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Faculty Fellow

Lawrence Brown

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Miers Busch Professor of Statistics

About

Lawrence Brown is the Miers Busch Professor of Statistics in the Department of Statistics at The Wharton School. His research areas include statistical decision theory, statistical inference, nonparametric function estimation, foundations of statistics, sampling theory, and empirical queuing science.

 

Selected Publications

Brown, Lawrence D., National Research Council (U.S.) Panel on the Design of the 2010 Census Program of Evaluations and Experiments. 2010. Envisioning the 2020 Census. Washington, DC: National Academies Press.

Brown, L. D., T. J. Plewes, and M. A. Gerstein. 2005. Measuring Research and Development in the United States Economy. Washington, DC: National Academies Press.

Brown, L. D., N. Gans, A. Mandelbaum, A. Sakov, H. Shen, S. Zeltyn, and L. H. Zhao. 2005. “Statistical Analysis of a Telephone Call Center: a Queuing Science Perspective.” Journal of American Statistical Association 100.

Brown, L. D., T. T. Cai, and A. DasGupta. 1999. “Interval Estimation for a Binomial Proportion.” Statistical Science 16.

Brown, L. D. and M. G. Low. 1996. “Asymptotic Equivalence of Nonparametric Regression and White Noise.” Annals of Statistics 24.

 

Fellow

Brian English

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Director, Office of Program Innovation, Global Communities (formerly CHF International)

About

Brian English is an urban planner that works at the intersections of sustainability, technology and economics.

Brian is the Director of Program Innovation for Global Communities (formerly CHF International), an international development organization in Washington DC. For the past 10 years, Brian has managed inter-disciplinary teams on urban development projects in Asia, Africa, the Middle East, and the Caribbean. From 2009-2011, Brian was Country Director for CHF International in India and directed a $6 million program called SCALE-UP funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation to reduce urban poverty. After Hurricane Ivan in 2004, Brian managed community revitalization programs in the Eastern Caribbean for the Unites States Agency for International Development. Brian has consulted on a broad range of development projects including special economic zones, innovations clusters, and city master plans.

Brian’s work has been featured in New York Times, Scientific American, Business Week and Harvard Business Review. Brian was an Aspen Scholar at the 2012 Aspen Ideas Festival and presented at a TEDx on Forces of Change in June, 2012. In 2014, Brian was selected as a Resident Fellow by Rockefeller Foundation at their Bellagio Center in Italy.

 

Penn IUR Scholar

Richard Florida

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Director of Business and Creativity, The Martin Prosperity Institute, Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto

Global Research Professor, New York University

Areas of Interest

    About

    Richard Florida is Director of the Martin Prosperity Institute at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management and a Global Research Professor at New York University. He previously taught at Carnegie Mellon University and George Mason University.  Florida is one of the world’s leading public intellectuals on economic competitiveness, demographic trends, and cultural and technological innovation. He is also Senior Editor at The Atlantic, where he co-founded and serves as Editor-at-Large for The Atlantic Cities, as well as the Creative Class Group. He is the author of several best-selling books including his award-winning book The Rise of the Creative Class.

     

    Selected Publications

    Florida, Richard. 2017. The New Urban Crisis: How Our Cities Are Increasing Inequality, Deepening Segregation, and Failing the Middle Class—and What We Can Do About It. New York: Basic Books. 

    Florida, Richard. 2010. The Great Reset: How the Post-Crash Economy Will Change the Way We Live and Work. New York: HarperCollins.

    Florida, Richard. 2009. Who’s Your City?: How the Creative Economy Is Making Where to Live the Most Important Decision of Your Life. New York: Basic Books.

    Florida, Richard. 2005. The Flight of the Creative Class: The New Global Competition for Talent. New York: HarperCollins.

    Florida, Richard. 2002. The Rise of the Creative Class. New York: Basic Books.

     

    Faculty Fellow

    Kenneth Foster

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    Professor of Bioengineering

    About

    Kenneth R. Foster is Professor of Bioengineering in the School of Engineering and Applied Science. His research interests relate to biomedical applications of nonionizing radiation from audio through microwave frequency ranges, and health and safety aspects of electromagnetic fields as they interact with the body. Foster examines the prospects of workers in electrical occupations and the controversy related to possible cancer risk from electromagnetic field exposure. He has written also on the broader topic of technological risk, and impact of technology (principally, electrotechnologies) on humans. His goal in this area is to examine technology, putting into perspective its relative risks and benefits to society. What he hopes to impart is a better perception of the social use of science.

     

    Selected Publications

    Foster, K.R. and J. E. Moulder. 2017. “Will an MRI Examination Damage Your Genes?” Radiation Research 187(1).

    Foster, K.R. and D. J. Callans, 2017. “Smartphone apps meet evidence based medicine.” IEEE Pulse (April/May).

    Foster, K.R.  2017. “Radiofrequency Fields and the Precautionary Principle.” In Non-ionizing Radiation Protection: Summary of Research and Policy Options, edited by A.W. Wood and K. Karipisis, 405-429. Wiley.

    Foster, K.R. 2016. “3-Dimensional Printing in Medicine: Hype, Hope, and The Challenge of Personalized Medicine.” In Philosophy and Engineering: Exploring Boundaries, Expanding Connections, edited by Byron Newberry, Diane Michelfelder, and Qin Zhu, 211-228. New York City: Springer.

    Foster, K.R. 2015. “Biological Effects of Radiofrequency Energy As Related to Health and Safety.” In Wiley Encyclopedia of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, 2nd Edition, edited by John Webster. Wiley. 

     

    Faculty Fellow

    Edward George

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    Universal Furniture Professor of Statistics

    About

    Edward George is Universal Furniture Professor of Statistics at The Wharton School. His research interests include hierarchical modeling, model uncertainty, shrinkage estimation, treed modeling, variable selection, and wavelet regression. He is a member of a number of professional organizations, including American Statistical Association (Elected Fellow), Bernoulli Society, Institute of Mathematical Statistics (Elected Fellow), Royal Statistical Society (Fellow), International Statistical Institute (Elected Member), International Society for Bayesian Analysis, Japanese Association of Financial Econometrics and Engineering American Statistical Association (Elected Fellow), Bernoulli Society, Institute of Mathematical Statistics (Elected Fellow), Royal Statistical Society (Fellow), International Statistical Institute (Elected Member), International Society for Bayesian Analysis, and the Japanese Association of Financial Econometrics and Engineering.

     

    Selected Publications

    Ročková, Veronika and Edward I. George. 2016. “The Spike-and-Slab LASSO.” Journal of the American Statistical Association, December.

    Ročková, Veronika and Edward I. George. 2016. “Fast Bayesian Factor Analysis via Automatic Rotations to Sparsity.” Journal of the American Statistical Association 111(516).

    Ročková, Veronika and Edward I. George. 2014. “EMVS: The EM Approach to Bayesian Variable Selection.” Journal of the American Statistical Association 109(506): 828-846.

     

    Penn IUR Scholar

    Scott Gabriel Knowles

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    Associate Professor, Interim Department Head for History, Department of History and Politics

    Director, Great Works Symposium, Drexel University

    Areas of Interest

      About

      Scott Gabriel Knowles is Associate Professor and Interim Department Head for History in the Department of History and Politics at Drexel University. His current research focuses on mitigating disaster risk in modern cities through technology and public policy, a topic on which he has written extensively. Knowles is also a Research Fellow with the Disaster Research Center at the University of Delaware and member of the Fukushima Forum collaborative research community. Additionally, he serves on Philadelphia Mayor Michael A. Nutter’s Special Advisory Commission on Licenses and Inspections.

       

      Selected Publications

      Knowles, Scott Gabriel. 2011. The Disaster Experts: Mastering Risk in Modern America. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.

      Knowles, Scott Gabriel, ed. 2009. Imagining Philadelphia: Edmund Bacon and the Future of the City. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.

      Knowles, Scott Gabriel. 2007. Defending Philadelphia: A Historical Case Study of Civil Defense in the Early Cold War. Public Works Management and Policy, January: 1-16.

      Knowles, Scott Gabriel. 2003. Lessons in the Rubble: The World Trade Center and the History of Disaster Investigations in the United States. History and Technology, Spring: 9-28.

      Kargon, Robert H. and Scott Gabriel Knowles. 2202. Knowledge for Use: Science, Higher Education, and America’s New Industrial Heartland, 1880-1915. Annals of Science, January: 1-20.

       

      Faculty Fellow

      Vijay Kumar

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      Nemirovsky Family Dean of Penn Engineering, School of Engineering, University of Pennsylvania

      About

      Vijay Kumar is the Nemirovsky Family Dean of Penn Engineering with appointments in the Departments of Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics, Computer and Information Science, and Electrical and Systems Engineering at the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Kumar received his Bachelor of Technology degree from the Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur and his Ph.D. from The Ohio State University in 1987. He has been on the Faculty in the Department of Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics with a secondary appointment in the Department of Computer and Information Science at the University of Pennsylvania since 1987. Dr. Kumar served as the Deputy Dean for Research in the School of Engineering and Applied Science from 2000-2004. He directed the GRASP Laboratory, a multidisciplinary robotics and perception laboratory, from 1998-2004. He was the Chairman of the Department of Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics from 2005-2008. He served as the Deputy Dean for Education in the  School of Engineering and Applied Science from 2008-2012. He then served as the assistant director of robotics and cyber physical systems at the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (2012 – 2013). Dr. Kumar is a Fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (2003), a Fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers(2005) and a member of the National Academy of Engineering (2013). Dr. Kumar’s research interests are in robotics, specifically multi-robot systems, and micro aerial vehicles. He has served on the editorial boards of the IEEE Transactions on Robotics and Automation, IEEE Transactions on Automation Science and Engineering, ASME Journal of Mechanical Design, the ASME Journal of Mechanisms and Robotics and the Springer Tract in Advanced Robotics (STAR). He currently serves as Editor of the ASME Journal of Mechanisms and Robotics and as Advisory Board Member of the AAAS Science Robotics Journal. He is the recipient of the 1991 National Science Foundation Presidential Young Investigator award, the 1996 Lindback Award for Distinguished Teaching (University of Pennsylvania), the 1997 Freudenstein Award for significant accomplishments in mechanisms and robotics, the 2012 ASME Mechanisms and Robotics Award, the 2012 IEEE Robotics and Automation Society Distinguished Service Award, a 2012 World Technology Network (wtn.net) award, a 2014 Engelberger Robotics Award and the 2017 IEEE Robotics and Automation Society George Saridis Leadership Award in Robotics and Automation.  He has won best paper awards at DARS 2002, ICRA 2004, ICRA 2011, RSS 2011, and RSS 2013, and has advised doctoral students who have won Best Student Paper Awards at ICRA 2008, RSS 2009, and DARS 2010.

       

      Selected Publications

      Ehsani and Das, “Yield estimation in citrus with SUAVs,” Citrus Extension Trade Journals, pp. 16-18, 2016. 

      Concha, Loianno, Kumar, and Civera, “Visual-inertial direct SLAM,” in 2016 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA), 2016, pp. 1331-1338. 

      Wong, Steager, and Kumar, “Independent Control of Identical Magnetic Robots in a Plane,” IEEE Robotics and Automation Letters, vol. 1, iss. 1, pp. 554-561, 2016. 

      Hunter, Chodosh, Steager, and Kumar, “Control of microstructures propelled via bacterial baths,” in 2016 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA), 2016, pp. 1693-1700. 

      Kessens, Thomas, Desai, and Kumar, “Versatile Aerial Grasping Using Self-Sealing Suction,” in IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, Stockholm, 2016. 
       

       

      Fellow

      Daniel Lee

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      Executive Vice President, Samsung Electronics; Visiting Professor, Cornell Tech

      About

      Daniel Lee is the Executive Vice President of Samsung Electronics, and Visiting Professor at Cornell Tech. He is formerly the UPS Foundation Chair Professor in the School of Engineering and Applied Science. He received his B.A. summa cum laude in Physics from Harvard University and his Ph.D. in Condensed Matter Physics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1995.  Before coming to Penn, he was a researcher at AT&T and Lucent Bell Laboratories in the Theoretical Physics and Biological Computation departments.  He is a Fellow of the IEEE and AAAI and has received the National Science Foundation CAREER award and the University of Pennsylvania Lindback award for distinguished teaching.   He was also a fellow of the Hebrew University Institute of Advanced Studies in Jerusalem, an affiliate of the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, and organized the US-Japan National Academy of Engineering Frontiers of Engineering symposium.  As director of the GRASP Laboratory and founding co-director of the CMU-Penn University Transportation Center, his group focuses on understanding general computational principles in biological systems, and on applying that knowledge to build autonomous systems.

       

       

      Selected Publications

      Khan, Arbaaz, Clark Zhang, Nikolay Atanasov, Konstantinos Karydis, Vijay Kumar, Daniel D. Lee. 2017. “Memory Augmented Control Networks.” arXiv.

      Khan, Arbaaz, Clark Zhang, Nikolay Atanasov, Konstantinos Karydis, Daniel D. Lee, Vijay Kumar. 2017. “End-to-End Navigation in Unknown Environments using Neural Networks.” arXiv.

      McGill, Stephen G, Seung‐Joon Yi, Hak Yi, Min Sung Ahn, Sanghyun Cho, Kevin Liu, Daniel Sun, Bhoram Lee, Heejin Jeong, Jinwook Huh, Dennis Hong, and Daniel D Lee. 2017. “Team THOR’s Entry in the DARPA Robotics Challenge Finals 2015.” Journal of Field Robotics 34(4): 775-801.

      Huh, Jinwook, Bhoram Lee, and Daniel D Lee. 2017. “Adaptive motion planning with high-dimensional mixture models.” Robotics and Automation (ICRA), 2017 IEEE International Conference.

       

      Faculty Fellow

      Megan Ryerson

      x

      Assistant Professor of City and Regional Planning and Electrical and Systems Engineering

      About

      Megan Ryerson is an Assistant Professor in the Departments of City and Regional Planning and Electrical and Systems Engineering at the University of Pennsylvania. She is the Research Director of the Mobility21 Transportation Research Center, a national University Transportation Center (UTC) and a Senior Fellow at the Center for Injury Research and Prevention at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. Through Mobility21, supported by a five-year transportation research grant from the U.S. Department of Transportation, Dr. Ryerson and her team are committed to examining cross-disciplinary problems such as autonomous vehicles, intercity transportation planning, and pedestrian and bicycle safety to improve accessibility and mobility for specific populations. Dr. Ryerson’s major contributions are in the field of transportation infrastructure planning and demand forecasting. Her work has investigated how airports compete for air service across megaregions, how airlines can reconfigure their disaster planning to achieve more resilient outcomes, and how flights can be planned more proactive to reduce fuel consumption. Dr. Ryerson is a member of the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation State Transportation Innovation Council, the Board of Advisors for the Eno Center for Transportation, the Women’s Transportation Seminar Philadelphia Chapter, and she was appointed by the U.S. Secretary of Transportation and the Governor of Pennsylvania to aviation-related advisory committees. In 2015 Dr. Ryerson was named “Woman of the Year” by the Women’s Transportation Seminar-Philadelphia Chapter.

       

      Selected Publications

      Ryerson, M.S. 2017 (in press). “Diversion Ahead: Modeling the Factors Driving Diversion Airport Choice After an Unexpected Airport Outage.” Journal of Infrastructure Systems.

      Suh, D., M.S. Ryerson. 2017.” Adaptive Airport Planning Frameworks and Techniques for a New Era of Planning.” Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board 2603: 1–15. 

      Ryerson, M.S. 2016. “Incentivize It and They Will Come? How Some of the Busiest U.S. Airports are Building Air Service with Incentive Programs.” Journal of the American Planning Association 82(4): 303-315.

      Ryerson, M.S., Woodburn, A. 2014. “Build Capacity or Manage Demand: Can regional planners lead American aviation into a new frontier of demand management?” Journal of the American Planning Association 80(2): 138-152. 

       

      Faculty Fellow

      Saswati Sarkar

      x

      Professor

      About

      Saswati Sarkar is Professor in the Department of Electrical and Systems Engineering in the School of Engineering and Applied Science. Her research interests are in the science and economics of various classes of networks – for example, communication, social, transportation, power, and economic networks – with an emphasis on pricing and market economics, security, resource allocation, optimization and control of stochastic systems, distributed systems, and algorithms as well as sustainable development. She is currently serving as an Associate Editor of IEEE/ACM Transactions on Networking. She received the National Science Foundation (NSF) Faculty Early Career Development Award in 2003.

       

      Selected Publications

      Ghosh, Arnob, Saswati Sarkar, Randall Berry. 2017. “The Value of Side-Information in Secondary Spectrum Markets.” IEEE Journal on Selected Areas in Communications 35(1).

      Bera, Susanta, Moumita Pal, Saswati Sarkar, and Sunirmal Jana. 2017. “Hierarchically Structured Macro with Nested Mesoporous Zinc Indium Oxide Conducting Film.” ACS Applied Material Interfaces 9(5): 4420–4424.

      Lotfi, Mohammad Hassan, Karthikeyan Sundaresan, Saswati Sarkar, Mohammad Ali Khojastepour. 2017. “Economics of Quality Sponsored Data in Non-Neutral Networks.” IEEE/ACM Transactions on Networking 25(4).

      Khouzani, M. H. R., Saswati Sarkar, and Eitan Altman. 2012. “Optimal Dissemination of Security Patches in Mobile Wireless Networks.” IEEE Transactions on Information Theory 58(7): 4714-4732.

       

      Faculty Fellow

      Tony Smith

      x

      Professor of Systems Engineering and Regional Science

      About

      Tony Smith is Professor of Systems Engineering and Regional Science, Department of Electrical and Systems Engineering. His primary area of research is in the theory and application of probabilistic models to spatial interaction behavior. Specific interests focus on structural analysis and axiomatic foundations of such models. Related areas of interest are in probabilistic theories of choice behavior, spatial statistical analysis and GIS. A secondary area of research is in transportation and land use modeling.

       

      Selected Publications

      Hillier, Amy, Tony Smith, Eliza D. Whiteman, and Benjamin W. Chrisinger. 2017. “Discrete Choice Model of Food Store Trips Using National Household Food Acquisition and Purchase Survey (FoodAPS).” International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 14(10).

      Buzarda, Kristy, Gerald A. Carlino, Robert M. Hunt, Jake K. Carr, and Tony E. Smith. 2017. “The Agglomeration of American R&D Labs.” Journal of Urban Economics 101: 14-26.

      Dearmon, Jacob and Tony Smith. 2017. “Local Marginal Analysis of Spatial Data: A Gaussian Process Regression Approach with Bayesian Model and Kernel Averaging.” Spatial Econometrics 37: 297-342.

      Dearmon, Jacob and Tony Smith. 2016. “Gaussian Process Regression and Bayesian Model Averaging: An alternative approach to modeling spatial phenomena.” Geographical Analysis 48: 82-111.

      Grandner, Michael A., Tony E. Smith, Nicholas Jackson, Tara Jackson, Sarah Burgard, and Charles Branas. 2015. “Geographic Distribution of Insufficient Sleep across the US: A County-Level Hotspot Analysis.” Sleep Health 1(3): 158-165.

       

      Faculty Fellow

      Vukan Vuchic

      x

      UPS Foundation Professor Emeritus of Transportation Engineering

      About

      Vukan Vuchic is Professor Emeritus in the Department of Electrical and Systems Engineering (ESE) in the School of Engineering and Applied Science and Professor Emeritus in the Department of City and Regional Planning in the School of Design. He researches transportation systems, especially urban transportation. He examines: urban transportation systems technology, operations, planning and economics; the definitions of transportation networks and systems components and their modeling; the interrelationship of cities and transportation with respect to urban policies, planning, livability and sustainability. His lectures, publications and projects have made significant contributions to the introduction of Light Rail Transit (LRT) systems in many North American cities. He has analyzed Metro rail networks and promoted High-Speed Railway (HSR) systems worldwide.

      Vuchic has been consultant to U.S. Department of Transportation, cities of Belgrade, Beijing, Philadelphia, Rome, Singapore and transit agencies BART, WMATA, NYCT, SEPTA, TTC, Moscow Metro, and many others. He has received medals from associations of transit agencies in Germany (VDV) and U.S. (APTA) and Honorary Doctorates (Honoris Causa) from CNAM University in Paris and Waterloo University in Canada. He is a foreign member of Academies of Sciences in Russia and Serbia.

       

      Selected Publications

      Vuchic, Vukan. 2007. Urban Transit Systems and Technology. John Wiley and Sons.

      Vuchic, Vukan. 2005. Urban Transit Operations, Planning and Economics. John Wiley and Sons.

      Vuchic, Vukan. 1999. Transportation for Livable Cities. Rutgers. 

       

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