People

Penn IUR is affiliated with more than 200 experts in the field of urbanism. Its Faculty Fellows program identifies faculty at the University of Pennsylvania with a demonstrated interest in urban research; the Penn IUR Scholars program identifies urban scholars outside of Penn; and the Penn IUR Fellows program identifies expert urban practitioners. Together, these programs foster a community of scholars and encourage cross-disciplinary collaboration.

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Faculty Fellow

Stefan Al

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Professor of Urban Design, University of Pennsylvania

About

Stefan Al is a Dutch architect, Associate Professor of Urban Design at the University of Pennsylvania, and founder of Stefan Al Architects, a firm dedicated to sustainable design. Al has worked as a practicing architect on renowned projects such as the 600-meter tall Canton Tower in Guangzhou, the preservation of world heritage in Latin America at the World Heritage Center of UNESCO, and an 11,000-acre new eco-friendly city in India. He served as an advisor to the Government of Hong Kong’s Harbourfront Commission and Environment Bureau.

Al’s research focuses on urbanization in developing countries and the evolution of urban form. His articles have been published in the Handbook of Architectural Theory, the Berkeley Planning Journal, Urban China, and other publications. He has edited the books Factory Towns of South China and Villages in the City, and is currently writing a book on Las Vegas called The Strip. Prior to joining Penn, Al has taught at UC Berkeley and the University of Hong Kong, where he was the director of the Urban Design Program. 

Selected Publications

Al, Stefan, ed. 2014. Villages in the City: A Guide to South China’s Informal Settlements. University of Hawaii Press; Hong Kong University Press.

Al, Stefan, ed. 2012. Factory Towns of South China: An Illustrated Guidebook. Hong Kong University Press.

Faculty Fellow

Francesca Ammon

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Assistant Professor, City and Regional Planning, PennDesign

About

Francesca Ammon is an historian of the built environment. Her teaching, research, and writing focus on the changing shapes and spaces of the 20th- and 21st-century American city. She grounds her interdisciplinary approach to this subject in the premise that the landscape materializes social relations, cultural values, and economic processes. In particular, Professor Ammon is interested in the ways that visual culture informs planning and design, the dynamic relationships between cities and nature, the politics of place and space, and the roles of business and the state in shaping the physical landscape. Before joining the PennDesign faculty, Professor Ammon was a Visiting Scholar at the American Academy of Arts & Sciences. She has also held the Sally Kress Tompkins Fellowship, jointly sponsored by the Society of Architectural Historians (SAH) and the Historic American Buildings Survey (HABS). While completing her Ph.D. in American Studies, she held long-term fellowships as a Whiting Fellow in the Humanities, Ambrose Monell Foundation Fellow in Technology and Democracy at the Miller Center of Public Affairs, and John E. Rovensky Fellow with the Business History Conference. Professor Ammon is currently a colloquium member of the Penn/Mellon Foundation Humanities + Urbanism + Design Initiative. She is on the board of the Society for American City & Regional Planning History (SACRPH).

Selected Publications

“Post-Industrialization and the City of Consumption: Attempted Revitalization in Asbury Park, New Jersey,” Journal of Urban History 41:2 (March 2015): 158-174.

“Unearthing Benny the Bulldozer: The Culture of Clearance in Postwar Children’s Books,” Technology and Culture 53:2 (April 2012): 306-336.

“Commemoration Amid Criticism: The Mixed Legacy of Urban Renewal in Southwest Washington, D.C.,” Journal of Planning History 8:3 (August 2009): 175-220.

“Refuge, Resort, and Ruin: Real Estate Development and the Identity of Asbury Park, New Jersey,” in Liberty and Leisure in North America, ed. Pierre Lagayette (Paris: Presses de l’Université Paris-Sorbonne, 2008): 41-57.

Faculty Fellow

Daniel Barber

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Assistant Professor and Associate Chair

School/Department

Areas of Interest

    About

    Daniel Barber is an Assistant Professor and Associate Chair of Architecture in the School of Design. He is an architectural historian with a research interest in the relationship between the design fields and the emergence of global environmental culture across the twentieth century. His research looks at the role of architectural technologies in the infrastructural and territorial transformations of the immediate post-World War II period in the United States. Barber’s first book, A House in the Sun: Modern Architecture and Solar Energy in the Cold War, will be published by Oxford University Press in 2015. It documents the brief but dynamic interest in solar houses in the 1940s and 50s; he has also published recently on connections between architectural design methods and climate science. He approaches research and teaching from an interdisciplinary perspective, integrating narratives and methods from histories of technology, science, politics, economics, and environmentalism.

    Selected Publications

    Barber, Daniel. 2014. Tomorrow’s House: Solar Housing in 1940s America. In Technology and Culture (forthcoming)

    Barber, Daniel. 2013. “Visualizing Renewable Resources. In Architecture and Energy: Performance and Style,” 164-180, William Braham and Daniel Willis, eds. New York: Routledge.

    Barber, Daniel. 2013. “Experimental Dwellings: Modern Architecture and Environmental Research at the M.I.T. Solar Energy Fund,” 1938-1963. In A Second Modernism: MIT, Architecture, and the “Techno-Social” Moment, 283-316, Arindam Dutta, ed. Cambridge: MIT Press.

    Barber, Daniel. 2013. The World Solar Energy Project, ca. 1954. Grey Room (Quarterly), 51: 64-93.

    Barber, Daniel. 2011. Making Design Environmental. Pidgin Magazine, 10: 246-259.

    Faculty Fellow

    Jonathan Barnett

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    Professor Emeritus of Practice in City and Regional Planning; Director, Urban Design Program

    About

    Jonathan Barnett is Professor Emeritus of Practice in City and Regional Planning and Director of the Urban Design Program in the School of Design. He is an architect and planner as well as an educator, and is the author of numerous books and articles on the theory and practice of city design. He has been an advisor to the cities of Charleston, SC, Cleveland, Kansas City, Miami, Nashville, New York City, Norfolk, Omaha, and Pittsburgh in the United States, as well as Xiamen and Tianjin in China. He has been the William Henry Bishop visiting professor at Yale, the Eschweiler Professor at the University of Wisconsin, the Kea Distinguished Visiting Professor at the University of Maryland, and the Sam Gibbons Eminent Scholar at the University of South Florida. Jonathan Barnett was awarded the Dale Prize for Excellence in Urban Design and Regional Planning as well as the Athena Medal from the Congress for the New Urbanism.

    Selected Publications

    Barnett, Jonathan. 2011. City Design: Modernist, Traditional, Green, and Systems Perspective.  Routledge, 2011.

    Jonathan. 1995. The Fractured Metropolis: Improving the New City, Restoring the Old City. New York: HarperCollins Publishers

    Barnett, Jonathan. 1986. The Elusive City: Five Centuries of Design, Ambition, and Miscalculation. New York: Harper and Row.

    Barnett, Jonathan. 1982. Introduction to Urban Design. New York: Harper and Row.

    Barnett, Jonathan. 1974. Urban Design as Public Policy. New York: Architectural Records Books. 

    Emerging Scholar

    Seung Ah Byun

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    Senior Planner for Water Resources, Brandywine Conservancy’s Municipal Assistance Program

    About

    Seung Ah Byun is the Senior Planner for Water Resources with the Brandywine Conservancy’s Municipal Assistance Program. Her responsibilities involve developing and managing innovative stormwater management practices, green infrastructure tools, and source water protection projects at the watershed and local scales. She also provides technical expertise to municipalities on compliance with state and federal water quality regulations such as MS4 and TMDL requirements. Previously, Seung Ah was a water resources engineer at CDM Smith, primarily consulting for the City of Philadelphia’s Office of Watersheds and CSO Program.  Seung Ah received her doctorate and a master’s degree from the University of Pennsylvania, School of Design’s Department of City and Regional Planning. She also obtained a master’s degree in environmental engineering from Drexel University and a bachelor’s of science in systems engineering from the University of Pennsylvania. Seung Ah is a licensed Professional Engineer and is a LEED Accredited Professional. 

    Selected Publications

    Byun, Seung Ah. James T. Smullen, Mark Maimone, Robert E. Dickinson, and Christopher S. Crockett. (2003) “Overcoming Obstacles for the Application of SWMM to Large-scale Watersheds.” Practical Modeling of Urban Water Systems, Monograph 11. Edited by James, William. CHI, Guelph, Ontario, Canada.

    Emerging Scholar

    Caroline Cheong

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    Assistant Professor, Department of History, University of Central Florida

    About

    Caroline Cheong is an assistant professor in the History Department at the University of Central Florida. Her research focuses on the relationship between urban heritage conservation and economic development, values-based conservation management, conservation economics and poverty reduction. She earned her PhD from the University of Pennsylvania in City and Regional Planning, her MS in Historic Preservation from the University of Pennsylvania and her BS in Anthropology from the University of Chicago. She was a US/ICOMOS International Exchange Intern in Al Houson, Jordan and a Graduate Intern at the Getty Conservation Institute where she evaluated the challenges and opportunities facing historic cities.  Previously, Caroline was the Director of Research for Heritage Strategies International and PlaceEconomics through which she published numerous research reports and professional publications focusing on the economic impacts of historic preservation with Donovan Rypkema.

    Selected Publications

    Macdonald, Susan and Caroline Cheong. The Role of Public-Private Partnerships in Conserving Heritage Buildings, Sites and Historic Urban Areas: A Literature Review. Los Angeles, CA: Getty Publications, 2014

    Cheong, Caroline. Instruments for urban regeneration: Mixed-capital companies. (2014). Manuscript submitted for publication. Prepared for Eduardo Rojas.

    Cheong, Caroline. Creative Cities and Place. (2013). Manuscript submitted for publication. Prepared for Donovan Rypkema, Erasmus University and the Ministry of Education, Culture and Science of the Netherlands.

    Cheong, Caroline. Cruise Ship Tourism: Issues and Trends. Prepared for the World Monuments Fund for “Harboring Tourism: A Symposium on Cruise Ships in Historic Port Communities,” 2012.

    Affiliated PhD Student

    Laurent Corroyer

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    Doctoral Candidate, City and Regional Planning, School of Design, University of Pennslyvania

    About

    David Stanek is a doctoral student in city and regional planning in the University of Pennslyvania's School of Design.
    Faculty Fellow

    Tom Daniels

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    Professor of City and Regional Planning and Director of the Certificate in Land Preservation Program

    About

    Tom Daniels is Professor of City and Regional Planning and Director of the Certificate in Land Preservation Program in the Department of City and Regional Planning in the School of Design. His main areas of interest are farmland preservation, growth management, and the connection between land use and water quality. Daniels often serves as a consultant to state and local governments and land trusts. He lives in Lancaster, Pennsylvania where for nine years he managed the county’s nationally recognized farmland preservation program. Daniels’ has taught at SUNY-Albany, Kansas State University, and Iowa State University and has served on the Editorial Advisory Board of the Journal of the American Planning Association. In 2002 he was a Senior Fulbright Scholar at the University of New South Wales in Sydney, Australia.

    Selected Publications

    Walker, Doug and Tom Daniels. 2011. The Planners Guide to CommunityViz: The Essential Tool for a New Generation of Planning. American Planning Association.

    Daniels, Tom. 2010. Integrating Forest Carbon Sequestration Into a Cap-and-Trade Program to Reduce Net CO2 Emissions. Journal of the American Planning Association, 76(4).

    Daniels, Tom. 2009. A Trail Across Time: American Environmental Planning from City Beautiful to Sustainability. Journal of the American Planning Association, 75(2).

    Daniels, Tom. 1999. When City and Country Collide: Managing Growth in the Metropolitan Fringe. Washington, DC: Island Press.

    Daniels, Tom and Deborah Bowers. 1997. Holding Our Ground: Protecting America’s Farmland. Washington, DC: Island Press.

    Affiliated PhD Student

    Eliza Davenport Whiteman

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    Doctoral Candidate, City and Regional Planning, University of Pennsylvania

    About

    Eliza is a PhD Student in the City & Regional Planning program at PennDesign. Her research interests focus on issues of food access and food insecurity in urban environments. She uses a mixed-methods approach to explore spatiotemporal dynamics of food and health across the urban planning, public health and social welfare disciplines. She received an MS in Nutrition Policy and an MA in Urban & Environmental Planning from Tufts University and a BA in Sustainable Agriculture from The Evergreen State College. Prior to her doctoral studies, she worked on city food policy issues at the Baltimore Food Policy Initiative, and in Portland, Oregon, where she served on the Portland-Multnomah Food Policy Council and worked at a non-profit food education organization. 

    Selected Publications

    Johnson, M. P., Hollander, J. B., & Whiteman, E. D. (2015). Data and Analytics for Neighborhood Development: Smart Shrinkage Decision Modeling in Baltimore, Maryland. In Planning Support Systems and Smart Cities (pp. 61–76). Springer International Publishing.

    Auerbach, A., McCabe, K., & Whiteman, E. D. (2014). A Health Impact Assessment of the Massachusetts Domestic Workers’ Bill of Rights. Health Resources in Action. 

    Affiliated PhD Student

    Xiaoxia Dong

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    PhD Candidate, City and Regional Planning, University of Pennslyvania

    About

    Xiaoxia Dong is a doctoral student in the Department of City and Regional Planning at PennDesign. His research interest lies in transportation and infrastructure planning. In particular, he is eager to explore how the potential of new transportation technologies and services such as driverless cars and ride-hailing can be maximized to create accessible and sustainable urban environment. Having witnessed the success and failure of many of these emerging technologies and services in China, he also hopes to incorporate an international perspective into his research. His goal is to enable policy makers to make informed decisions when facilitating urban development with respect to new transportation technologies and services. Xiaoxia has a BA degree in Urban Planning from the University of Utah and a Master of City Planning degree from the University of Pennsylvania. He worked as a transportation planner at Fehr and Peers where he participated in multimodal planning, traffic impact studies, master planning, and statistical analyses. He also interned at the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) in Beijing after college where he learned the current sustainability related policies and practices in China.

    Selected Publications

    Dong, Xiaoxia. 2014 “A High Speed Future.” Panorama. University of Pennsylvania, School of Design.

    Dong, Xiaoxia. 2011 “Wisdom of the Businessmen of Chicago” (In Chinese). Peking University Business Review. Peking University.

    Affiliated PhD Student

    Chandan Deuskar

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    PhD Candidate, City and Regional Planning, University of Pennslyvania

    About

    Chandan Deuskar is a doctoral student in city and regional planning at the University of Pennsylvania School of Design. His research interests relate to rapid urbanization in the developing world and its relationship with urban poverty and economic growth, the spatial form of cities, and urban land issues. Between 2011 and 2016, he worked at the World Bank on urban development in Indonesia, Vietnam, Mongolia, Malaysia, Haiti, and Palestine, as well as regional and global studies which used new data and methods to standardize the definition and measurement of urban areas to allow international comparison of urbanization and its impacts. In 2011, Chandan obtained a Masters in City Planning from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where his thesis was on land readjustment as a means of acquiring land for urban expansion in Ahmedabad, India. He also holds a BA in architecture from Columbia University. He grew up in Mumbai, India, and has also lived in Dubai, New York, Boston, and Washington, DC. 

    Selected Publications

    World Bank. "East Asia's Changing Urban Landscape: Measuring a Decade of Spatial Growth." (2015).

    Sanyal, Bishwapriya, and Chandan Deuskar. "A better way to grow? Town planning schemes as a hybrid land readjustment process in Ahmedabad, India." Value capture and land policies 149 (2012): 182.

    Affiliated PhD Student

    Billy Fleming

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    Doctoral Candidate, City and Regional Planning, University of Pennsylvania

    About

    Billy is a doctoral candidate in City Planning with a background in urban design and policy development. He graduated with a Bachelor of Landscape Architecture from the University of Arkansas where also served as the Student Government President during his final year – the first design student to do so in the University’s 140-year history. Upon graduation, he was presented with the Senior Citation Award, which honors the top undergraduate man and woman across the entire campus. Billy then practiced as a landscape architect in the Middle East, specializing in the development of afforestation strategies in water-scarce environments before returning to graduate school at the University of Texas. While there, he served as a research assistant to Dean Fritz Steiner and was presented with the award for the top master’s thesis within the UT School of Architecture. After graduation, Billy worked in the White House Domestic Policy Council during the first term of President Obama’s Administration and his portfolio included the Sustainable Communities Initiative and the America’s Great Outdoors Initiative (National Parks Service). His dissertation work is focused on the nature of climate change adaptation in coastal cities and it is informed greatly by his work and academic experience.

    Selected Publications

    B. Fleming. 2015. Towards a Megaregional Future: Analysing Progress, Assessing Priorities in the US Megaregion Project. In J. Harrison and M. Hoyler (Eds.), Megaregions: Globalization's New Urban Form?, (pp. 200-229). London: Edward Elgar Publishing.

    B. Fleming. 2015. "Can We Rebuild by Design?"LA+, 1(1): 104-111.

    B. Fleming. 2015. "Book Review: Crisis Cities: Disaster and Redevelopment in New York and New Orleans." Journal of the American Planning Association, 84(2): 158-159.

    B. Fleming. 2015 (in-press). "Double-Book Review: The Resilience Dividend: Being Strong in a World Where Things Go Wrong & The Social Roots of Risk: Producing Disasters, Promoting Resilience." Journal of the American Planning Association, 84(4).

    B. Fleming 2016 (in-press). "Lost in Translation: The Authorship Structure and Argumentation of Resilience." Landscape Journal, 35(1).

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