: The Search for Authenticity in Urban Blues Clubs. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

      Grazian, David. A Digital Revolution? 2005. A Reassessment of New Media and Cultural Production in the Digital Age. Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science 597: 209-222. 

      Grazian, David. 2004. Opportunities for Ethnography in the Sociology of Music. Poetics: Journal of Empirical Research on Culture, the Media and the Arts 32(3-4): 197-210.

      Faculty Fellow

      Mauro Guillén

      x

      Dr. Felix Zandman Professor of International Management, Director, The Lauder Institute

      Professor Sociology (secondary appointment)

      About

      Mauro Guillén is the Dr. Felix Zandman Professor of International Management and the Director of The Lauder Institute at The Wharton School, and holds a secondary appointment as Professor of Sociology in the Department of Sociology in the School of Arts and Sciences. His research interests include organizational theory, economic sociology, international management, international banking strategies, and emerging economies. He previously taught at the MIT Sloan School of Management. He is a member of the advisory board of the Escuela de Finanzas Aplicadas (Grupo Analistas), and serves on the World Economic Forum’s Global Agenda Council on Emerging Multinationals. He has received a Wharton MBA Core Teaching Award, a Wharton Graduate Association Teaching Award, a Wharton Teaching Commitment and Curricular Innovation Award, the Gulf Publishing Company Best Paper Award of the Academy of Management, the W. Richard Scott Best Paper Award of the American Sociological Association, the Gustavus Myers Center Award for Outstanding Book on Human Rights, and the President’s Book Award of the Social Science History Association. Guillén is an Elected Fellow of the Macro Organizational Behavior Society, a former Guggenheim and Fulbright Fellow, and a Member in the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton. 

      Selected Publications

      Guillén, Mauro F., ed. 2013. Women Entrepreneurs: Inspiring Stories from Emerging Economies and Developing Countries. New York: Routledge. Guillén, Mauro F., and Emilio Ontiveros. 2012. Global Turning Points: Understanding the Challenges for Business in the Twenty-First Century. New York: Cambridge University Press,

      Guillén, Mauro and Esteban Garcia-Canal. 2012. Emerging Markets Rule: Growth Strategies of the New Global Markets. New York: McGraw-Hill.

      Guillén, Mauro and Esteban Garcia-Canal. 2010. The New Multinationals: Spanish Firms in a Global Context. Cambridge University Press. 

      Bring our latest initiatives, publications and events to your inbox.