People

Penn IUR is affiliated with more than 200 experts in the field of urbanism. Its Faculty Fellows program identifies faculty at the University of Pennsylvania with a demonstrated interest in urban research; the Penn IUR Scholars program identifies urban scholars outside of Penn; and the Penn IUR Fellows program identifies expert urban practitioners. Together, these programs foster a community of scholars and encourage cross-disciplinary collaboration.

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Penn IUR Scholar

Scott Gabriel Knowles

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Associate Professor, Interim Department Head for History, Department of History and Politics

Director, Great Works Symposium, Drexel University

Areas of Interest

    About

    Scott Gabriel Knowles is Associate Professor and Interim Department Head for History in the Department of History and Politics at Drexel University. His current research focuses on mitigating disaster risk in modern cities through technology and public policy, a topic on which he has written extensively. Knowles is also a Research Fellow with the Disaster Research Center at the University of Delaware and member of the Fukushima Forum collaborative research community. Additionally, he serves on Philadelphia Mayor Michael A. Nutter’s Special Advisory Commission on Licenses and Inspections.

     

    Selected Publications

    Knowles, Scott Gabriel. 2011. The Disaster Experts: Mastering Risk in Modern America. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.

    Knowles, Scott Gabriel, ed. 2009. Imagining Philadelphia: Edmund Bacon and the Future of the City. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.

    Knowles, Scott Gabriel. 2007. Defending Philadelphia: A Historical Case Study of Civil Defense in the Early Cold War. Public Works Management and Policy, January: 1-16.

    Knowles, Scott Gabriel. 2003. Lessons in the Rubble: The World Trade Center and the History of Disaster Investigations in the United States. History and Technology, Spring: 9-28.

    Kargon, Robert H. and Scott Gabriel Knowles. 2202. Knowledge for Use: Science, Higher Education, and America’s New Industrial Heartland, 1880-1915. Annals of Science, January: 1-20.

     

    Faculty Fellow

    David Leatherbarrow

    x

    Professor and Chair of the Graduate Group in Architecture

    School/Department

    Areas of Interest

      About

      David Leatherbarrow is Professor of Architecture and Chair of the Graduate Group in Architecture in the Department of Architecture in the School of Design. He teaches courses in architectural theory and design studios in the graduate and undergraduate programs, supervises research, and directs the Ph.D. program. His primary research interests include history and theory of architecture and the city. Prior to coming to Penn, Leatherbarrow taught theory and design at the Polytechnic of Central London and Cambridge University, England. He is the recipient of the Visiting Scholar Fellowship from the Canadian Center of Architecture (1997-98). 

       

      Selected Publications

      Leatherbarrow, David. 2004. Topographical Stories: Studies in Landscape and Architecture. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.

      Leatherbarrow, David. 2002. Uncommon Ground: Architecture, Technology, Topography. Cambridge: MIT Press.

      Leatherbarrow, David. 1993. Roots of Architectural Invention: Site, Enclosure, Materials. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.

      Mostafavi, Moshen, and David Leatherbarrow. 1993. On Weathering: The Life of Buildings in Time. Cambridge: MIT Press.

       

      Faculty Fellow

      Lynn Hollen Lees

      x

      Professor of History Emeritus

      About

      Lynn Hollen Lees is Professor of History Emeritus, having retired in 2013 from her position as Vice Provost for Faculty after serving for several years as co-director of the Joseph H. Lauder Institute of Management and International Studies. Her teaching was primarily in the fields of British history, European social history, and world history. She has spent time as an exchange Professor at University College London, Catholic University of Leuven, and the University of Diponegoro in Indonesia, and was Chair of the Department of History between 1995 and 2001. Her research centers on European cities, their social organization, and their welfare institutions. 

       

      Selected Publications

      Crossley, Pamela K., Lynn Hollen Lees, and John W. Servos. 2012. Global Society: The World Since 1900, 3rd edition. Cengage Learning.

      Lees, Lynn Hollen. 2008. The Solidarities of Strangers: The British Poor Laws and the People, 1700-1948. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

      Lees, Lynn Hollen and Andrew Lees. 2007. Cities and the Making of Modern Europe, 1750-1914. Cambridge University Press.

      Lees, Lynn Hollen and Paul Hohenberg. 1995. The Making of Urban Europe, 1000-1995. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. 

      Lees, Lynn Hollen. 1979. Exiles of Erin: Irish Migrants in Victorian London. Manchester: Manchester University Press. 

       

      Faculty Fellow

      Walter Licht

      x

      Walter H. Annenberg Professor of History

      About

      Walter Licht is Walter H. Annenberg Professor of History in the School of Arts and Sciences. His expertise lies in the history of work and labor markets and he teaches courses in American economic and labor history. Licht began teaching at Penn in 1977. He has received the Ira Abrams Memorial Prize for Distinguished Teaching awarded by the School of Arts and Sciences and many grants and fellowships to pursue his scholarly interests. He has previously been Undergraduate Chair of the Department of History, Graduate Chair, and Chair. He also served as Associate Dean in the School of Arts and Sciences for ten years, responsible for graduate education, social science departments, area studies programs, and research and education centers. He is currently Faculty Director of Civic House and the Penn Civic Scholars Program. Licht is now working on a book entitled American Capitalisms: A Global History.

       

      Selected Publications

      Dublin, Thomas and Walter Licht. 2005. The Face of Decline: The Pennsylvania Anthracite Region in the Twentieth Century. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press.

      Licht, Walter. 1995. Industrializing America: The Nineteenth Century. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press.

      Licht, Walter. 1992. Getting Work: Philadelphia, 1840-1950. Cambridge: Harvard University Press.

      Scranton, Phillip and Walter Licht. 1986. Work Sights: Industrial Philadelphia, 1890-1950. Philadelphia: Temple University Press.

      Licht, Walter. 1983. Working For The Railroad: The Organization of Work in the Nineteenth Century. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.

       

      Faculty Fellow

      Randall Mason

      x

      Associate Professor and Chair, Department of Historic Preservation

      School/Department

      Areas of Interest

        About

        Randall Mason is Associate Professor and Chair of the Department of Historic Preservation in the School of Design. His courses focus on historic preservation planning, urban conservation, history, and cultural landscape studies. Mason’s research interests include theory and methods of preservation planning, cultural policy, the economics of preservation, historic site management, the history and design of memorials, and the history of historic preservation. He leads the Center for Research on Preservation and Society, which undertakes applied research projects on site management and on social, economic and political aspects of historic preservation. Before joining the Penn faculty in 2004, Mason worked as Senior Project Specialist at the Getty Conservation Institute, researching economic and social issues relating to heritage conservation. Previous positions include Assistant Professor and Director of Historic Preservation at the University of Maryland, and adjunct faculty in landscape architecture at RISD. His professional experience includes several years of consulting practice and co-founding the nonprofit research group Minerva Partners (which develops projects to strengthen the connections between heritage conservation and social development). He serves on the Board of Directors of the Preservation Alliance of Greater Philadelphia, and was the 2012-13 National Endowment for the Arts Rome Prize winner at the American Academy in Rome.

         

        Selected Publications

        Mason, Randall. 2012. “Broadway as a Memory Site.” In The Greatest Grid: The Master Plan of Manhattan, 1811-2011, edited by Hilary Ballon. New York City: Columbia University Press.

        Mason, Randall. 2009. The Once and Future New York: Historic Preservation and the Modern City. University of Minnesota Press.

        Page, Max and Randall Mason, eds. 2004. Giving Preservation a History: Histories of Historic Preservation in the United States. Routlege.

         

        Affiliated PhD Student

        Samuel Ostroff

        x

        Joint Doctoral Candidate in History and South Asia Studies, University of Pennsylvania

        About

        Samuel Ostroff is a joint Doctoral Candidate in History and South Asia Studies at Penn. He is currently writing his dissertation on the economic, environmental and imperial aspects of the Indian Ocean pearl trade in the late seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. In the field of urban studies, his work focuses on port-cities and urban networking across oceanic and global spaces in the early modern world. Aside from his dissertation research, Samuel is interested in urban planning, transportation, and policy in the global cities of the 21st century. Prior to Penn, Samuel completed his B.A. in History at Bucknell University and M.A. in Middle East and Asian Languages and Cultures at Columbia University.

         

        Faculty Fellow

        Wendell Pritchett

        x

        Provost, University of Pennsylvania

        Presidential Professor of Law and Education

        School/Department

        Areas of Interest

          About

          Wendell Pritchett is Penn’s Provost and Presidential Professor in the Law School and the Graduate School of Education. He began his tenure as Penn’s 30th Provost on July 1, 2017. An award-winning scholar, author, lawyer, professor, and civic and academic leader, he first joined the Penn Law faculty in 2002, serving as Interim Dean from 2014-15 and as Associate Dean for Academic Affairs from 2006-07. He served from 2009-14 as Chancellor of Rutgers University-Camden, leading unprecedented growth that included graduating classes of record sizes, the first campus doctoral programs, and new health education and science facilities. In the City of Philadelphia, he has been Deputy Chief of Staff and Director of Policy for Mayor Michael Nutter, Chair of the Redevelopment Authority, member of the School Reform Commission, President of the Philadelphia Housing Development Corporation, Board Chair of the Community Legal Services of Philadelphia, and Executive Director of the district offices of Congressman Thomas Foglietta, among many other board and leadership positions. He has served as President of the Coalition of Urban and Metropolitan Universities, a board member of the Campaign for Black Male Achievement, Co-Chair of Mayor Nutter’s Transition Committee, and Co-Chair of Barack Obama’s Urban Policy Task Force. His research examines the development of post-war urban policy, in particular urban renewal, housing finance, and housing discrimination. 

           

          Selected Publications

          Pritchett, Wendell, Jessie Brown, and Martin Kurzweil. 2017. “Quality Assurance in U.S. Higher Education: The Current Landscape and Principles for Reform” Ithaka S+R and Penn Program on Regulation.

          Petrilla, John, Barbara Cohn, Wendell Pritchett, Paul Stiles, Victoria Stodden, Jeffrey Vagle, Mark Humowiecki, and Nastassia Rosario. 2017. “Legal Issues for IDS Use: Finding a Way Forward.” Actionable Intelligence for Social Policy.

          Pritchett, Wendell. 2008. Robert Clifton Weaver and the American City: The Life and Times of an Urban Reformer. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

          Pritchett, Wendell and Mark Rose, guest editors. 2008. “Politics and the American City, 1940-1990.” Journal of Urban History 34.

          Pritchett, Wendell. 2002. Brownsville, Brooklyn: Blacks, Jews and the Changing Face of the Ghetto. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

           

          Faculty Fellow

          Simon Richter

          x

          Professor of German and Dutch Literature and Culture, Department of Romance Languages, School of Arts and Sciences

          About

          Simon Richter is Professor of German and Dutch literature and culture in the School of Arts and Sciences and the Director of Penn in Berlin and Rotterdam. Simon is broadly interested in the cultural history of water management and responses to flooding and sea level rise. His current research is focused on the cultural translation of sustainability, cultural dimensions of the Energy Transition in Germany, and intercultural aspects of the Dutch “international water ambition” in the United States and Indonesia.

           

          Selected Publications

          “Goethe’s Faust and the Ecolinguistics of ‘Here,’” in German Ecocriticism, ed. Caroline Schaumann and Heather Sullivan (NY: Palgrave, 2017).

          “Betting on Water: The Hydrological Moment in Goethe’s Faust,” in Design in the Terrain of Water, ed. Anuradha Mathur and Dilip da Cunha (San Francisco: APD / ORO Editions, 2014).

           

          Emerging Scholar

          Moritz Schularick

          x

          Professor of Economics and Economic History, University of Bonn

          Areas of Interest

            About

            Moritz Schularick is Professor of Economics and Economic History at the University of Bonn and a Research Fellow of the Centre for Economic Policy Research in London and the CESifo Research Network. In 2015/16, he held the Alfred-Grosser-Chair at SciencesPo in Paris. Previously, Schularick taught at the Free University of Berlin and was a visiting professor at New York University and the University of Cambridge. Working at the intersection of macroeconomics, international economics and economic history, his research has been published in the American Economic Review, the Journal of Monetary Economics, the Journal of International Economics, the Review of Economics and Statistics, the Journal of Economic History, and several other journals. My research is currently supported by grants from the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research, VolkswagenStiftung, Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft and the Institute for New Economic Thinking.

            Affiliated PhD Student

            Sudev Sheth

            x

            PhD Candidate in South Asia Studies and History, University of Pennsylvania

            About

            Sudev J Sheth is a doctoral student in the Departments of South Asia Studies and History at the University of Pennsylvania. His dissertation titled A historical ethnography of statecraft and governance in Baroda, c. 1700−1949 investigates connections between agrarian economies, finance capital, and provincial state building in western India during the dissolution of the Mughal Empire and the rise of British colonial rule. Sudev also researches historical transformations in boundary and land use in the urban villages of contemporary New Delhi.

             

            Faculty Fellow

            Brian Spooner

            x

            Professor in Anthropology

            Penn Museum Curator for Near Eastern Ethnology

            About

            Brian Spooner is a Professor in the Department of Anthropology in the School of Arts and Sciences, and Curator for Near Eastern Ethnology in the Penn Museum. He is a social anthropologist who studies the role of cities in the history of globalization, with special reference to the Middle East and Central Asia. His major research activities have been in Afghanistan, Iran, and Pakistan, where he has focused on urban investment in irrigation engineering and, more recently, on the relationship between literacy and the growth and proliferation of cities. His current project deals with changing modes of social interaction in non-Western global cities. He served as Chair of the Anthropology Graduate Group at Penn from 1985-1988, as Director of the Middle East Center from 1986-1995, as Co-Director of the Lauder Institute 2010-2012, and as Chair of the Undergraduate Program in Anthropology from 2014-2017. Spooner is also the Consulting Editor for Encyclopaedia Iranica at Columbia University.

             

            Selected Publications

            Spooner, Brian, ed. 2015. Globalization: The Crucial Phase. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.

            Spooner, Brian. 2013. “Investment and Translocality. Recontextualizing the Baloch in Islamic and Global History.” In Crossroads Asia Working Paper Series No. 14.

            Spooner, Brian and Harold F. Schiffman, eds. 2012. Language Policy and Language Conflict in Afghanistan and Its Neighbors. Leiden: Brill.

            Spooner, Brian and William L. Hanaway, eds. 2012. Literacy in the Persianate World: Writing and the Social Order. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2012.

            Spooner, Brian and William L. Hanaway. 2007. Reading Nasta’liq: Persian and Urdu Hands 1500 to the Present, 2nd edition. Costa Mesa CA: Mazda Publications. 

             

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