People

Penn IUR is affiliated with more than 200 experts in the field of urbanism. Its Faculty Fellows program identifies faculty at the University of Pennsylvania with a demonstrated interest in urban research; the Penn IUR Scholars program identifies urban scholars outside of Penn; and the Penn IUR Fellows program identifies expert urban practitioners. Together, these programs foster a community of scholars and encourage cross-disciplinary collaboration.

View by:
, ,
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
clear
Faculty Fellow

Simon Richter

x

Professor of German and Dutch Literature and Culture, Department of Romance Languages, School of Arts and Sciences

About

Simon Richter is Professor of German and Dutch literature and culture in the School of Arts and Sciences and the Director of Penn in Berlin and Rotterdam. Simon is broadly interested in the cultural history of water management and responses to flooding and sea level rise. His current research is focused on the cultural translation of sustainability, cultural dimensions of the Energy Transition in Germany, and intercultural aspects of the Dutch “international water ambition” in the United States and Indonesia.

 

Selected Publications

“Goethe’s Faust and the Ecolinguistics of ‘Here,’” in German Ecocriticism, ed. Caroline Schaumann and Heather Sullivan (NY: Palgrave, 2017).

“Betting on Water: The Hydrological Moment in Goethe’s Faust,” in Design in the Terrain of Water, ed. Anuradha Mathur and Dilip da Cunha (San Francisco: APD / ORO Editions, 2014).

 

Affiliated PhD Student

Shashank Saini

x

About

Shashank Saini is a doctoral student of Anthropology at the University of Pennsylvania. His research focuses on understanding violence in the face of rapid  transformations in the political economy of  urban India. Shashank’s dissertation research uses the optic of gendered embodiment, particularly masculinity,  to understand the subject making processes of male youth residing in peri-urban settings in Delhi.

Faculty Fellow

Heather Sharkey

x

Professor in the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations (NELC)

About

Heather J. Sharkey is Professor in the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations in the School of Arts and Sciences. She received her Ph.D. in History from Princeton University after conducting research abroad on a Fulbright-Hays fellowship. Before joining the Penn faculty in 2002, she taught at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), and Trinity College in Connecticut. In 2011 she won the Charles Ludwig Distinguished Teaching Award from the School of Arts and Sciences of the University of Pennsylvania. During the 2012-13 year, she was a Visiting Professor at the École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales (EHESS) in Paris.

 

Selected Publications

Sharkey, Heather. 2017. A History of Muslims, Christians and Jews in the Middle East. Cambridge University Press.

Sharkey, Heather. 2013. Cultural Conversions: Unexpected Consequences of Christian Missions in the Middle East, Africa and South Asia. Syracuse University Press.

Sharkey, Heather and Mehmet Ali Doğan, eds. 2011. American Missionaries and the Middle East: Foundational Encounters. University of Utah Press.  

Sharkey, Heather. 2008. American Evangelicals in Egypt: Missionary Encounters in an Age of Empire. Princeton University Press.

Sharkey, Heather. 2003. Living with Colonialism: Nationalism and Culture in the Anglo-Egyptian Sudan. University of California Press. 

 

Affiliated PhD Student

Sudev Sheth

x

PhD Candidate in South Asia Studies and History, University of Pennsylvania

About

Sudev J Sheth is a doctoral student in the Departments of South Asia Studies and History at the University of Pennsylvania. His dissertation titled A historical ethnography of statecraft and governance in Baroda, c. 1700−1949 investigates connections between agrarian economies, finance capital, and provincial state building in western India during the dissolution of the Mughal Empire and the rise of British colonial rule. Sudev also researches historical transformations in boundary and land use in the urban villages of contemporary New Delhi.

 

Faculty Fellow

Brian Spooner

x

Professor in Anthropology

Penn Museum Curator for Near Eastern Ethnology

About

Brian Spooner is a Professor in the Department of Anthropology in the School of Arts and Sciences, and Curator for Near Eastern Ethnology in the Penn Museum. He is a social anthropologist who studies the role of cities in the history of globalization, with special reference to the Middle East and Central Asia. His major research activities have been in Afghanistan, Iran, and Pakistan, where he has focused on urban investment in irrigation engineering and, more recently, on the relationship between literacy and the growth and proliferation of cities. His current project deals with changing modes of social interaction in non-Western global cities. He served as Chair of the Anthropology Graduate Group at Penn from 1985-1988, as Director of the Middle East Center from 1986-1995, as Co-Director of the Lauder Institute 2010-2012, and as Chair of the Undergraduate Program in Anthropology from 2014-2017. Spooner is also the Consulting Editor for Encyclopaedia Iranica at Columbia University.

 

Selected Publications

Spooner, Brian, ed. 2015. Globalization: The Crucial Phase. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.

Spooner, Brian. 2013. “Investment and Translocality. Recontextualizing the Baloch in Islamic and Global History.” In Crossroads Asia Working Paper Series No. 14.

Spooner, Brian and Harold F. Schiffman, eds. 2012. Language Policy and Language Conflict in Afghanistan and Its Neighbors. Leiden: Brill.

Spooner, Brian and William L. Hanaway, eds. 2012. Literacy in the Persianate World: Writing and the Social Order. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2012.

Spooner, Brian and William L. Hanaway. 2007. Reading Nasta’liq: Persian and Urdu Hands 1500 to the Present, 2nd edition. Costa Mesa CA: Mazda Publications. 

 

Faculty Fellow

Nancy Steinhardt

x

Professor of East Asian Art

Penn Museum Curator of Chinese Art

About

Nancy Steinhardt is Professor of East Asian Art, Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations and Curator of Chinese Art at the Penn Museum. She received her PhD. at Harvard in 1981 and was a Junior Fellow at Harvard from 1978-81. Steinhardt taught at Bryn Mawr from 1981-1982 before coming to Penn in 1982. Her research focuses on the art, architecture, and archaeology of China, Korea, and Japan from the 2nd through the 14th centuries; she has done fieldwork in all three countries. Steinhardt is particularly interested in how Chinese art is borrowed, adopted, adapted, and reinterpreted at China’s borders. Her current research projects are “The Borders of Chinese Architecture” and “Chinese Architecture under Mongolian Rule.”

 

Selected Publications

Steinhardt, Nancy, editor, with Xinian Fu, author, and Alexandra Harrer, translator. 2017. Chinese Architecture: Twelve Lectures. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.

Steinhardt, Nancy. 2015. China’s Early Mosques. Edinburgh University Press.

Steinhardt, Nancy.2014. Chinese Architecture in an Age of Turmoil, 200-600. University of Hawaiʻi Press.

Steinhardt, Nancy, Jeffrey W. Cody, and Tony Atkin, eds. 2011. Chinese Architecture and the Beaux-Arts. University of Hawaiʻi Press.

 

Bring our latest initiatives, publications and events to your inbox.