People

Penn IUR is affiliated with more than 200 experts in the field of urbanism. Its Faculty Fellows program identifies faculty at the University of Pennsylvania with a demonstrated interest in urban research; the Penn IUR Scholars program identifies urban scholars outside of Penn; and the Penn IUR Fellows program identifies expert urban practitioners. Together, these programs foster a community of scholars and encourage cross-disciplinary collaboration.

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Faculty Fellow

Jere Behrman

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William R. Kenan, Jr. Professor of Economics

About

Jere R. Behrman is W.R. Kenan Jr. Professor of Economics and Sociology in the School of Arts and Sciences. A leading international researcher in empirical microeconomics with a focus on developing economies, Behrman has been Chair of Economics, Research Associate and Director of Penn’s Population Studies Center, Associate Director of the Lauder Institute, and Associate Director of Penn’s Population Aging Research Center, among other positions in the University. He has been an investigator on over 160 research projects, including 42 National Institutes of Health (NIH) and 14 National Science Foundation (NSF) grants, and has published over 400 articles and 35 books. The unifying dimension of much of this research is to improve empirical knowledge of the determinants of and the impacts of human resources given unobserved factors such as innate health and ability, the functioning of various institutions such as households and imperfect markets, and information imperfections. 

Selected Publications

Behrman, Jere R., Susan W. Parker, Petra E. Todd, and Kenneth I. Wolpin. 2015. "Aligning Learning Incentives of Students and Teachers: Results from a Social Experiment in Mexican High Schools." Journal of Political Economy 123(2): 325-64.

Richter, Linda M., Bernadette Daelmans, Joan Lombardi, Jody Heymann, Florencia Lopez Boo, Jere R. Behrman, Chunling Lu, Jane E. Lucas, Rafael Perez-Escamilla, Tarun Dua, Zulfiqar A. Bhutta, Karin Stenberg, Paul Gertler, and Gary L. Darmstadt. "Investing in the Foundation of Sustainable Development: Pathways to Scale up for Early Childhood Development. 2017. " The Lancet.

Allen, Franklin, Jere R. Behrman, Nancy Birdsall, Shahrokh Fardoust, Dani Rodrik, Andrew Steer, and Arvind Subramanian. 2014. Towards a Better Global Economy: Policy Implications for Global Citizens in the 21st Century. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Almedia, Rita, Jere Behrman, and David Robalino, editors. 2012. The Right Skills for the Job? Rethinking Effective Training Policies for Workers. Washington, DC: Social Protection, Human Development Network, World Bank. 

Faculty Fellow

David Bell

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Xinmei Zhang and Yongge Dai Professor, Professor of Marketing

About

David Bell is Xinmei Zhang and Yongge Dai Professor and Professor of Marketing in the Marketing Department at The Wharton School. His current research focuses on the digital economy and success factors for Internet retail startups. Prior work in traditional retail settings explores unplanned and impulse buying, and consumer response to fixed and variable shopping costs. His articles have been published leading journals including Journal of Consumer Research, Journal of Marketing, Journal of Marketing Research, Management Science, and Marketing Science.

Selected Publications

Bell, David R., Santiago Gallino and Antonio Moreno. 2017 (forthcoming). “Revenge of the Store.” MIT Sloan Management Review. 

Li, Kathleen and David Bell. 2017. “Estimation of average treatment effects with panel data: Asymptotic theory and implementation.” Journal of Econometrics 197: 65-75.

Bell, David Bell. 2014. Location Is (Still) Everything: The Surprising Influence of the Real World on How We Search, Shop, and Sell in the Virtual One. Boston New Harvest, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt.

Lee, Jae Young and David Bell. 2013. “Neighborhood Social Capital and Social Learning for Experience Attributes of Products.” Marketing Science 32(6): 960-976.

Bell, David, JeongHye Choi, Leonard Lodish. 2012. “What Matters Most in Internet Retailing.” MIT Sloan Management Review 54: 27-33.

 

Faculty Fellow

Lawrence Brown

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Miers Busch Professor of Statistics

About

Lawrence Brown is the Miers Busch Professor of Statistics in the Department of Statistics at The Wharton School. His research areas include statistical decision theory, statistical inference, nonparametric function estimation, foundations of statistics, sampling theory, and empirical queuing science.

Selected Publications

Brown, Lawrence D., National Research Council (U.S.) Panel on the Design of the 2010 Census Program of Evaluations and Experiments. 2010. Envisioning the 2020 Census. Washington, DC: National Academies Press.

Brown, L. D., T. J. Plewes, and M. A. Gerstein. 2005. Measuring Research and Development in the United States Economy. Washington, DC: National Academies Press.

Brown, L. D., N. Gans, A. Mandelbaum, A. Sakov, H. Shen, S. Zeltyn, and L. H. Zhao. 2005. “Statistical Analysis of a Telephone Call Center: a Queuing Science Perspective.” Journal of American Statistical Association 100.

Brown, L. D., T. T. Cai, and A. DasGupta. 1999. “Interval Estimation for a Binomial Proportion.” Statistical Science 16.

Brown, L. D. and M. G. Low. 1996. “Asymptotic Equivalence of Nonparametric Regression and White Noise.” Annals of Statistics 24.

Affiliated PhD Student

Matt Davis

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PhD Candidate, Applied Economics, The Wharton School, University of Pennsylania

About

Matt begun his PhD training in Applied Economics in 2013. He earned his undergraduate degree in Economics from Princeton University in 2009 and subsequently worked as a research analyst at the Environmental Defense Fund and the Education Innovation Lab at Harvard University.  He is currently working on projects related to the distributional impact of the mortgage interest tax deduction and the consequences of housing cycles for school district finances.

Selected Publications

"No Excuses" Charter Schools and College Enrollment: New Evidence From a High-School Network in Chicago (with Blake Heller). Forthcoming, Education Finance and Policy.

Faculty Fellow

Gilles Duranton

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Dean's Chair in Real Estate Professor; Department Chair

About

Gilles Duranton is Professor of Real Estate in the Real Estate Department at The Wharton School. His research focuses on urban and regional development, transportation, and local public finance. Prior to joining the Real Estate Department in 2012, Duranton taught at the University of Toronto for seven years, and the London School of Economics for nine years. He is the co-editor of the Journal of Urban Economics, and is an editorial board member for several other journals. He is also affiliated with the Centre for Economic Policy Research in London, the Spatial Economics Research Centre at the London School of Economics, and the Rimini Centre for Economic Analysis. He currently serves as the Chair of the Real Estate department at The Wharton School.

Selected Publications

Duranton, Gilles. 2016. “Determinants of city growth in Colombia.” Papers in Regional Science 95(1): 101-132.

Duranton, Gilles. 2016. “Agglomeration effects in Colombia.” Journal of Regional Science 56(2): 210-238.

Duranton, Gilles. 2015. “Roads and Trade in Colombia.” Economics of Transportation 4(1): 16-36.

Duranton, Gilles. 2015. “Growing through cities in developing countries.” World Bank Research Observer 30(1): 39-73.

Faculty Fellow

Fernando Ferreira

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Associate Professor, Departments of Real Estate, and Business Economics and Public Policy

About

Fernando Ferreira is Associate Professor of Real Estate and Business Economics and Public Policy. His interests include public economics, urban economics, and real estate. He is also a Faculty Fellow and Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER), for which he co-edits the Journal of Public Economics. Ferreira has served as a visiting scholar at the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia and the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, and is the recipient of various research grants, including from the Ford Foundation and the U.S. Department of Education. 

Selected Publications

Ferreira, Fernando “What Drives Racial and Ethnic Differences in High Cost Mortgages? The Role of High Risk Lenders”, with Patrick Bayer and Stephen Ross. Forthcoming. Review of Financial Studies.

Ferreira, Fernando, Patrick Bayer, and Stephen Ross. 2016. “The Vulnerability of Minority Homeowners in the Housing Boom and Bust.” American Economic Journal: Economic Policy 8(1).

Ferreira, Fernando and Joseph Gyourko. 2014. “Does Gender Matter for Political Leadership? The Case of U.S. Mayors.” Journal of Public Economics 112: 24-39.

Ferreira, Fernando, Leah Platt Boustan, Hernan Winkler, and Eric Zolt. 2013. “The Effect of Rising Income Inequality on Taxation and Public Expenditures: Evidence from U.S. Municipalities and School Districts, 1970-2000.” Review of Economics and Statistics 95(4): 1291-1302.

Affiliated PhD Student

Ari Friedman

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MD/PhD Candidate in Health Economics, University of Pennsylvania

About

Ari B. Friedman is a Fellow at the Leonard Davis Institute and a sixth-year M.D./Ph.D. student in health economics at the University of Pennsylvania's Perelman School of Medicine and the Wharton School. His research interests include the industrial organization of the unscheduled care system (primary care clinics, urgent care and retail clinics, and emergency departments), access to care and insurance, and financially integrating population health into the medical system. His work has been cited more than 600 times, with an h-index of 8.

Selected Publications

Friedman AB. Comment on Economic Incentives and Use of the Intensive Care Unit. JAMA 2014. 311(22):2336-2337.

Rhodes KV, Kenney GM, Friedman AB, Saloner B, Lawson CC, Chearo D, Wissoker D, Polsky D. Primary Care Access for New Patients on the Eve of Health Care Reform. JAMA Int Med 2014.

Becker NV, Friedman AB. Emergency Department, Heal Thyself. Am J Emerg Med 2014. 32(2):175-177.

Friedman AB, Mendola T. To Cover Their Child, One Couple Navigates A Health Insurance Maze In Pennsylvania. Health Affairs2013. 32(5):994-997.

Friedman AB, Becker N. Understanding the Individual Mandate's SCOTUS Pivot Points. LDI Health Economist. April 2012.VIDEO

Faculty Fellow

Edward George

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Universal Furniture Professor of Statistics

About

Edward George is Universal Furniture Professor of Statistics at The Wharton School. His research interests include hierarchical modeling, model uncertainty, shrinkage estimation, treed modeling, variable selection, and wavelet regression. He is a member of a number of professional organizations, including American Statistical Association (Elected Fellow), Bernoulli Society, Institute of Mathematical Statistics (Elected Fellow), Royal Statistical Society (Fellow), International Statistical Institute (Elected Member), International Society for Bayesian Analysis, Japanese Association of Financial Econometrics and Engineering American Statistical Association (Elected Fellow), Bernoulli Society, Institute of Mathematical Statistics (Elected Fellow), Royal Statistical Society (Fellow), International Statistical Institute (Elected Member), International Society for Bayesian Analysis, and the Japanese Association of Financial Econometrics and Engineering.

Selected Publications

Ročková, Veronika and Edward I. George. 2016. “The Spike-and-Slab LASSO.” Journal of the American Statistical Association, December.

Ročková, Veronika and Edward I. George. 2016. “Fast Bayesian Factor Analysis via Automatic Rotations to Sparsity.” Journal of the American Statistical Association 111(516).

Ročková, Veronika and Edward I. George. 2014. “EMVS: The EM Approach to Bayesian Variable Selection.” Journal of the American Statistical Association 109(506): 828-846.

Faculty Fellow

Mauro Guillén

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Dr. Felix Zandman Professor of International Management

Director, Lauder Institute

About

Mauro Guillén is the Dr. Felix Zandman Professor of International Management and Director of The Lauder Institute at The Wharton School. His research interests include organizational theory, economic sociology, international management, international banking strategies, and emerging economies. He previously taught at the MIT Sloan School of Management. He is a member of the advisory board of the Escuela de Finanzas Aplicadas (Grupo Analistas), and serves on the World Economic Forum’s Global Agenda Council on Emerging Multinationals. He has received a Wharton MBA Core Teaching Award, a Wharton Graduate Association Teaching Award, a Wharton Teaching Commitment and Curricular Innovation Award, the Gulf Publishing Company Best Paper Award of the Academy of Management, the W. Richard Scott Best Paper Award of the American Sociological Association, the Gustavus Myers Center Award for Outstanding Book on Human Rights, and the President’s Book Award of the Social Science History Association. Guillén is an Elected Fellow of the Macro Organizational Behavior Society, a former Guggenheim and Fulbright Fellow, and a Member in the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton. 

Selected Publications

Guillen, Mauro. 2016. The Architecture of Collapse: The Global System in the 21st Century. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016.

Berges, Angel, Mauro Guillen, Juan Pedro Moreno, and Emilio Ontiveros. 2014. A New Era in Banking: The Landscape after the Battle. Brookline, MA: Bibliomotion.

Guillen, Mauro and Laurence Capron. 2015. “State Capacity, Minority Shareholder Protections, and Stock Market Development.” Administrative Science Quarterly 61(1):125-160.

Heather Berry, Mauro Guillen, and Arun S. Hendi. 2014. “Is there Convergence across Countries? A Spatial Approach.” Journal of International Business Studies 45: 387-404.

Guillen, Mauro, editor. 2013. Women Entrepreneurs: Inspiring Stories from Developing Countries and Emerging Economies. New York: Routledge.

Faculty Fellow

Joseph Gyourko

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Martin Bucksbaum Professor of Real Estate, Finance, and Business and Public Policy

Nancy Nasher and David Haemiseggar Director, Zell/Lurie Real Estate Center

About

Joe Gyourko is the Martin Bucksbaum Professor of Real Estate, Finance and Business & Public Policy at The Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. He also serves as the Nancy Nasher and David Haemiseggar Director of the Zell/Lurie Real Estate Center at Wharton. Professor Gyourko’s research interests include real estate finance and investments, urban economics, and housing markets, in the United States and China. He is a Research Associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) and served as Co-Director of the special NBER Project on Housing Markets and the Financial Crisis. Professor Gyourko served as co-editor of the Journal of Urban Economics, is a past Trustee of the Urban Land Institute (ULI) and Director of the Pension Real Estate Association (PREA), and consults to various private firms on real estate investment and policy matters. He received his B.A. from Duke University and a Ph.D. in Economics from the University of Chicago.

Selected Publications

Gyourko, Joseph and Edward Glaeser. Forthcoming. “The Economics of Housing Supply.” Journal of Economic Perspectives.

Wu, Jing, Joseph Gyourko, and Yongheng Deng. 2016. “Evaluating the Risk of Chinese Housing Markets: What We Know and What We Need to Know.” China Economic Review 39: 91-114.

Gyourko, Joseph and Raven Molloy. 2015. “Regulation and Housing Supply.” In Handbook of Regional and Urban Economics Vol 5A, edited by Gilles Duranton, J. Vernon Henderson, and William Strange. Amsterdam, The Netherlands: Elsevier.

Gyourko, Joseph, Chris Mayer, and Todd Sinai. 2013. “Superstar Cities.” American Economic Journal-Economic Policy 5(4): 167-199.

Faculty Fellow

Jessie Handbury

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Assistant Professor of Real Estate

About

Jessie Handbury is Assistant Professor of Real Estate at The Wharton School and a Faculty Research Fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER). Her research interests lie at the intersection of urban economics, trade, and industrial organization. Her recent articles use detailed data on retail sales to characterize how product prices and availability vary across U.S. cities and to measure the implications of this variation on household living costs. Her current research examines spatial and socio-economic disparities in the availability and consumption of food products. This work, supported by the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the Wharton Social Impact Initiative, seeks to understand the roles that differentials in price sensitivity, nutritional preferences, and retail access each play in explaining socio-economic disparities in nutrition. 

Selected Publications

Handbury, Jessie, Ilya Rahkovsky, and Molly Schnell2015. “What Drives Nutritional Disparities? Retail Access and Food Purchases Across the Socioeconomic Spectrum.” NBER Working Paper Series Volume w21126.

Handbury, Jessie, and David E. Weinstein. 2014. “Goods prices and availability in cities.” The Review of Economic Studies 82(1): 258-296.

Handbury, Jessie. 2014. “Are poor cities cheap for everyone? Non-homotheticity and the cost of living across us cities." Zell-Lurie working papers.

 

Faculty Fellow

Robert P. Inman

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Richard King Mellon Professor of Finance

Professor of Business Economics and Public Policy

Professor of Real Estate

School/Department

Areas of Interest

    About

    Robert P. Inman is the Richard King Mellon Professor of Finance, Professor of Business Economics and Public Policy, and Professor of Real Estate at the Wharton School. His primary research interests include public finance, urban fiscal policy, and political economy. He is a Research Associate for the National Bureau of Economic Research and a Visiting Senior Research Economist for the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia. He has advised the City of Philadelphia, the State of Pennsylvania, U.S. Treasury, U.S. Department of Education, U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, Republic of South Africa, National Bank of Sri Lanka, and others on matters of fiscal policy. 

    Selected Publications

    Carlino, Gerald and Robert P Inman. 2016. “Fiscal Stimulus in Economic Unions: What Role for States?” Tax Policy and the Economy 30(1).

    Inman, Robert P. and Daniel L. Rubinfeld. 2013. “Understanding the Democratic Transition in South Africa.” American Law and Economics Review 15(1): 1-38.

    Inman, Robert, ed. 2009. Making Cities Work: Prospects and Policies for Urban America. Princeton: Princeton University Press.

    Inman, Robert P. 2008. “Federalism’s Values and the Value of Federalism.” NBER Working Paper No. 13735.

    Craig, Steven, Andrew Haughwout, Robert P. Inman, and Thomas Luce. 2004. “Local Revenue Hills: Evidence from Four U.S. Cities.” The Review of Economics and Statistics 86(2): 570-585.  

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